Will a Fox Attack a Cat?

The sad saga of the M25 Cat Killer began when an animal-rights group made the explosive claim that a human criminal was systematically stabbing and dismembering beloved pets, mostly in the London area.

In September 2018, after three years and unknown quantities of taxpayers money, the official investigation discovered that foxes scavenge dead animals. What they did say is wholly consistent with the forensic evidence, known animal behaviour and common sense: cats and foxes themselves are often hit by cars and then partly consumed by wild scavengers.

The respondents were a general snapshot of British society young, old, city-dweller or rural born and bred: they were given the chance to state in their own words how they viewed the foxes in their midst. While the biological error appears to be an uncommon belief most people surely recognise foxes as members of the dog family this comment does highlight several disliking factors. But faced with those who hate the same hyenas because of an ideological grudge and subconscious brainwashing from Disney cartoons, it falls painfully short.

It is dreadful that many grieving pet owners were caused unnecessary anguish by the claim that their animal had met a grisly end via a human monster. It is also unfortunate that the slightly garbled reporting poured fresh doubt into the sensitive topic of how foxes and cats really interact. If we are to live in peace, on terms that are genuinely compassionate for both rabbit owner and fox, we need to consider animal behaviour in a more realistic and dispassionate way.

Are foxes a danger to cats?

Kittens and very small (less than five pounds) adult cats, however, could be prey for a fox. The best way to avoid encounters between foxes and cats is to keep your cats indoors —a practice that will keep your cats safe from other hazards as well, such as traffic, disease and fights, to mention only a few.

Can a cat get away from a fox?

Wild foxes are very shy and do not make contact with other animals if they do not have to. Adult cats have very little to fear from a fox, however, small pets such as small cats, hedgehogs, and little dogs could be in danger.

Do foxes and cats get along?

Generally, foxes get along well with dogs and cats and often learn their habits.

Foxes have started to make their homes in neighborhoods and urban settings. This is due to human expansion and development. The more we take land away from animals, the more they must adapt to survive.

Wild animals are unpredictable, and smaller pets, such as small cats and dogs, can be prey to a fox . It is a rare occasion for a fox to square up with a house cat, but it does happen.

You can help by securing your property , mending fences, and adding additional fortification, if needed. If you are worried that a fox is getting into your yard, and that your cat is in danger, then there are a few things you can do to help keep them safe. Even if they are outside cats, if you see a fox or wild animal, you should bring your pets inside, where it is safe.

If you spot a fox in your yard and feel that you or your cat/pets are in danger, scream and wave your arms. They are not legally classified as vermin, and they help get rid of pests such as rodents. It can be argued that feeding them is helping them since they have already made their homes among us, and started to adapt.

No chocolate No pits from cherries or peaches No grapes and raisins No onions or garlic You could probably watch hundreds of videos from peoples security cameras on youtube, of foxes raiding pet dishes. I have seen some people argue over if this is the right thing to do, and in most cases, those who use cat foods, have healthy foxes.

While foxes will most likely not pick a fight with a full-grown cat, since they are the same size, they will seize on an opportunity to prey on the weak and young. Similar Articles Foxes are opportunistic feeders and will feed on smaller mammals. Small dogs and pets should be secured inside if there is a wild animal nearby.

Wild foxes are omnivores and eat a variety of small game mammals, fruits, and vegetation.

Following reports of another attack on a baby by an urban fox in London, many people have been worried about the risk not just of foxes attacking children, but also pets. Cats in particular often spend much of their time outside, in the same areas as foxes. Is there a real risk of cats being attacked by foxes and what can owners do about it?

The good news is that a new database, VetCompass, has started to accumulate real, up to date information about health issues affecting pets in the UK.

Many of my clients keep their cats indoors at night. Its one of the times a cat enjoys exploring its territory. Like the dawn, its a time of day when there is less traffic human or motorised and when small mammals and other critters come out to play. When I question why these cats are kept in at night, 100% of the human guardians reply that it is because of foxes. I started to think about this and genuinely wanted to find out the facts myself. Another reason I wanted to do some research was because of my own fears connected to a fox den thats presently at the end of one of my clients gardens. Ive observed that every time the cat or a human enters the garden, the foxes run out of sight within seconds. The subject of foxes and cats sharing urban space really fascinates me, so I decided to gather some facts from the internet, as well as speak to as many people as possible involved with foxes or cats, including vets, wildlife sanctuaries, cat guardians with free roaming cats and animal hospitals. I have tried to make my research balanced and factual, unlike the scaremongering resorted to by some national newspapers who report foxes attacking babies as if its an everyday occurrence.

A typical urban fox home range can be also occupied by upwards of 100 cats, and most of these are out at night. Pete Wedderburn (BVM&S CertVR MRCVS) who works at Brayvet decided, luckily for me, to do his own in-depth research on the subject and in Feb 2013 published his findings.

