Why Is My Dog Suddenly Pooping in the House?

You thought that you had your four-legged friend house trained, maybe even for years. Then, he or she suddenly starts having accidentsin the house. Why is your dog suddenly pooping in the house at night? And how do you help him or her understand that they need to stop?

Why all of a sudden is my dog pooping in the house?

This could be due to weakening muscles with age, or possibly even a mental condition such as canine cognitive dysfunction—a medical issue similar to human Alzheimer’s disease. Your dog also may have developed a health problem that is causing him or her to be unable to control pooping indoors. … Inflammatory bowel disease.

Do dogs poop in the house out of spite?

Do Dogs Poop Inside Out Of Spite? No, dogs do not poop inside out of spite. This is just a reason people come up with because we assume dogs view the world the same way us humans do. Sometimes, it will seem like your dog poops in the house to revenge for something you did.

What do you do if your dog poops in the house?

Immediately interrupt him by clapping and saying “Ah ah!”.Get the dog outside as soon as possible (carry him whenever possible and put the leash on the dog as you head to the door).

Inappropriate elimination is a common problem for dogs for a number of potential reasons and can indicate a behavioral issue or medical condition. Understanding your dogs behaviors is the first step in preventing your dog from pooping in the house. A new dog or puppy may not yet have the necessary training to know the proper time and place for elimination. However, if your house-trained dog is suddenly pooping inside you need to discover the reason, be it behavioral or medical. Some of the reasons for pooping inside may include:

Pooping in the house can be frustrating, but it is important to get to the root cause of the issue, especially with a fully house-trained companion. As a pet owner, you should consider any new potential stressors and be aware of all changes in your dogs behaviors and health.

Compare plans Despite what seems obvious to you, dogs do not make a distinction between inside and outside when choosing a spot to eliminate waste. Puppies and new dogs introduced into your family lack the knowledge of your schedule and therefore, their opportunities to poop outside. Introducing new routines or even new food into your dogs life may upset his schedule and result in pooping inside.

Separation anxiety does not have an underlying medical condition but affects dogs who are keenly attached to their owners. When you leave home, your dog may feel it acutely and act out by pooping in the house, becoming destructive, or vocalizing. If your dog is having soiling issues in the house, he may have an underlying medical condition brought on by a parasitic, viral, or bacterial infection.

Infections that cause the digestive tract to become inflamed will cause your dog to have diarrhea, and he may feel a sense of urgency to poop. Similar to parasites and other infections, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a medical condition that may be affecting your dog, especially if he has loose stool or diarrhea. Unlike temporary symptoms, IBD is a chronic condition and can be severe.

Your dog may experience muscular atrophy of the sphincter leading to an inability to hold waste. Though muscle wasting can occur at any age, it is more common in older dogs. The inability to keep the muscles controlling your dogs waste could be the result of a general weakness in your dog, a degenerative nervous system disorder, or senility.

However, if your previously house-trained dog is suddenly pooping inside you should schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to rule out any possible medical conditions. Ask yourself if you or a family member has made any recent changes to schedules, feeding and walking times. Your dogs stressor may be apparent, such as a new home for the family or subtle, like you working a little later than normal.

Being patient is crucial for re-training inappropriate soiling behavior, and you should never scold your dog or rub his nose in the poop. As a dog owner, you should be on the lookout for medically related house soiling. Diarrhea, temporary or chronic, is a sign that your dog is unwell and not getting their proper nutrients.

Tissue samples and blood work will help identify potential infections or parasites as the cause. Anti-inflammatory medication may also be prescribed to help control the inflammation and get your dog back to health. You can help reduce house soiling during training or re-training by creating and sticking to a scheduled routine of feeding and walking your dog.

Throwing out waste may seem like the logical thing to do but creating a chemical and scent association will help him remember where the proper place to poop is. Feed an easily digestible diet and steer clear of treats and table scraps. Getting to the root of the medical condition will also determine future efforts for keeping your dog healthy.

may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. It may help to make sure that he is fed on a schedule, so that his stomach is not full all the time. If you are not sure that your dog is having a bowel movement outside, sometimes it can help to take them for an actual walk rather than just let them out in the yard.

