Wire Haired Fox Terrier?

Possessing boundless energy, the Wire Fox Terrier makes an excellent pet for the household with well mannered children. This terrier wants to please and responds well to training.

The Wire Fox Terrier is so called because of the dense, wiry texture of his coat. White should be the predominate color of the wire with markings of black and tan.

The wire fox terrier is a small dog with a sleek build. Wire fox terrier are lively and will not blend quietly into the background of your home. They are best suited to a family who wants to include their pet in lots of active play.

The wire fox terrier is an alert dog and will let its owner know if a stranger is approaching. These dogs are easily trained, and obedience classes are recommended to curb the strong hunting instinct. The biggest consideration in owning a wire fox terrier is the boundless energy of the breed.

Wire Fox Terrier make excellent companions for children, because they never tire of games or playing outside. Foxhound masters who wanted a quick, alert little dog that could easily accompany them on the hunt developed the modern Fox Terrier.

Are wire haired fox terriers good pets?

Possessing boundless energy, the Wire Fox Terrier makes an excellent pet for the household with well mannered children. This terrier wants to please and responds well to training. Like the Smooth Fox Terrier, the wire fox terrier is a natural hunter bred for bravery and determination.

How much do wire haired fox terriers cost?

The Wire Fox Terrier puppies typically cost between $1,500 and $3,000. The price can vary dramatically based on your location, availability of parents, and breeder quality.

Do wire haired fox terrier bark a lot?

Fox Terriers bark a lot and their barks typically are high-pitched. Fox Terriers are prone to chasing rabbits, birds, cats, and even other dogs. They’re scrappy and will pick fights with other dogs, even those that are much larger than they are. … Fox Terriers are escape artists.

Do wire haired fox terriers shed?

Wire Hair Fox Terriers shed very little, but their coat needs to be regularly stripped of old hair or trimmed. They may be small, but they sure are muscular. The Fox Terrier is very hypoallergenic if the coat is well maintained with proper grooming.

Not everyone knows about the wonderful Wire Fox Terrier. But if you’ve chosen to share your family with this pup, you probably expected her to have certain traits that would fit your lifestyle:

Needs a lot of activity and mental stimulation to avoid boredom vices Exhibits signs of separation anxiety if left alone too much Can be independent and strong-willed Has a tendency to escape, wander, and roam Likes to dig Can be wary of and bark at strangers if not socialized properly There is a general consensus among canine genetic researchers and veterinary practitioners that the conditions weve described herein have a significant rate of incidence and/or impact in this breed.

If we dont prevent or treat dental disease, your buddy may lose her teeth and be in danger of damage to her kidneys, liver, heart, and joints. Wire Fox Terriers are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections the same ones that all dogs can get such as parvo, rabies, and distemper. Many of these infections are preventable through vaccination , which your Newport Harbor Animal Hospital team will recommend based on her age, the diseases we see in our area, and other factors.

Hookworms, roundworms, heartworms , and whipworms can get into her system in a number of ways: drinking unclean water, walking on contaminated soil, or being bitten by an infected mosquito. For your canine friend, these parasites can cause pain, discomfort, and even death, so its important that we test for them on a regular basis. Spaying or neutering decreases the likelihood of certain types of cancers and eliminates the possibility of your pet becoming pregnant or fathering unwanted puppies.

Performing this surgery also gives us a chance, while your pet is under anesthesia, to identify and address some of the diseases your dog is likely to develop. Routine blood testing prior to surgery also helps us to identify and take precautions against common problems that increase anesthetic or surgical risk. Unfortunately, Wire Fox Terriers can inherit or develop a number of different eye conditions, some of which may cause blindness if not treated right away, and most of which can be extremely painful!

Glaucoma, an eye condition that affects Wirehaired Fox Terriers and people too, is an extremely painful disease that rapidly leads to blindness if left untreated. Both hips and elbows are at risk for dysplasia, an inherited disease that causes the joints to develop improperly and results in arthritis. And keep in mind that overweight dogs may develop arthritis years earlier than those of normal weight, causing undue pain and suffering!

