Why Would a Dog Pee on Your Bed?

If your dog is peeing on your bed, you are likely beyond frustrated. Dog urine can ruin your bed. Plus, once the urine odor is there, your dog can be attracted to pee on the area again.

It’s important to begin by ruling out medical causes before you try to address potential behavioral problems. Other issues with the urinary tract can make it difficult for dogs to control bladder activity.

Hormone-responsive urinary incontinence is not uncommon in female dogs and may even affect males though more rare. If your vet rules out all potential medical reasons for your dog‘s inappropriate urination, then it’s time to work on correcting the behavior. An anxious or fearful dog is unable to learn new things, so you will need to reduce stress before you work on training.

Why do dogs pee on their owners bed?

Dogs urinate on your bed because it hides their scent in your – what the dog considers to be – the smell of their protector and companion. This makes Fido feel less exposed.

Do dogs pee out of spite?

Dogs do not urinate or defecate out of spite or jealousy. The unfamiliar scents and sounds of a new home may be stressing and he feels the need to reaffirm his claim on his territory.

Dogs may pee on your bed for many reasons including a medical condition, excitement, leaving their scent, or because they are anxious. While it’s frustrating, it’s important not to yell at or punish your dog, as that isn’t likely to stop the behavior. Instead, work to pinpoint the reason for the inappropriate urination so you can address it properly.

When a housebroken dog suddenly starts peeing on the bed, there is a good chance a medical condition is to blame. If the problem is ongoing, a medical reason has been ruled out, and you can’t find a solution, enlist the help of an animal behaviorist who can work with you to try and stop the behavior.

Nobody is perfect. Everybody has accidents. And that includes your dog. So why, oh why, does your dog pee on the bed? Is it a straight-up accident or something else?

Instead, try paying attention to your pets body language and spend quality time together, which will help you both better communicate. By jotting down and tracking the times your dog pees and poops, you will identify patterns and be able to put him on a schedule that better suits his needs.

Lastly, dont forget to positively reinforce your dog for going potty where hes supposed to by using treats, pets, or praise. It doesnt work to shout at your dog or rub his nose in pee; all it will do is scare him and tear at the bond between you. If the pee has reached the mattress, blot the area with paper towels or a cleaning cloth to soak up as much moisture as possible, but avoid wiping, which can spread the stain.

Once youve blotted the area, you can try spreading baking soda over top, which will help soak up moisture.

It’s important to consult your pet’s veterinarian with any medical concerns, and before making any changes or adding supplements to your pet’s health plan.

If it happens regularly, try to identify potential triggers that might have set him off, such as a loud noise, an unfamiliar face, or you stepping out the door. Many canines who are threatened or stressed will resort to this behavior, usually as a response to a new arrival in the home, like a baby or another pet.

A dog wetting the bed may be cause for a medical concern, so if your pet has made a habit out of it, maybe it’s time for a visit to the veterinarian. Frequent and uncontrollable elimination can also be indicative of other conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, bladder stones, arthritis, and kidney disease. The easiest way to stop your pup from relieving himself at a specific spot is by cleaning the pee with a cleaner like Charlie & Max Pet Odor and Stain Eliminator .

Why Dogs Pee on the Bed

There are several possible reasons your dog is peeing on your bed. It’s important to begin by ruling out medical causes before you try to address potential behavioral problems.

Urinary Tract or Kidney Problems

Urinary tract infections commonly cause dogs to have urinary accidents. Your vet may need a urine sample to run a urinalysis. If your dog does have a UTI, antibiotics will be needed to clear it up. Other issues with the urinary tract can make it difficult for dogs to control bladder activity.Other possible urinary problems seen in dogs include cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), crystals in the urine, bladder stones, structural abnormalities, kidney disease, and even tumors. Most urinary issues can be treated with medications, supplements, or diet changes. In more extreme cases, issues like bladder stones may require surgery.Certain diseases like diabetes and Cushing’s disease can affect the urinary tract, as well.

Incontinence

Dogs with urinary incontinence will leak urine involuntarily. This may occur only while the dog is asleep, but some dogs with incontinence will dribble urine while they are awake as well. Incontinence is relatively common in senior dogs, but certain conditions can cause incontinence in young dogs, as well. Hormone-responsive urinary incontinence is not uncommon in female dogs and may even affect males though more rare. Fortunately, medications are available to help.

Housetraining Issues

Is your dog fully housetrained? Some dogs will appear to be mostly housetrained but then will find a favorite place to relieve themselves indoors. This may be your bed! If you think housetraining is the issue, then it’s time to work more with your dog on training.

Excitement, Fear, Stress, or Anxiety

Excitement urination is common in younger dogs. They tend to dribble some urine when they are overly excited or are put in a submissive position. Many dogs grow out of this behavior, but some will need training if it continues into adulthood.Fear, stress, and anxiety can all cause a dog to urinate inappropriately. Changes to your dog‘s environment may explain sudden stress. However, underlying medical conditions also cause stress to your dog. Rule out health problems first, then try to reduce your dog‘s stress as much as possible.

