Xolo Mexican Hairless Dog?

Xoloitzcuintli, pronounced “show-low-itz-QUEENT-ly” or “xolo‘”(“show-low”) for short, is more commonly known as the Mexican hairless dog. This exotic breed is a calm, alert, and loyal companion. While the standard xolo is a medium-sized dog, weighing between 30-55 pounds, the breed can also be found in two smaller sizes as well: toy and miniature.

While the standard xolo is a medium-sized dog , weighing between 30-55 pounds, the breed can also be found in two smaller sizes as well: toy and miniature . The ancient Aztec dog of the gods, xolos were loyal companions thought to ward off evil spirits.

Their unique look sets them apart from the rest of the pack, and xolo enthusiasts are quick to point out their strong, graceful bodies and calm, loving demeanors. Costs vary widely depending on a variety of factors, but Kay Lawson , past president of the Xoloitzcuintli Club of America , says owners looking for a show-worthy dog should expect to spend somewhere in the range of $2,000 for a registered xolo. Unlike many dogs that were bred to develop certain traits, xoloitzcuintlis evolved naturally thousands of years ago, giving them a distinctive look that means they never go unnoticed.

Their large, upright ears and wrinkly brows that furrow when deep in thought show quizzical expressions that make it clear this is one smart, emotive dog. These small-to-medium-sized dogs have a striking appearance and tend to be a dark color: Typically black, gray, bronze, or red. Lawson says the xoloitzcuintli’s history resonates with her on a personal level, citing its status as a breed that’s indigenous to the region.

Xolos might appeal to some people because of their lack of hair, which may be a help to those with allergies looking for a dog that doesn’t make them sniffle or scratch. “When properly bred and raised correctly, they are a primitive survivalist-not fragile and dependent-who are highly motivated to participate in whatever activity you are interested in.” They were coveted by the Aztecs and thought to protect the living from evil spirits and guide their owners in the afterlife.

They are calm and happy in the house, and their manageable size and gentle temperament means they can make good apartment dogs , especially the toy and miniature pups. But take note: Xolos have a high prey drive , meaning they might like to chase other animals such as rabbits and squirrels. Even xoloitzcuintli puppies can be talented escape artists, so owners must be aware of their surroundings and supervise them so the pups don’t go MIA.

And because they have no insulating layer of hair, their skin can feel very warm to the touch, like a comforting hot water bottle . Because xoloitzcuintlis are adept learners who are easily able to grasp cues and learn tricks , they need a confident person to show these “show-lows” the ropes. Unlike many dogs that were bred to develop certain traits, xoloitzcuintlis evolved naturally thousands of years ago, giving them a distinctive look that means they never go unnoticed.

But just like human teenagers, adolescent xolos can be prone to acne, according to the XCA , and regular baths can help keep their skin clear. Xolos often lose their premolars, the teeth located between canines and the molars, hence this cute look of a lolling tongue. Obesity can cause stress on their joints, so talk with your veterinarian about maintaining a healthy diet and how often to feed your xolo.

The OFA also names hip dysplasia , , and eye disorders as potential xoloitzcuintli health issues. Regular exercise and visits to the vet will help keep your xolo looking good and living a long life. Xolos are one of the world’s oldest breeds that evolved naturally, with archaeological evidence showing that they accompanied humans as they crossed the Bering Strait to the Americas, according to National Geographic .

The Mexican hairless‘ name, xoloitzcuintli, comes from two words in the Aztec language: Xolotl , the god of lightning and death, and itzcuintli , which means dog. According to legend, the god Xolotl created a dog to help guard the living and guide souls through the underworld. According to National Geographic, Xolo figurines and statues appear in ancient Mesoamerican art, often in burial sites.

The Aztecs also ate xoloitzcuintli meat, and when European explorers arrived they too developed a taste for the xolo, too.

How much does a hairless Xolo cost?

These hairless dogs are an excellent choice for folks suffering from Allergies, as Xoloitzcuintli is a hypo- allergenic dog breed. These dogs generally go for anywhere between $2,000 to $4,000.

How much does a Mexican hairless dog cost?

The average Xoloitzcuintli price is only $600 to $800 – $150 to $450 if you decide to adopt or rescue.

Can I buy a Xolo in Mexico?