Young Wire Fox Terriers may be prone to a painful degenerative hip condition called Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Usually occurring between six and nine months of age, LCP causes pain and lameness in one or both rear legs, and often requires surgery. If heart valve disease is diagnosed early, we may be able to prescribe medications that could prolong your pets life for many years.

Reactive seizures are caused by the brain’s reaction to a metabolic problem like low blood sugar, organ failure, or a toxin. Lifelong medication is usually necessary to help keep seizures under control with periodic blood testing required to monitor side effects and efficacy. Von Willebrands disease is a blood clotting disorder frequently found in Wire Fox Terriers.

Degenerative myelopathy is a neurologic condition, similar to ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease in people, that causes weakness and poor nerve function in the hind legs. If your dog has this disease, he will become increasingly weak and disabled in the hind legs, eventually suffering from paralysis in his hindquarters, which also leads to incontinence. Your Wire Fox Terrier will likely live longer than many other breeds and therefore is more prone to get cancer in his golden years.

Heritable deafness has been noted in some Wire Fox Terrier bloodlines, so if his ears are healthy and he’s still ignoring you, a more thorough hearing workup may be needed, including brainwave analysis, if indicated. There will certainly be medical tests and procedures she will need throughout her life and pet health insurance will help you cover those costs. Build her routine care into your schedule to help your Wire Fox Terrier live longer, stay healthier, and be happier during her lifetime.

Many diseases cause dogs to have a characteristic combination of symptoms, which together can be a clear signal that your Wire Fox Terrier needs help. Change in appetite or water consumption Tartar build-up, bad breath, red gums, or broken teeth Itchy skin (scratching, chewing, or licking); hair loss Lethargy, mental dullness, or excessive sleeping Fearfulness, aggression, or other behavioral changes Dry, scaly, sometimes itchy, hairless patches on face or paws Easily startled, no reaction to unseen sounds

The Wire Fox Terrier breed standard says they should be on the tip-toe of expectation at the slightest provocation. Once a mainstay of traditional British foxhunts, todays Wire is a handsome and amusing companion and master show dog.

The Wire Fox Terrier puppies typically cost between $1,500 and $3,000. The price can vary dramatically based on your location, availability of parents, and breeder quality.

Female: 13-15 inches (33-38 cm) WeightMale: 15-20 pounds (7-9 kg)

Female: 13-18 pounds (6-8 kg) ColorsLitter Size4-6 puppiesPuppy PricesAverage $1500 – $3000 USD AdaptabilityApartment FriendlyThe Wire Fox Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised.

It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Barking TendenciesCat FriendlyChild Friendly Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them. Dog FriendlyExercise NeedsWirehaired Fox Terriers need a daily walk or jog.

If it is possible, they would love to run free in a safe area. Keep this dog on a leash if there are small animals around. The urge for these dogs to hunt is strong and they are likely to take off chasing a small animal.

Grooming Moderate Maintenance: The Wire Fox Terrier should be brushed several times a week and bathed when necessary. Health Issues Hypoallergenic: Yes Epilepsy is highly suspected to have a genetic component in this breed. Some minor concerns are post nasal drip, lens luxation, distichiasis, cataracts, Legg-calv-perthes syndrome and shoulder dislocation.

Prone to mast cell tumors. IntelligencePlayfulnessShedding Level Minimal Shedding: This dog will shed a negligible amount. Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with dog hair in their cars and homes.

Stranger FriendlyTrainability Moderately Easy Training: The Wire Fox Terrier should be obedience trained as a puppy. It requires consistent training and may challenge authority on occasion. Watchdog Ability RankBoy NamesGirl Names01CharlieLucy02CooperBella03ScoutMissie04OliverRuby05MooseMarley06RockyLola07DukeLily08TuckerBailey09HenryCoco10RileyChloe 100 Cute Puppy Names The Wire Fox Terrier is short-backed and square-proportioned, but at the same time standing over a lot of ground.