Even the best-behaved dog can go No. 2 in the house sometimes. If it happens more often than usual, your furry friend may have a problem. Illness, aging, and emotional issues could be to blame. But you should consider those causes only if you know your dog is housetrained — in your home.

Older dogs often have fecal incontinence, or a lack of bowel control. It may be painful for them to posture to poop (the squatting position can be uncomfortable with any joint or muscle changes).

Signs include scratching at doors and windows, destructive chewing, howling or whining, and going potty inside the house. Dont make a big deal about leaving the house or coming home. Loud noises, from the rumble of thunder to the boom and crack of fireworks, are common triggers.

While you cant stop the sounds outside, you can train your dog be calmer when they hear loud noises. Provide treats or other rewards so they associate that space with happy things, not scary sounds. Play fetch with a tennis ball, offer a new squeaky toy, or practice commands with treats.

Pet Health Network: Gastroenteritis in Dogs, “Canine Degenerative Myelopathy: It’s in the DNA.

If your dog has started pooping inside the house, you may be wondering just what is going on in his headespecially if he’s house-trained and has had the whole potty routine down for a while now.

Dr. Amanda Nascimento, DMV, MVSc, Ph.D., explains, “Dogs cant talk to us to tell us whats wrong, so we have to look at their behavior and other signals that may alert us. There are many things that could be causing this behaviorranging from mental to physical to situationalso you may need to do some investigative work in order to figure out the exact trigger.

Dogs that are fully house-trained may suddenly start soiling in the house due to medical conditions. If medical conditions are ruled out, examine whether you have recently moved, changed schedules, or introduced a new pet or baby to the home. Sometimes, dogs poop and pee due to loss of control when they feel scared or extremely stressed out.

Overstimulation During Potty Time Fear and Anxiety Changes in Schedule Poor Diet Past Accidents That Weren’t Thoroughly Cleaned Up Substrate Preference Separation Anxiety Old Age Recent Changes Like New Pets or Family Members Being Inside for Too Long Medical Condition In many cases, the problem of a dog peeing or pooping after coming inside may stem from the environment outside the house. Have you ever had a moment after being out shopping with friends when you felt an irresistible urge to go only once you inserted the keys and turned the doorknob?

With all this sensory overload and the excitement of stretching their legs, dogs can get distracted to the point of forgetting that they need to go potty. Once he goes potty, calmly praise (making sure you don’t interrupt him) and reward him and let him spend some time in the yard playing and exploring before going back inside. A dog who senses danger will typically want to be on all four legs ready to spring into action.

On top of that, dogs who pee or poop leave traces of themselves behind, which can put them in a vulnerable position if they feel threatened by something. If you have recently rescued a fearful dog, it may be worth it to temporarily train him to use pads inside until he has adjusted to the changes and has more confidence. Feeding your dog and taking her outside at the same times every day is a good way to prevent unexpected accidents.

Adult dogs tend to go first thing in the morning, at midday, in the early evening, and right before going to bed. A sudden change in your dog‘s life or schedule can cause anxiety, which may result in him relieving himself as a reaction. A change in schedule might also mean eating and drinking at odd times, which can make bowel movements unpredictable.

Feeding your puppy or dog at the same times each day and keeping their routine the same can translate to predictable “outings.” Feeding your dog cheap food from your supermarket may yield more frequent and bulkier bowel movements. For this reason, premium dog food, even though it is more expensive, is preferable, as more nutrients are absorbed, and less waste is produced as a result.

Sudden diet changes may also cause an upset stomach and a sense of urgency, especially if you have switched to a lower-grade food with lots of fillers and grains. Most commercial brands contain fillers, meat or fish by-products, animal fat, liver meal, BHA, BHT, and other chemicals and additives. Sprinkle a generous amount of baking soda onto the area, making sure to cover the entire spot.

Alternatively, Nature’s Miracle is a wonderful product known for eliminating traces of odors courtesy of its enzymes. Separation anxiety can cause a number of strange behaviors in dogs, including defacation. If you come home from work and find messes around the house, your dog may suffer from separation anxiety.

Signs of anxiety and distress include whining, pacing, barking, howling, panting, digging, and pooping. If it can’t be helped, have a neighbor, family member, or friend visit during the day to feed and walk the dog. You can also use a service like Wag to hire someone to visit your house during the day to take your dog on a walk.