“In Mexico, a xolo can be bought for $750, but in the U.S., you would have to pay $1,500 to $3,000 on average,” says Ichir. … “Like all breeds, there are breed-specific rescues for xolos and you can look on Pet Finder for them, too.

Can I own a Xolo?

You can buy a Xoloitzcuintli from a show breeder, who breeds Xolos to match a detailed standard of appearance for the dog show ring. … Xoloitzcuintli are not seen very often in pet shops, but it’s possible. I have plenty to say about buying a puppy from a pet shop!

The 3,000-year-old Xoloitzcuintli (pronounced show-low-eats-QUEENT-lee), the ancient Aztec dog of the gods, is today a loving companion and vigilant watchdog. The alert and loyal Xolo comes in three sizes, and in either hairless or coated varieties.

Though they descend from regal dogs dating back over 3,500 years, the Xoloitzcuintli (pronounced show-low-eats-QUEENT-lee) breed is still relatively unknown among many dog lovers. But, its worth taking note of these unique-looking canines, commonly called Xolos, or Mexican hairless dogs.

Xolos have developed thick, tough skin, but some dogs may require sunscreen for protection. But, its worth taking note of these unique-looking canines, commonly called Xolos , or Mexican hairless dogs.

More recently, artists like Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera adored these dogs and frequently featured them in their paintings. There are several different varieties of Xolos, which makes it quite easy to find the perfect pup to suit your familys needs. Thats because the AKC accepted this rare breed as a whole, with all three sizes included as one entity, according to Penny Inan, Xolo breeder and member of the judges education committee of the Xoloitzcuintli Club of America .

The acting board of the parent club decided that, after working to get this breed recognized for so long, we would just go in all together and accept the terms set forth by AKC, says Kay Lawson, AKC judge, Xolo breeder, and current treasurer of the Xoloitzcuintli Club of America. While a solid dark coat is preferable, white markings arent considered a fault in the ring. We also see incorrect coats that are longer, too thick, and those that resemble other breeds this is considered a fault when evaluating a puppy.

Some Xolos, especially coated ones, may develop more floppy ears that dont stand erect, but this is considered a fault.

The Xoloitzcuintle (or Xoloitzquintle, Xoloitzcuintli, or Xolo) is one of several breeds of hairless dog. It is found in Estndar (Standard), Intermedio (intermediate), and Miniatura (miniature) sizes. The Xolo also comes in a coated variety, totally covered in fur. Coated and hairless can be born in the same litter as a result of the same combination of genes. The hairless variant is known as the Perro peln mexicano or Mexican hairless dog.[1] It is characterized by its duality, wrinkles, and dental abnormalities, along with a primitive temper. In Nahuatl, from which its name originates, it is xlitzcuintli [oloitskinti] (singular)[2] and xlitzcuintin [oloitskintin] (plural).[2] The name comes from the god Xolotl that according to ancient narratives is its creator and itzcuntli [itskinti], meaning dog in Nahuatl language.[2]

Ceramic sculptures of a hairless breed of dog have been found in burial sites in ancient West Mexico. [3] In ancient times, Xolos were often sacrificed and then buried with their owners to act as guides to the soul on its journey to the underworld .

According to breed historian Norman Pelham Wright, author of The Enigma of the Xoloitzcuintli , Xolos began to turn up at Mexican dog shows in the late 1940s. Although they were recognized as indigenous specimens of a native breed, interest in them was minimal at that time, because information was scarce and no standard existed by which to judge them. With the official sanction of the FCI, Wright and a team of Mexican and British dog authorities set off to discover if any purebred Xolos still existed in remote areas of Mexico.

[ citation needed ] Eventually 10 structurally strong Xolos were found and these dogs formed the foundation of Mexico’s program to revive the breed. A committee headed by Wright authored the first official standard for the breed; on May 1, 1956, the Xolo was finally recognized in its native land and, as Mexico is a member of the FCI, worldwide. ‘Chinito Junior’, bred and owned by Valetska Radtke of New York City, became the breed’s only AKC champion to date.

The XCA is the official parent club for the breed, founded on October 26, 1986, for the purpose of regaining AKC recognition for the Xoloitzcuintli. The founding members voted unanimously to recognize all three sizes (toy, miniature and standard) and both varieties (hairless and coated) at their initial meeting. Similar in appearance to a Pharaoh Hound , with a sleek body, almond-shaped eyes, large bat-like ears, and a long neck, the Xolo is notable for its dominant trait of hairlessness.