Its conformation combines speed, endurance and power, enabling it to gallop and stay with the horses and hounds during the hunt and to follow a fox up a narrow passage. The gait while trotting gets most of its propulsion from the rear quarters. The expression, like the attitude, is keen; the carriage is alert and expectant.

The coat is dense, wiry, broken and twisted, almost appearing like coconut matting, with a short, fine undercoat. The outer coat may be crinkled, but it should not be curly. A true “live-wire,” the wire fox terrier is always up for adventure.

This breed lives to play, explore, run, hunt and chase. It can be mischievous and independent and may dig and bark. It is usually fairly reserved with strangers.

The wire has a reputation for being somewhat scrappier with other dogs when compared to the smooth. When fox hunting became popular in England in the late 17th century, hunters found the need for a dog that could go to ground and bolt the quarry. Terriers, game and eager, were ideal for such a purpose but most of the early terriers were dark in color and too low on leg to run with a pack of foxhounds.

Hunters began to develop a longer-legged terrier, predominantly white in color so as not to be mistaken for a fox. Early fox terriers were primarily smooth-coated, but the wire coat persisted. By the end of the 19th century, smooth and wire-coated Fox Terriers were in great demand, both as companions and show dogs.

Although considered one breed for many years, interbreeding of Smooth Fox Terriers and Wire Fox Terriers ceased in the early 1900s. Except for coat, however, the two breeds are essentially identical. Both the Smooth Fox Terrier and the Wirehaired Fox Terrier were recognized by the AKC in 1885.

Some of the Fox Terrier‘s talents include: hunting, tracking, watchdog, agility and performing tricks. Lifespan: 12-15 years Smooth Fox Terrier Lifespan: 10-13 years Airedale Terrier Lifespan: 13-16 years Jack Russell Terrier Lifespan: 10-14 years Welsh Terrier

Club Recognition:

Often the coat is slightly waved, but the show standard is that the coat is never curly. White should be the predominate color of the wire with markings of black and tan.The wire fox terrier is a small dog with a sleek build. The male is about 18 pounds and the female is usually 16 pounds. They are between 13 and 15 inches tall. The face is long with ears that fold forward toward the cheeks.

Personality:

Wire fox terrier are lively and will not blend quietly into the background of your home. They thrive when given a job to do and strive to please their owners. By nature, they love to dig and may do so, especially if bored. They are best suited to a family who wants to include their pet in lots of active play.The wire fox terrier is an alert dog and will let its owner know if a stranger is approaching. These dogs are easily trained, and obedience classes are recommended to curb the strong hunting instinct. They can learn to get along with other pets, but males can be aggressive toward other males.

Living With:

The biggest consideration in owning a wire fox terrier is the boundless energy of the breed. Wire Fox Terrier make excellent companions for children, because they never tire of games or playing outside. They are eager to please and will respond well to training. They need an abundance of exercise to keep fit.Regular brushing with a natural bristle brush is needed to keep the coat healthy. Occasional clipping of the coat may be necessary but will soften the texture of the coat; hand stripping is required to maintain the correct texture but is too difficult for most pet owners.

Dental Disease

Dental disease is the most common chronic problem in pets, affecting 80% of all dogs by age two. Unfortunately, your Wire Fox Terrier is more likely than other dogs to have problems with her teeth. Dental disease starts with tartar build-up on the teeth and progresses to infection of the gums and roots of the teeth. If we don’t prevent or treat dental disease, your buddy may lose her teeth and be in danger of damage to her kidneys, liver, heart, and joints. In fact, your Wire Fox‘s life span may even be cut short by one to three years! We’ll clean your dog’s teeth regularly and let you know what you can do at home to keep those pearly whites clean.

Infections

Wire Fox Terriers are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections — the same ones that all dogs can get — such as parvo, rabies, and distemper. Many of these infections are preventable through vaccination, which your Newport Harbor Animal Hospital team will recommend based on her age, the diseases we see in our area, and other factors.