Be sure that when you are at home with your dog, you give him plenty of exercise and mental stimulation in the form of games and outdoor play. You can also try leaving your dog a yummy bone to chew on or hide treats around the house so that he has something to occupy him while you’re away. 60% of dogs between the ages of 11 and 16 display some signs of cognitive dysfunction according to a 2019 study published in the journal, “Frontiers in Neuroscience.”

Feed your dog at regular times every day and take him outdoors to potty before or after each meal. Some intestinal disorders may cause a sense of urgency and more frequent stools, making it harder for your dog to hold it in. Intestinal worms Parasites Pain squatting Pain lifting leg Bladder infection Kidney stones Kidney failure Liver diseases Cushing’s syndrome Addison’s disease Dietary allergies or reactions

If it is exclusively a night-time issue, and your dog is not old and spends plenty of time outdoors, I would recommend visiting your vet immediately to determine whether the behavior has a medical cause. Even if your dog poops right after being scolded, resist the temptation to assign human motivations to the act. If your dog spends plenty of time outside but still poops indoors, chances are he may feel somewhat uncomfortable outside.

If it’s a matter of overstimulation and stress, try taking your dog to calmer, more secluded areas to play and potty, and be sure to reinforce outdoor pooping with praise and a treat. It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Answer: If your Great Dane was always remarkable in the potty training department, and now is having accidents, it may be that there’s a medical problem at play.

This way you can promptly escort her out as soon as you notice some pre-potty signs (circling, sniffing, lowering her bottom). It may help to have a health check-up and determine if any changes may have caused stress or fear (loud noises, new people moving in, etc.) If none apply, you may need to go back to basics and restrict his space to the area where his pee pad is, and praise or reward him for using it.

Question: My dog is a year and a half old, and I clean his litter pan monthly. If you are using an invisible fence, that sometimes can trigger some dogs to avoid pooping outside because of negative associations with the yard. Sometimes, the behavior can be due to the dog feeling cold outside and not wanting to stay long in the yard.

Dogs with low thyroid levels may resent being outside due to feeling more cold than usual so they may want to go back inside fast. Question: I have a 5-month-old puppy and he has no trouble going to the toilet outside but he still pees and poos inside even though he’s taking out several times a day how can I stop this? Question: Our 12 year old Pyrenees is having hip issues and starting to poop when he stands up, as if he has no feeling.

It would be a good starting point to have your vet assess his health and rule out possible medical issues. It may help to keep the two separated when the puppy is overly exuberant (if your older dog shows signs of stress) and maintain the min pin’s usual routine. Keep a close eye on your min pin and an unobstructed view so that you can recognize signs he needs to potty and escort him to the yard/potty area immediately and praise/reward for going there.

Most dogs won’t soil their sleeping areas, and by keeping her in the crate she will likely avoid peeing in it or give you enough warning to take her outside at night. However lately Ive been letting her out at night around 11 to do her business and I always give her half an hour, but then for the past week I have been waking up to poo on the floor. Answer: If they were kept in a cage previously, this could have helped them “hold it” better considering that dogs have a tendency to not want to soil where they sleep.

Answer: You can try removing the couch in question or covering the part he sleeps on with books or other items. Also, aim on training him to go potty on command so that you’ll help eliminate the need to pee or poop in the evening. Rachel and Sam, any type of stress or anxiety can surely play a number on dogs and cause them to have accidents.

My dog is 6 years old, a 50-60lb mutt of some kind ( I think he may actually be inbred.. he was a rescue from a humane society). I have noticed recently that his rear left leg is rarely being used, hell limp around the house, never crying or whining, and wont put weight on it unless absolutely necessary. Our 2 year old pitbull started jumping the fence and going to bathroom inside our house for the past 2 months.

A recent study has come out showing that dogs suffering from canine atopic dermatitis were found to exhibit several problematic behaviors as a result of their intense itching. Affected dogs were also found to be less trainable, possibly due to sleep deprivation and associated stress. Hi, I have a 4 year old Shih Tzu called Bailey, she has been perfectly toilet trained in the house and we’ve never had any issues.