VetCompass aim was to investigate the range and frequency of small animal health problems seen by veterinary surgeons working in general practice in the United Kingdom and to highlight the major risk factors for these conditions. Of course fox attacks can happen on the rare occasion and so cannot be entirely ruled out if we are to be realistic. Speaking personally to 12 veterinary surgeons based in London and country practices, I asked how many cases they had seen where a cat has been brought in with a suspected fox bite or fights within the last year.

I asked him what his thoughts were on foxes attacking cats and why he felt this could happen on occasions? Well, from a personal perspective, Ive had three cats in recent years and all of them chased the foxes out of the garden if they spotted them! However, when there are problems, its usually during the cub season, when foxes like all species will take on anyone and anything to protect their young.

are housed outside, a good quality pen is vital, because these are all natural prey to a fox. ..In any event, many more householders contact us with stories of chumming-up between a fox and the callers cat, dog or, rather more mysteriously, their rabbit(!) I have only ever heard of two cases in my 40 years of dealing with foxes, one of which turned out to be a German Shepherd and the other a cat.

foxes were shy creatures and the case in East London was an extremely rare occurrence. A baby fox hand reared It takes quite a lot of effort to catch them. Walking into peoples houses is not common place and they would never go in with the intention of attacking someone.

The fact is that the claims of people just do not add up to anything concrete, they are anecdotal, subject to misunderstanding and also to the average persons extremely low knowledge of wild animal behaviour. Newspapers give ludicrous coverage to fox scare stories and so the myths build up. I also spoke to Sharon Williams, who runs a pet boarding and dog and cat sitting company, called Purr-fect Kitty , in Shortlands which is surrounded by woodland.

I contacted Roger Abrantes PhD, Scientific Director of The Ethology Institute of Cambridge. On the contrary, even in farms where attacks on chicken were common, casualties among cats remained nil or extremely low, only counting as exceptions. Generally, though, when faced with the claws and teeth of a cat, foxes will back away, knowing they will probably suffer a serious injury in any fight.

I think this study concludes that it is rare for foxes to attack cats and that both species manage to co-exist and share space. Id like to thank the following people and organisations for taking part with this study or supplying useful information (in no particular order):

Cars, not foxes are the cat killers

And yes, carnassial teeth will leave marks that resemble knife wounds, not least because they are designed to provide wild carnivores with the function of a knife.Unbelievable, social media exclaimed. But anyone who cares for either cats or foxes should believe the cold bland facts.To be absolutely clear, the police did not claim that foxes are predating cats. What they did say is wholly consistent with the forensic evidence, known animal behaviour and common sense: cats – and foxes themselves – are often hit by cars and then partly consumed by wild scavengers. (Rabbits, though, are likely to be the victims of actual predation.)

What do we think of foxes?

What do people really think of foxes? How much damage do foxes actually cause, and what can fox advocates do to reduce it? In the autumn of 2015, I, along with Marc Baldwin of wildlifeonline.me.uk, commissioned an opinion poll company to approach more than 2,000 people.The respondents were a general snapshot of British society – young, old, city-dweller or rural born and bred: they were given the chance to state in their own words how they viewed the foxes in their midst.The results were astonishing. Three-quarters of respondents claimed to either like having foxes in their neighbourhoods, to feel no strong opinions about them, or to believe – probably incorrectly – that foxes were absent in their area.The other 25 per cent expressed outright disapproval. But what leapt jarringly forth was the vast gap between London and people in the largely rural Home Counties. The latter returned a fox disliking percentage of 19 per cent. In London, it was 33 per cent.

Fear of attack

Adult male Londoners were the least fox-sympathetic of all respondents. London women, however, were the most fearful of an actual fox attack. Meanwhile, women in the Home Counties scored the highest level of liking foxes.What motivates people to love or loathe foxes? “They look very threatening and I always worry they will attack my children.They are dirty (rodents) and they go through the bins. I would like them to be hunted and killed. They are RODENTS,” explained one respondent.While the biological error appears to be an uncommon belief – most people surely recognise foxes as members of the dog family – this comment does highlight several “disliking” factors.The top three complaints were raiding dustbins, making noise, and leaving scat. Worries about the safety of pets and children also scored fairly high. Surprisingly few respondents suggested any concern about garden damage or zoonotic diseases.