Territorial Marking

Some dogs are more territorial than others. Many like to mark their territory with urine. However, when they do this to your bed, it becomes a major problem for you. Territorial marking can be minimized through training and behavior modification.

Have More

So you’ve had to strip your bed more times than you’d like this week, and you’ve considered buying stock in urine odor removal products. Whether a new puppy or a dog you’ve had for years, it’s just plain frustrating when your dog urinates where he shouldn’t—especially when it’s on your bed.Here are some things to consider:If the problem is ongoing, a medical reason has been ruled out, and you can’t find a solution, enlist the help of an animal behaviorist who can work with you to try and stop the behavior. In the meantime, consider locking the pet out of your bedroom, or only allowing the pet in your bedroom while on a leash or in a crate so he can’t get on your bed. This will protect your bedding and mattress until you are able to resolve the issue.

Understanding Dog Behavior

Once your dog gets a clean bill of health from the vet, it’s time to try to figure out why your dog is peeing the bed.Although it’s tempting to assume your dog is peeing on your bed on purpose to “get back at you,” canines aren’t known for being vindictive!Instead, try paying attention to your pet’s body language and spend quality time together, which will help you both better communicate. Ask yourself if you’ve honestly completely and fully house-trained your dog. Could he be telling you he needs a refresher course?If your dog is a puppy or newly adopted, this could be doubly true. Is he going out to relieve himself enough times during the day? By jotting down and tracking the times your dog pees and poops, you will identify patterns and be able to put him on a schedule that better suits his needs.Think about hiring a dog walker in your area if you’re not able to handle the potty breaks required for a day.Iif your dog is only peeing in the house, and especially if you have an unaltered male dog, your pet could actually be “marking” his territory. In that case, neutering often helps alleviate the behavior.Lastly, don’t forget to positively reinforce your dog for going potty where he’s supposed to by using treats, pets, or praise. And please, skip the punishment. It doesn’t work to shout at your dog or rub his nose in pee; all it will do is scare him and tear at the bond between you. Nobody wants that.

How to Clean Dog Pee

The trouble with potty accidents is that the pee scent lingers. Not just for you, but also for your dog. That ongoing scent of pee acts as a kind of invitation, reminding your dog to “go here!”To break the cycle, clean as quickly as possible, as the sooner you clean it the less deep it’ll go. Sheets can go in the wash. If the pee has reached the mattress, blot the area with paper towels or a cleaning cloth to soak up as much moisture as possible, but avoid wiping, which can spread the stain.People recommend different products for cleaning. Once you’ve blotted the area, you can try spreading baking soda over top, which will help soak up moisture. After an hour, vacuum it up.Alternately, you can try to reduce the scent by rubbing watered-down vinegar on the stain.If homemade products aren’t working, your local pet store will also have products designed to reduce the scent of dog pee.

Your Pup’s Bathroom Needs Have Been Neglected

Nothing may be wrong, even if there’s been a peeing incident. Perhaps, your adult pooch simply never learned all the rules of potty training. Despite the popular belief in old dogs and new tricks, even adult pooches can be housetrained with time and patience.Another reason for the bed peeing accident may be the lack of ample bathroom breaks. If you’ve been leaving for long periods without popping in every few hours, it’s not so strange to discover a puddle of pee in the house.Take now that puppies typically need to relieve themselves every two hours, and even older canines should be let out at least three to five times a day.

Dog Anxiety, Stress, or Fear

Stinky accidents like these may be a drag for you, but it’s probably worse for little Fido. Peeing and pooping in strange places can be linked to a dog‘s emotional distress. The reason for their distress can be as easy to identify as thunderstorms or a new house guest, but it can also be as innocuous as a change in the house such as a new piece of furniture.When dogs are stressed, it can cause them to lose control of their bladder temporarily. If they’re scared of something, it’s also possible that they’re eliminating on the bed because they’re too afraid to go to their usual spot. Separation anxiety is also linked to dogs urinating in the house.Observe your pup closely in the hours after his little accident. If it happens regularly, try to identify potential triggers that might have set him off, such as a loud noise, an unfamiliar face, or you stepping out the door. Treats for relaxation and anxiety relief may help him settle down and feel more at ease, especially at nighttime.

Marking Territory

One of the most common reasons is marking behavior. If your dog is peeing in various places around the house in small amounts, he might be claiming his territory instead of urinating to relieve himself.While this behavior is more common among male dogs, it’s not unheard of among female dogs. Many canines who are threatened or stressed will resort to this behavior, usually as a response to a new arrival in the home, like a baby or another pet. It’s also more common among pups that haven’t been spayed or neutered.

Medical Reasons

A dog wetting the bed may be cause for a medical concern, so if your pet has made a habit out of it, maybe it’s time for a visit to the veterinarian. Incontinence or reduced bladder control is one of the symptoms of urinary tract infection, a painful bacterial infection that can be treated with antibiotics.Frequent and uncontrollable elimination can also be indicative of other conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, bladder stones, arthritis, and kidney disease.