This has also ensured a sturdy physical nature and vigorous health generally innate in both coated and hairless Xolos. Like active breeds such as terriers, Xolos need calm, consistent and loving obedience training and regular socialization during their growing years. [ failed verification ] They need bathing, light grooming and skin care as with other dogs of similar physical type, or acne can result.

Most skin problems arise from poor breeding, neglect, or over-bathing and over-lotioning, stripping natural protections and clogging pores. [21] A Xolo named Dante stars in the US blockbuster CGI animation 2017 Disney / Pixar film Coco . N Leathlobhair, Mire; Perri, Angela R.; Irving-Pease, Evan K.; Witt, Kelsey E.; Linderholm, Anna; Haile, James; Lebrasseur, Ophelie; Ameen, Carly; Blick, Jeffrey; Boyko, Adam R.; Brace, Selina; Cortes, Yahaira Nunes; Crockford, Susan J.; Devault, Alison; Dimopoulos, Evangelos A.; Eldridge, Morley; Enk, Jacob; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Gori, Kevin; Grimes, Vaughan; Guiry, Eric; Hansen, Anders J.; Hulme-Beaman, Ardern; Johnson, John; Kitchen, Andrew; Kasparov, Aleksei K.; Kwon, Young-Mi; Nikolskiy, Pavel A.; Lope, Carlos Peraza; Manin, Aurlie; Martin, Terrance; Meyer, Michael; Myers, Kelsey Noack; Omura, Mark; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Pavlova, Elena Y.; Sciulli, Paul; Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.; Strakova, Andrea; Ivanova, Varvara V.; Widga, Christopher; Willerslev, Eske; Pitulko, Vladimir V.; Barnes, Ian; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Dobney, Keith M.; Malhi, Ripan S.; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Larson, Greger; Frantz, Laurent A. F. (6 July 2018).

Bergstrm, Anders; Frantz, Laurent; Schmidt, Ryan; Ersmark, Erik; Lebrasseur, Ophelie; Girdland-Flink, Linus; Lin, Audrey T.; Stor, Jan; Sjgren, Karl-Gran; Anthony, David; Antipina, Ekaterina; Amiri, Sarieh; Bar-Oz, Guy; Bazaliiskii, Vladimir I.; Bulatovi, Jelena; Brown, Dorcas; Carmagnini, Alberto; Davy, Tom; Fedorov, Sergey; Fiore, Ivana; Fulton, Deirdre; Germonpr, Mietje; Haile, James; Irving-Pease, Evan K.; Jamieson, Alexandra; Janssens, Luc; Kirillova, Irina; Horwitz, Liora Kolska; Kuzmanovic-Cvetkovi, Julka; Kuzmin, Yaroslav; Losey, Robert J.; Dizdar, Daria Lonjak; Mashkour, Marjan; Novak, Mario; Onar, Vedat; Orton, David; Pasaric, Maja; Radivojevic, Miljana; Rajkovic, Dragana; Roberts, Benjamin; Ryan, Hannah; Sablin, Mikhail (2020). ^ Manin, Aurlie; Ollivier, Morgane; Bastian, Fabiola; Zazzo, Antoine; Tombret, Olivier; Equihua Manrique, Juan Carlos; Lefvre, Christine (October 2018). ^ Drgemller, Cord; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Hytnen, Marjo K.; Perloski, Michele; Dolf, Gaudenz; Sainio, Kirsi; Lohi, Hannes; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Leeb, Tosso (12 September 2008).

Appearance

Xoloitzcuintli, pronounced “show-low-itz-QUEENT-ly” or “xolo‘”(“show-low”) for short, is more commonly known as the Mexican hairless dog. This exotic breed is a calm, alert, and loyal companion. While the standard xolo is a medium-sized dog, weighing between 30-55 pounds, the breed can also be found in two smaller sizes as well: toy and miniature.The xoloitzcuintli’s history begins more than 3,500 years ago in Mexico and Central America. The ancient Aztec dog of the gods, xolos were loyal companions thought to ward off evil spirits. It was a good job … until their owners died, when the dogs were often sacrificed and buried with their people (the belief was they’d help guide their owners into the afterlife).Today, xolos live a more casual existence. Their unique look sets them apart from the rest of the pack, and xolo enthusiasts are quick to point out their strong, graceful bodies and calm, loving demeanors. What they lack in hair, these pups more than make up for in loyalty to their owners.If you’re looking to add a xoloitzcuintli to your household, it will likely set you back a few bucks. Costs vary widely depending on a variety of factors, but Kay Lawson

