Why Is My Dogs Eye Swollen?

Blepharitis refers to inflammation of the eyelids and the tissues in and around the eye. It can be a painful condition and, if not diagnosed and treated properly, can result in vision problems.

Commonly with blepharitis, a dog will rub or scratch at its face or eyelids due to irritation. Allergies : Adverse reactions to a specific food, inhalant, medication, environmental factors, or an insect bite (these are the most common causes)

Congenital abnormalities: Blepharitis is more common in breeds with excessive facial skin folds and other features such as eyelashes that grow inward or through the eyelid Blepharitis can affect any dog at any age, but there are certain breeds that are at a higher risk, including those with prominent facial folds, long and narrow muzzles, or short flat faces. The first thing your vet will do is gather a complete medical history, including the symptoms and any possible incidents that may have brought on the condition.

Next, your dog will receive a full medical examination, along with a biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and complete blood count. An eye exam will help determine the severity of the condition and the degree of involvement of the eyelid. If no specific cause is found, additional blood work may be required to find evidence of systemic disease.

The eye is comprised of many different types of tissue, which makes it susceptible to a wide variety of diseases, but also allows it to provide important clues about what is going on inside the body. If you suspect your dog has blepharitis, have him examined as soon as possible, so your vet can run the tests necessary to determine the underlying cause and best course of action. If none is found, you may be instructed to simply apply warm compresses to the eye several times a day.

In cases of inflammation due to a fungus, bacteria, or parasite, your vet will prescribe medication. These may include eye drops or a topical ointment to help cure the infection, treat the inflammation, and reduce your dogs pain and discomfort. If an allergen is the underlying cause, especially in cases of food allergies, a new diet plan could be prescribed.

Additionally, home remedies can be helpful in alleviating the progression and severity, especially if theyre applied early on. Gently splash onto the affected eye and clean with a cotton pad, removing any debris or discharge. Apply cooled chamomile tea to a cotton ball and clean the affected eye.

Always make the tea is completely cooled, as the eye area will be extremely sensitive. Similarly, if a tumor causing blepharitis is surgically removed, chances for a full recovery are good. If the blepharitis is the result of a hereditary abnormality, its best not to breed and risk passing the condition on to the next generation.

What can I give my dog for swollen eye?

If the conjunctivitis is caused by allergies, your dog may be prescribed antihistamines in order to reduce the inflammation. If the condition is caused by a bacterial or viral infection, your dog may be administered oral antibiotics and eye drops to reduce the symptoms and eliminate the cause.

What can cause swollen eyes in dogs?

Allergies..Glaucoma..Conjunctivitis – viral or bacterial..A foreign object in the eye..Fungal infection..Parasites..A scratched cornea..Tear duct issues (Cocker Spaniels and Poodles are especially prone to this)

How do you treat a dog's irritated eye?

Depending on the cause, treatment can include: removing the irritant and soothing the area with pain medication; antibiotics and saline washes to manage infection ; surgery to treat duct problems or birth defects; antihistamines for allergies; or other medications.

Can dog conjunctivitis heal on its own?

While non-infectious conjunctivitis is not a serious condition in and of itself, it won’t clear up on its own without treatment, and it may point to a more serious health problem that needs to be addressed. Additionally, if left untreated, your dog could sustain a permanent eye injury or even vision loss.

Sources used at the time of publication are provided in the Notes and References section. These may include peer-reviewed scientific research, data from government health authorities, and other trusted sources of information.

Although the cause of swollen eyes in dogs may be mild or severe, it should always be taken seriously to avoid any further complications. Injury or trauma may cause the eye to swell as a natural response, no matter how intense or slight.

Corneal ulcers are painful open sores on the cornea that can develop due to an injury or infection in the dogs eye. Eyelash and eyelid disorders (such as entropion ) that cause the lids and/or lashes to rub against the eyes can result in irritation, redness and swelling. The condition may be identified by cloudy eyes, lethargy and major swelling or bulging of the eyeball (among other symptoms).

Dont hesitate to see a veterinarian for an exam to pinpoint the cause, additional symptoms and appropriate treatment for the condition. Treating a swollen eye in your dog may be simple or complex and all depends on what caused the swelling. Topical and oral antibiotics may be used to treat certain conditions that caused a swollen eye in your dog.

Glaucoma may be treated with special anti-glaucoma eye drops, and analgesics are often prescribed to help soothe the pain that occurs with the condition. Uveitis and other eye conditions that cause swelling due to inflammation are often treated with a prescribed topical or oral anti-inflammatory medication. Extreme trauma that resulted in eye swelling and other side effects could require surgery in order to heal properly.

Artificial tears can also help to flush the eyes of dirt and debris to prevent further irritation. Talk to your vet about other potential remedies for allergies, like oral antihistamines (Benadryl or Zyrtec), before giving any to your dog. Blepharitis in dogs can be caused by infections, allergies, tumors and other eye conditions, and is often treated with a warm compress to relieve inflammation.