Obesity

Obesity can be a significant health problem in Wire Fox Terriers. It is a serious disease that may cause or worsen joint problems, metabolic and digestive disorders, back pain, and heart disease. Though it’s tempting to give your pal food when she looks at you with those soulful eyes, you can “love her to death” with leftover people food and doggie treats. Instead, give her a hug, brush her fur or teeth, play a game with her, or perhaps take her for a walk. She’ll feel better, and so will you!

Parasites

All kinds of worms and bugs can invade your Wire Fox Terrier‘s body, inside and out. Everything from fleas and ticks to ear mites can infest her skin and ears. Hookworms, roundworms, heartworms, and whipworms can get into her system in a number of ways: drinking unclean water, walking on contaminated soil, or being bitten by an infected mosquito. Some of these parasites can be transmitted to you or a family member and are a serious concern for everyone. For your canine friend, these parasites can cause pain, discomfort, and even death, so it’s important that we test for them on a regular basis. We’ll also recommend preventive medication as necessary to keep her healthy.

Spay or Neuter

One of the best things you can do for your Fox Terrier is to have her spayed (neutered for males). In females, this means we surgically remove the ovaries and usually the uterus, and in males, it means we surgically remove the testicles. Spaying or neutering decreases the likelihood of certain types of cancers and eliminates the possibility of your pet becoming pregnant or fathering unwanted puppies. Performing this surgery also gives us a chance, while your pet is under anesthesia, to identify and address some of the diseases your dog is likely to develop. For example, if your pet needs hip X-rays or a puppy tooth extracted, this would be a good time—it’s more convenient for you and easier on your friend too. Routine blood testing prior to surgery also helps us to identify and take precautions against common problems that increase anesthetic or surgical risk. Don’t worry; we’ll discuss the specific problems we will be looking for when the time arrives.

Allergies

Not many things have as dramatic an impact on your dog’s quality of life as the proper functioning of his eyes. Unfortunately, Wire Fox Terriers can inherit or develop a number of different eye conditions, some of which may cause blindness if not treated right away, and most of which can be extremely painful! We will evaluate his eyes at every examination to look for any signs for concern.

Knee Problems

Sometimes your Fox Terrier‘s kneecap (patella) may slip out of place. This is called patellar luxation. You might notice that your pet, while running, suddenly picks up a back leg or skips and hops for a few strides. He might then kick his leg out sideways to pop the kneecap back in place. These are common signs of patellar luxation. If the problem is mild and involves only one leg, your friend may not require much treatment beyond arthritis medication. When symptoms are severe, surgery may be needed to realign the kneecap to keep it from luxating further.

Heart Disease

Both hips and elbows are at risk for dysplasia, an inherited disease that causes the joints to develop improperly and results in arthritis. Stiffness in your Fox Terrier‘s elbows or hips may become a problem for him, especially as he matures. You may notice that he begins to show lameness in his legs or has difficulty getting up from lying down. We can treat the arthritis—the sooner the better—to minimize discomfort and pain. We’ll take X-rays of your dog’s bones to identify issues as early as possible. Surgery is also sometimes a good option in severe and life-limiting cases. And keep in mind that overweight dogs may develop arthritis years earlier than those of normal weight, causing undue pain and suffering!

Megaesophagus

The esophagus carries food from the mouth to the stomach through downward contractions. If the esophagus isn’t contracting properly, food may remain in the esophagus, stretching it to “mega” size. If your Fox Terrier is affected, he may throw up tube-shaped portions of undigested food. Special feeding postures, dietary modifications, and medications may be needed to manage this problem. Unfortunately, dogs with megaesophagus commonly inhale bits of food while eating and can develop severe pneumonia. If you notice any unusual eating behaviors or vomiting after eating, be sure to let us know. A quick, painless x-ray can help us determine if your pet has this condition.