Temperament

“[Xolos] are highly intelligent and adaptable,” Lawson says. “When properly bred and raised correctly, they are a primitive survivalist-not fragile and dependent-who are highly motivated to participate in whatever activity you are interested in.”Lawson advises xoloitzcuintli owners that they’ll need to commit a significant amount of time to train their xolo during puppyhood. These energetic pups need a lot of attention and exercise, so they may not be the best dog for a busy household without the ability to train and socialize their dog properly. While xolos have a reputation as great family pets, they may not have patience for the clumsiness of small children who tug on their ears or tail. As with any dog, it’s important to supervise anytime kids and pups are together and teach your children how to properly interact with pets.Xolos may also be slow to warm to strangers, so they won’t be hamming it up like a Labrador for attention. They also make excellent watch dogs-they’ll let you know if anything is amiss with a bark, but aren’t particularly yappy.Like most dogs, a properly trained, exercised, and cared for xolo will be a reliable companion for years to come. “They are, for the most part, a healthy, solid, athletic partner,” Lawson says. “And a dog that will bond intensely with [his] owner.”

Living Needs

Xoloitzcuintlis need daily exercise, but nothing too extreme-they’ll be happy with 20-30 minute walks twice a day and some off-leash playtime in a fenced-in yard. They are calm and happy in the house, and their manageable size and gentle temperament means they can make good apartment dogs, especially the toy and miniature pups.But take note: Xolos have a high prey drive, meaning they might like to chase other animals such as rabbits and squirrels. They’re also excellent jumpers who have been known to easily scale a 6-foot fence. Even xoloitzcuintli puppies can be talented escape artists, so owners must be aware of their surroundings and supervise them so the pups don’t go MIA. Teaching them to stay and come when called is vital, and make sure your xolo is always on a leash when not in a fenced space.Because xolos don’t have much (or any!) hair, they’re better suited to warmer climates and will need a coat to go outside in the cold. But if it does get chilly, fear not: Xoloitzcuintlis love embracing the

Care

Training a xolo is similar to other dogs, as they need consistency and react best to positive reinforcement. Because xoloitzcuintlis are adept learners who are easily able to grasp cues and learn tricks, they need a confident person to show these “show-lows” the ropes. They can be a bit strong-willed at times, so consistency is key; these pups might be best suited for experienced dog owners.”Most importantly, they are not a dog that can just be left at home on their own for hours while their owners are away to work,” Lawson says. “They will find a way to entertain themselves, and it most likely will not be in a way that you find acceptable. They don’t do well when left crated for extended amounts of time.”Despite being hairless, a xoloitzcuintli still needs grooming. Xolos clean themselves like cats, but need regular baths to keep their skin healthy and clean. Because their skin is prone to burning, they need dog-formulated sunscreen (human sunscreen can be toxic for dogs) if they spend ample time outside in the sun. Their nails grow fast and should be trimmed often, and their teeth brushed regularly with dog formulated toothpaste.

Health

The typical xoloitzcuintli lifespan is a lengthy 13-18 years. They tend to be a healthy breed, and aren’t prone to any serious genetic diseases.Skin care for these Mexican hairless dogs should be top of mind. If they do get cuts or abrasions, their tough skin tends to heal fast. But just like human teenagers, adolescent xolos can be prone to acne, according to the XCA, and regular baths can help keep their skin clear.You may have seen cute pictures of xoloitzcuintlis with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. Xolos often lose their premolars, the teeth located between canines and the molars, hence this cute look of a lolling tongue. This is normal and doesn’t affect their ability to eat.Speaking of food, it’s important to note that xoloitzcuintlis have a tendency to overeat. Obesity can cause stress on their joints, so talk with your veterinarian about maintaining a healthy diet and how often to feed your xolo.The OFA also names hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, and eye disorders as potential xoloitzcuintli health issues. Regular exercise and visits to the vet will help keep your xolo looking good and living a long life. Before bringing home a dog, make sure your xoloitzcuintli breeder completes all tests recommended by the OFA.