This helps with comfort and prevents buildup that could cause irritation or other problems that may lead to swollen eyes. This is the best way to keep your dogs eyes in good condition, and ensure their overall health is in top shape. Sometimes, what starts out as mild swelling can lead to major issues that would have been more easily treated if caught early on.

Eye infections can occur in your dog when you least expect itand they may be difficult to spot. When you notice redness or discharge in your dogs eye, how can you tell if its allergies, an infection, injury, or irritation? As a veterinarian at the University of Southern California, Id like to share with you how to spot the signs of a dog eye infection, along with causes, treatments, prevention, and when to see your vet.

This is because if the eye is infected with bacteria then the immune system will react with inflammation (discharge, redness, and/or swelling), which can also be painful (causing pawing and squinting). Via Veterinary Vision, Inc. Bacterial infections can also result from unwelcomed visitors entering your dogs eye.

These items can get lodged under your dogs third eyelid (the dotted T-shaped organ in the diagram above) and cause irritation and infection unless removed. Home remedies such as non-medicated sterile saline rinses can flush the eye but are only a short-term solution if your dog already has an infection. Shop on Amazon You can also use a warm, moist towel to gently clean discharge from the corners of your dogs eyes and facial area.

If the object is something larger and potentially injurious, removal may require special tools or sedation, which should be done at the vets office. If you continue to see signs of irritation, swelling, and redness after rinsing your dogs eye, then its time to see your veterinarian. After performing an ophthalmic exam and some specific eye diagnostics, your vet may also prescribe topical antibiotics for you to administer to your dog if she suspects a bacterial infection.

Since dogs are often playful and energetic in environments with opportunistic organisms, preventing eye infections can be difficult. While your dog may prefer his nose to see the world, the eyes give an important window into his health, too.

Blepharitis can affect one or both eyes. The affected eyelid will usually be red, swollen, and itchy. The dog may squint or blink spasmodically (called blepharospasm). Often the dog will scratch or rub at its face or eyelids leading to secondary trauma to the surrounding tissues. There may be a discharge from the eye that may be clear, mucoid, or purulent (containing pus). If the inflammation has been present for a significant amount of time, there may be loss of pigment or hair.

Common causes of blepharitis include congenital abnormalities, allergies, infections, tumors, and occasionally other inflammatory disorders. Other causes of blepharitis include trauma to the eyelids, localized mange (caused by either Demodex or Sarcopes mites), nutritional disorders such as zinc-responsive dermatitis or fatty acid deficiency, diseases such as hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease, or diabetes mellitus, and environmental irritants such as tobacco smoke.

Your veterinarian may also collect samples of cells or secretions to look for evidence of an infectious agent such as bacteria, fungi, or mites. Samples may be sent to a diagnostic laboratory for culture and sensitivity testing to determine the type of treatment that is needed. “Your veterinarian may also collect samples of cells or secretions to look for evidence of an infectious agent such as bacteria, fungi, or mites.”

If there is no obvious reason for the blepharitis, your veterinarian will recommend blood tests to look for evidence of an underlying disease. Your veterinarian may recommend short-term symptomatic treatment for the inflammation, such as application of warm compresses for 5-15 minutes several times per day and removal of any discharge from the eye.

Trusted Content

This article was written or reviewed by an All About Vision expert contributor, a partner medical reviewer or a member of our medical advisory board.Sources used at the time of publication are provided in the Notes and References section. These may include peer-reviewed scientific research, data from government health authorities, and other trusted sources of information.

Why is my dog’s eye swollen?

Your dog’s eye may be swollen for one of several reasons, from indoor and outdoor allergies, to glaucoma or tumors — both benign and cancerous. Although the cause of swollen eyes in dogs may be mild or severe, it should always be taken seriously to avoid any further complications.Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible if your dog’s eye (or eyes) is swollen.

Symptoms

A number of factors can contribute to swollen eyes in dogs. These can range from irritation brought on by allergies to more serious conditions such as glaucoma or eye tumors.Some underlying causes of a dog’s swollen eye are mild and easily treated, while some can be a sign of a severe problem in your dog’s eyes. Don’t hesitate to see a veterinarian for an exam to pinpoint the cause, additional symptoms and appropriate treatment for the condition.

Treatment

Treating a swollen eye in your dog may be simple or complex and all depends on what caused the swelling. Remedies may include antibiotics, special medications or surgery, as well as some home or over-the-counter solutions.

Special medications

Topical and oral antibiotics may be used to treat certain conditions that caused a swollen eye in your dog.