Epilepsy

There are three types of seizures in dogs: reactive, secondary, and primary. Reactive seizures are caused by the brain’s reaction to a metabolic problem like low blood sugar, organ failure, or a toxin. Secondary seizures are the result of a brain tumor, stroke, or trauma. If no other cause can be found, the disease is called primary or idiopathic epilepsy. This problem is often an inherited condition, and Wirehaired Fox Terriers are commonly afflicted. If your friend is prone to seizures, episodes will usually begin between six months and three years of age. An initial diagnostic workup may help find the cause. Lifelong medication is usually necessary to help keep seizures under control with periodic blood testing required to monitor side effects and efficacy. If your dog has a seizure, carefully prevent him from injuring himself, but don’t try to control his mouth or tongue. It won’t help him, and he may bite you accidentally! Note the length of the seizure, and call us at (949) 631-1030 or call an emergency hospital.

Bleeding Disorders

There are several types of inherited bleeding disorders that occur in dogs. They range in severity from very mild to very severe. Many times a pet seems normal until a serious injury occurs or surgery is performed, and then severe bleeding can result. Von Willebrand’s disease is a blood clotting disorder frequently found in Wire Fox Terriers. We’ll conduct diagnostic testing for blood clotting times or a specific DNA blood test for Von Willebrand’s disease and other similar disorders to check for this problem before we perform surgery.

Degenerative Myelopathy

Degenerative myelopathy is a neurologic condition, similar to ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease in people, that causes weakness and poor nerve function in the hind legs. It affects Fox Terriers more frequently than other breeds. If your dog has this disease, he will become increasingly weak and disabled in the hind legs, eventually suffering from paralysis in his hindquarters, which also leads to incontinence. Rehabilitation, exercise, acupuncture, and dietary supplements can be helpful, but there is no cure for degenerative myelopathy. A genetic test is available to determine whether your dog is at risk for this heritable disease.

Neurological Disease

A genetically linked neurological condition, known as wobbler disease or wobbler syndrome, causes a wobbly, drunken gait in affected pets. Wobbler disease is the result of a narrowing of the vertebrae in the neck that pinches the spinal cord and associated nerves. When pinched, the nerves do not send signals to the brain as they should causing the pet to be unable to feel his feet. The first signs you will often notice with wobbler disease are unstable hind legs, stumbling, and sometimes falling. Treatment options include medications, neck braces, rehabilitation exercise programs, and surgery.

Mange

Demodex is a microscopic mite that lives in the hair follicles of all dogs. Normally a dog’s immune system keeps the mites in check, but some breeds, like your Fox Terrier, may develop an overabundance of these mites. In mild cases, pet owners may notice a few dry, irritated, hairless lesions. These often occur on the face or feet and may or may not be itchy. Secondary skin infections may also occur. Prompt veterinary care is important to keep the disease from getting out of hand. Many pets seem to outgrow the problem, while others require lifelong management.

Dental Abnormalities

Teeth abnormalities are often genetically induced and are relatively common in dogs, especially in purebred dogs like your Fox Terrier. An overbite or underbite is called a malocclusion or a bad bite. Oligodontia is a condition where only a few teeth are present. Misaligned teeth can also occur and cause lots of problems, but can usually be corrected with braces or extractions. (Yes, dogs can get braces!) We want to keep your buddy’s teeth healthy, so we will be watching his developing teeth closely.

Cancer

Cancer is a leading cause of death in older dogs. Your Wire Fox Terrier will likely live longer than many other breeds and therefore is more prone to get cancer in his golden years. Many cancers are curable by surgical removal, and some types are treatable with chemotherapy. Early detection is critical! We’ll perform periodic diagnostic tests and look for lumps and bumps when we examine your pet.

Deafness

Heritable deafness has been noted in some Wire Fox Terrier bloodlines, so if his ears are healthy and he’s still ignoring you, a more thorough hearing workup may be needed, including brainwave analysis, if indicated. If you suspect he may not be hearing as well as he should, schedule an appointment with us right away as the problem could also be caused by a severe ear infection.

What to Watch For

Build her routine care into your schedule to help your Wire Fox Terrier live longer, stay healthier, and be happier during her lifetime. We cannot overemphasize the importance of a proper diet and exercise routine.