History

Xoloitzcuintli dogs have an incredible history that goes back more than 3,000 years. Xolos are one of the world’s oldest breeds that evolved naturally, with archaeological evidence showing that they accompanied humans as they crossed the Bering Strait to the Americas, according to National Geographic.The Mexican hairless‘ name, xoloitzcuintli, comes from two words in the Aztec language:According to National Geographic, Xolo figurines and statues appear in ancient Mesoamerican art, often in burial sites. These hairless dogs were thought to have healing powers and ward off evil spirits for people on earth, too. Unfortunately for the xolo, that meant they were often sacrificed when their owners died so they could escort their people into the underworld.The Aztecs also ate xoloitzcuintli meat, and when European explorers arrived they too developed a taste for the xolo, too. So much so, that they almost ate them into extinction.In more recent centuries, xoloitzcuintlis have gone through many ebbs and flows of popularity. The American Kennel Club first recognized the breed in 1887 as the “Mexican hairless,” but the breed waned in popularity and lost its AKC registration in the middle of the 20th century.Today, the xolo is experiencing a bit of a revival: They were recognized by Mexico in 1954, and the AKC re-recognized the breed in 2011. The xoloitzcuintli is currently the official national dog of Mexico.

Xolos Come in Many Colors

Like many breeds, Xolos come in more than one size.Unlike other breeds, however, all three sizes of this breed compete together in AKC conformation. That’s because the AKC accepted this rare breed as a whole, with all three sizes included as one entity, according to Penny Inan, Xolo breeder and member of the judges’ education committee of the Xoloitzcuintli Club of America.In 2011, when the Xoloitzcuintli was accepted into the Non-Sporting Group as the AKC’s 170th recognized breed, the Xolo parent club decided not to separate the varieties into distinct breeds.“The acting board of the parent club decided that, after working to get this breed recognized for so long, we would just go in ‘all together’ and accept the terms set forth by AKC,” says Kay Lawson, AKC judge, Xolo breeder, and current treasurer of the Xoloitzcuintli Club of America.Responsible breeders encourage mating Xolos of the same size, which will usually produce similar-sized offspring, but there are exceptions.“It depends on the breeding,” says Inan. “A large Miniature may ‘go over’ the size limits and be a small Standard, or vice versa.”

Xolos Come in Hairless and Coated Varieties

The two varieties of Xolos are those with no hair and those with a short coat. According to the breed standard, hairless varieties can have some hair on their head, feet, and tail.Coated Xolos have a thin coat of fur all over their bodies.“The tail should only have the correct coat — that is short and tight to the body — on the lower third and the feet should only have coat on the feet to the wrist and not higher than the pastern,” says Lawson.“These dogs are completely covered in, ideally, a short, smooth, close-fitting coat of hair,” says Inan. “It should be a solid dark color, although there are variations and no disqualifications.”“The coat should never be plush, wavy, curly, or uneven,” adds Lawson. “We also see incorrect coats that are longer, too thick, and those that resemble other breeds — this is considered a fault when evaluating a puppy.”

History[edit]

Ceramic sculptures of a hairless breed of dog have been found in burial sites in ancient West Mexico.Sixteenth-century Spanish accounts tell of large numbers of dogs being served at banquets.The Aztecs consumed few domesticated animals, with over 90% of the bones found at archeological sites being deer.

Lineage[edit]

A 1999 genetic study using mitochondrial DNA found that the DNA sequences of the Xoloitzcuintle were identical to those of dogs from the Old World.Their phenotype is a consequence of canine ectodermal dysplasia caused by a mutation on the Foxl3 autosomal gene.

Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI)[edit]

The breed did not receive any official notice in its homeland until the 1950s. The FCI, founded in 1940, was not prepared to declare the Xolo an official purebred at that time. According to breed historian Norman Pelham Wright, author of

American Kennel Club (AKC)[edit]

Xolos were among the first breeds recorded by the American Kennel Club (AKC). A Mexican dog named ‘Mee Too’ made breed history as the first AKC-registered Xolo in 1887. ‘Chinito Junior’, bred and owned by Valetska Radtke of New York City, became the breed’s only AKC champion to date. He earned his title on October 19, 1940.In 1959, the Xolo was dropped from the AKC stud book due to the breed’s scarcity and perceived extinction. The Xoloitzcuintli Club of America (XCA) was founded in October 1986 to regain AKC recognition for the breed. On May 13, 2008, AKC voted to readmit the breed to its Miscellaneous Class starting January 1, 2009. The XCA is the official parent club for the breed, founded on October 26, 1986, for the purpose of regaining AKC recognition for the Xoloitzcuintli. The founding members voted unanimously to recognize all three sizes (toy, miniature and standard) and both varieties (hairless and coated) at their initial meeting. Since then, the XCA has compiled a stud book modeled on requirements for eventual AKC acceptance, held an annual independent specialty show, published a quarterly newsletter,

Appearance[edit]

The breed ranges in size from about 10 to 55 lb (5 to 23 kg). The height is 9 to 26 inches (23–67 cm). Similar in appearance to a Pharaoh Hound, with a sleek body, almond-shaped eyes, large bat-like ears, and a long neck, the Xolo is notable for its dominant trait of hairlessness.The Xolo is moderate in all aspects of its appearance, conveying an impression of strength, agility, and elegance. Xolo body proportions are rectangular, slightly longer in total body length than the height measured at the highest point of the withers (top of the shoulders). The breed occurs naturally in two varieties, hairless and coated. Hairless Xolos are the dominant expression of the heterozygous Hh hairless trait.Both varieties occur in all hair or skin colors, and the skin is often marked, splashed, or spotted. The most common colors are various shades termed black, grey, bronze, yellowish-blonde, blue and red. The breed occurs in a range of sizes, which breeders have standardized into three designations: Standard, Miniature and Toy.

Temperament[edit]

The Xoloitzcuintle’s ‘primitive’ temperament (very high intelligence, sensitivity, high energy, inquisitiveness, strong hunting, and social instincts) is apparent because the breed’s temperament was not modified overall by selective breeding in their native history in Mexico. This has also ensured a sturdy physical nature and vigorous health generally innate in both coated and hairless Xolos. Adult Xolos are frequently noted for their calm demeanor, although puppies can be extremely energetic, noisy, and very oral until they reach maturity (after 2 years old) and do not bark much, after which they tend to settle down and become more calm. Inadequately supervised or exercised Xolos can become escape artists, climbing and jumping fences to chase. Many individuals of this breed can possess guard dog ability and will not back down from a fight. At the same time, adult dogs, when they are raised properly, can become steady, well-behaved, and affectionate companions.Though physically grown at 1 year, many dog breeds including Xolos, are not ’emotionally mature’ until around 2 years. Like active breeds such as terriers, Xolos need calm, consistent and loving obedience training and regular socialization during their growing years. Well-raised Xolos bond strongly with their owners, becoming highly devoted to their families while frequently choosing one specific family member as favorite.Anyone considering acquiring a Xolo should expect to spend time educating themselves in positive reinforcement dog training techniques and, ideally, should have prior experience with active and intelligent dog breeds. A spacious, well-fenced, and safe physical environment is desirable for this breed. Daily walks are ideal for exercising most Toy-sized Xolos; however, more stimulating physical and mental exercise is advised for larger and more active individuals. Behavior problems in Xolos are typically a result of a dog receiving inadequate or inconsistent supervision, as well as inadequate exercise and mental stimulation. The Xoloitzcuintle is a social dog that should not, in most cases, be an “only dog“. It does not do well when kept as an outside-only dog. This is a breed that is at its best when it is made part of the family, receiving regular interaction and socialization with its humans (and other dogs, whether present in the home or as regular playmates).

Health[edit]

The Xolo has been developed by natural selection for thousands of years, and is therefore generally not prone to health and structure problems as other dog breeds more modified by human selection efforts. Xolos came from tropical climates and are not suited for outdoor life in colder temperate and northern climates; they should be considered an indoor dog breed.

In contemporary culture[edit]

Xoloitzcuintles have been receiving more recognition in recent years, this can be seen in increased representation in popular culture and in the popularity of the dog as a pet.The Xoloitzcuintle is the symbol and mascot of Club Tijuana, the Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente, a professional soccer club founded in 2007. Xolos are depicted in some of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s paintings,