Swollen eyes vs. blepharitis

Swollen eyeis a broad term, as a swollen eye may be caused by various disorders and conditions in dogs. This may occur in or around the eye, and the location varies based on what triggered it.Blepharitis, on the other hand, is inflammation of the dog’s eyelid specifically. It is not a condition on its own, but a symptom of a more serious eye problems. Blepharitis in dogs can be caused by infections, allergies, tumors and other eye conditions, and is often treated with a warm compress to relieve inflammation. Discharge should also be removed during the treatment process.A swollen eye can be difficult to differentiate from blepharitis, but both should be looked at and treated professionally. Either condition could indicate a more serious problem that requires treatment tailored specifically to your dog’s case.

Prevention

Inspect your dog’s eyes daily for abnormalities and to ensure that they are functioning well. Wipe away any discharge with clean hands and a clean cloth or paper towel to keep the area clear and dry. This helps with comfort and prevents buildup that could cause irritation or other problems that may lead to swollen eyes.If your dog is prone to eye problems, caring for their eyes is even more vital. Some dogs may need extra attention on the state of their eyes, such as administering artificial tears to help prevent dryness or routinely keeping their eyes clean and clear.Finally, be sure to see your veterinarian regularly for routine checkups. This is the best way to keep your dog’s eyes in good condition, and ensure their overall health is in top shape.

Nutri-Vet Eye Rinse For Dogs

This eye solution for dogs is made with boric acid to gently reduce eye irritations and flush out debris.

Causes of Dog Eye Infections

Common signs and symptoms of an eye infection in dogs include:You will usually see multiple signs occur at once, like a red, squinty eye. This is because if the eye is infected with bacteria then the immune system will react with inflammation (discharge, redness, and/or swelling), which can also be painful (causing pawing and squinting).Dogs with allergies, a corneal ulcer, dry eye, or trauma could look similar to this, so it’s important to have your dog undergo a complete ophthalmologic exam if you’re concerned.

What about viral eye infections?

Canine distemper virus can cause a viral eye infection. Viral infections are usually self-limiting unless accompanied by a secondary bacterial infection.As a dog owner, you don’t need to be worried about viral infections if you get your dog regularly vaccinated. Viral infections in the eye can look like bacterial infections eventually, but with viral infections, you might notice other additional signs also such as lethargy, nasal discharge, and a fever.

Treating Dog Eye Infections at Home

You can provide supportive care at home to help with your pet’s comfort level.Home remedies such as non-medicated sterile saline rinses can flush the eye but are only a short-term solution if your dog already has an infection. Saline rinses are a good idea if you’re seeing just a little clear discharge and a little redness. It’s importantI recommend either Tomlyn Sterile Eye Wash for Dogs and Cats or Nutri-Vet Eye Rinse Liquid for Dogs when flushing a dog’s eye at home. Be sure to use a clean cotton ball after rinsing to catch and wipe the drainage. Refrain from touching the eye with the nozzle tip, your hands, or the cotton ball.

Nutri-Vet Eye Rinse For Dogs

This eye solution for dogs is made with boric acid to gently reduce eye irritations and flush out debris.You can also use a warm, moist towel to gently clean discharge from the corners of your dog’s eyes and facial area.If you’ve eliminated the possibility of eye infections in your dog but don’t like the unsightly tear staining that’s a normal part of eye discharge, you can give your dog Angel’s chews to minimize the staining on the face.

When to See Your Vet

If you continue to see signs of irritation, swelling, and redness after rinsing your dog’s eye, then it’s time to see your veterinarian.After performing an ophthalmic exam and some specific eye diagnostics, your vet may also prescribe topical antibiotics for you to administer to your dog if she suspects a bacterial infection. These will be relatively easy for you to administer at home.

What is the treatment for blepharitis?

Any condition that can cause irritation of the eyelids can lead to blepharitis. Common causes of blepharitis include congenital abnormalities, allergies, infections, tumors, and occasionally other inflammatory disorders.Congenital eyelid abnormalities that can predispose a dog to developing blepharitis includeThe shape of a dog’s muzzle and face may predispose a dog to developing blepharitis. Dogs with prominent facial folds, extremely long and narrow muzzles, and dogs with short flat faces and bulging eyes (lagophthalmos) are more prone to developing this problem.Allergies to insect bites, inhalant allergens, or food may cause blepharitis. Bacterial infections may cause localized abscesses of glands in the eyelids or generalized infections of the eyelids. In some cases, infection withLocalized blepharitis may be caused by aBlepharitis caused by tumors typically originate in the meibomian glands in dogs. These tumors may be benign ‘sebaceous adenomas’ or malignant ‘sebaceous denocarcinomas’. Another type of tumor, called a ‘mast cell tumor’ may also cause blepharitis.Other causes of blepharitis include trauma to the eyelids, localized mange (caused by eitherIn some cases, no underlying cause can be determined; this is called idiopathic blepharitis.