Learning the facts about foxes

The conservation biologist wanting to reduce human-wildlife conflict first needs to know what conflict genuinely exists. It is a sobering reality that some of the most explosive complaints about wild animals bear little resemblance to what wildlife actually does.Cold, hard science can help when a shepherd needs assistance protecting his goats from hyenas. But faced with those who hate the same hyenas because of an ideological grudge and subconscious brainwashing from Disney cartoons, it falls painfully short.It is dreadful that many grieving pet owners were caused unnecessary anguish by the claim that their animal had met a grisly end via a human monster. It is also unfortunate that the slightly garbled reporting poured fresh doubt into the sensitive topic of how foxes and cats really interact.Reality, however, is rather calmer. Even assuming that Defra’s estimate of 430,000 British foxes is correct, cats outnumber them by nearly 19 to 1. On any given night, a fox will encounter many cats, and the normal outcome is for the two animals to ignore each other.

Do Foxes Eat Cats?

Foxes and cats have a lot in common. Adult foxes are almost the same size as adult cats and they have similar dietary needs. Foxes eat rodents and other small mammals, much like feral cats. It is a rare occasion for a fox to square up with a house cat, but it does happen.In the case of pet foxes, or rescued foxes, they seem to get along with other animals in their home. If they are with other pets from a young age, they can form bonds with them. Pet foxes are only tamed, so they are still wild animals. So there is alwaysWild animals can have diseases. Housepets and cats, even if they are outside cats, should be brought inside if there is a fox around. You would not want to risk exposure to a sick animal or the threat of danger.Foxes and housecats rarely come into contact. Wild foxes are very shy and do not make contact with other animals if they do not have to. Adult cats have very little to fear from a fox, however, small pets such as small cats, hedgehogs, and little dogs could be in danger.Small cats and pets, should always be looked after and monitored if they are going to be outside. In the case of outside cats, they will have to fend for themselves, but they are notorious at being able to defend themselves.There are some instances, where a fox may be curious, and wind up face to face with a house cat. Also, there is always a chance, even if it is slim, that a wild animal could pick a fight with your cat. This is whyFoxes do not hunt cats, as a food source. Situations where a cat is eaten by a fox, are rare in the wild. Feral cats that are adults are the same size as foxes, and the two would most likely avoid each other. They both eat smaller mammals, such as rodents and small rabbits.Foxes are predators so there is always a chance that they will hunt what is available to them. They could also see an opportunity, if a cat is wounded, or is too young to defend itself. Even in urban settings,The statistics for cats killed by foxes in neighborhoods show that only a very small percentage of cats are killed by foxes in urban settings. In some cases, foxes can be mistaken for other predators, such as coyotes and wild dogs. Most of the information available is reported by homeowners, in online forums.If you are worried that a fox is getting into your yard, and that your cat is in danger, then there are a few things you can do to help keep them safe.Some people see urban foxes as pests or vermin. They are not legally classified as vermin, and they help get rid of pests such as rodents. The urban fox’s diet is made up of several sources, such as rodents, food from trash bins, food set out by people, and whatever else they can find.Our stance on the matter is not to feed any wild animal, even urban foxes. However, people will still choose to do so, so it is good to have information available, as to what is ok to feed them, and what is not ok.If you are going to feed wild foxes or urban foxes, then try to stick to these types of food.There are also foods that you should avoid feeding foxes.Urban foxes mostly rely on rodents. This makes cats less of a target of being hunted but does put them in the same hunting territory as urban foxes.Foxes have been known to eat cat food. There are many reports online, of foxes eating from cat dishes left outside. Foxes are opportunistic and will eat from gardens, food dishes, and whatever else they can find. You could probably watch hundreds of videos from people’s security cameras on youtube, ofFoxes do have a similar diet as cats do. Even more closely to feral cats. However, household cat foods are fattening for a fox. Some pet fox, and rescued fox owners, will feed their foxes certain brands of cat food that are less fattening.Some vets may even suggest a certain brand of cat food, for foxes. Exotic animal vets, usually have different opinions on the matter. There is is no handbook for raising foxes (That I know of.) I have seen some people argue over if this is the right thing to do, and in most cases, those who use cat foods, have healthy foxes. So the verdict is out.In rare circumstances, a fox could eat kittens. While foxes will most likely not pick a fight with a full-grown cat, since they are the same size, they will seize on an opportunity to prey on the weak and young. This includes kittens, small pets, and older pets who are sick or wounded.These types of situations are not all that common. It is more likely to happen in the wild, to feral kittens, than housecat kittens. In the wild anything is game. Foxes are opportunistic predators, that feed on what is available to them in their territories.Will a fox eat a cat? They will if they see them as easy prey. Foxes are scavengers and will prey on any animal that is small enough, and weak enough. They will eat from trashcans, gardens, chicken coops, and anything else they can get to, without being seen.Foxes will eat dead cats and other dead carcasses, known as carrion. If a fox is eating a cat, there is a good chance the cat was already dead. Foxes will scavenge from roadkill, and carcasses left behind by other carnivorous predators.