I am wondering if this itching and licking maybe causing some form of stress, she has gone to the toilet whilst we are in the house and often passes her matt (Which she has used for ages) to go. Hi Ashley, any time a dog starts pooping in the home out of the blue, it us important to rule out medical conditions and then after that, we can consider other predisposing factors such as separation anxiety, stress, fear of outdoor noises etc. My pup is 8months old and honestly only had two accidents in the house.. she is let out while Im at work my a friend to go potty, but Ive notice here recently she has started pooping in my dining room even after just being outside?

The goal her would be putting your puppy on a feeding schedule (dogs fed meals twice a day, morning and evening are more likely to poop at certain times of the day, keep tabs on that), taking her out before she has a chance to poop, and training her to go potty on command https://pethelpful.com/dogs/How-to-Train-a-Dog-to-… When schools closed and we were all in the house more we started taking long walks each day giving her some time off leash. In fact, she wouldnt poop at all on days we didnt let her off leash, no matter how often we took her to her gated area in the yard.

We think she was waiting for us to fall asleep, poop, then eat the evidence : ( We had her stool tested and everything was healthy. I have a 9 year old French Mastiff that suddenly started having bowel movement all over the house nightly. It could be stress playing a role as being dropped off in a new place and being given a bath, restrained and using odd tools around them can be scary.

Of course, there may be other things going on, but going to the groomers can play a role as many dogs act a bit different when they return. Have adopted a 2yrs old dog almost 2 months ago and despite all the walks during the day, he keeps pooping during the night. Now with the Covid19 we are in voluntary quarantine ( almost 2 months now ), but the other day I had some errands and left home for 2 hours when we came back and open the fence the dogs get access to the whole house , 1hr later we found poop in two rooms .

Perhaps the doggy door flap startled her, maybe she saw something scary, maybe she felt pain outside for some reason and now feels safer going inside. Regardless, make sure to clean accidents in the home with an enzyme-based cleaner, keep her in area where you can carefully monitor without obstructed views and coax her quickly outside at the first sign of needing to go potty. I would call the dog food company and see if there any recalls or changes in ingredients and also would google online whether people are having similar issues with the brand.

In the meanwhile, I would keep her in a room near the outside door with plain view (no furniture obstructing) so that you can take her promptly out as soon as you see her squatting. I have a very well trained 6 year old German shepherd x American staffy and just recently she has been pooping inside non stop, I’ve cleaned the area thoroughly, fed her earlier, taken her outside shortly after feeding, a couple of hours before bed, and then again just before bed and she still does it, she doesn’t have anxiety as nothing in my household has changed and I’ve lived here for almost 3 years and she always pooped outside but for the past 2 weeks it’s been inside, we have ruled out medical condition as we had her checked just in case… What can I do to stop her from pooping in the house as I’m now at wits end and have no idea what else I can do… Last but not least, clean up indoor accidents with an odor neutralizer and make sure you have a clear view of your dog at all times when you know he is due to pee/poop soon.

We have caught him in the act and corrected, in the moment by quickly moving him outside, only to have him not finish and just play around or sit on his outside bed. We want to prepare him as best as possible for his forever home and we are running out of time because he is a real catch and will be adopted as soon as he’s allowed a meet and greet once the quarantine is lifted. We then started taking him outside on several short walks per day and he was doing his business outside just fine, so much so that we didn’t need potty pads for a bit, and I even dared to put rugs down on our linoleum floors.

Sybsiss, that’s surely an interesting post you have made that goes to show how sensitive some dogs are to changes in their lives. Dogs love routines so it makes sense for their disruptions to cause them some level of stress. I would keep track of when her accidents happen and take her out prior to them if there’s a pattern and not returning inside until she poops if possible.

My mom died and I had to take our dog to my sistets because I cant have him where I am staying and he started pooping and peeing in her house is he upset that he hasnt seen me in three months A dog who is well house trained but starts pooping in the home always raises a red flag for some medical issue. Intestinal parasites, colitis, softer stools from a diet change and other GI disorders may sometimes be a culprit.

My parents adopted an 11-yo Yorkie from my aunt a few months ago, and shes very well-adjusted to her new environment, pees and poos outside and everything, even now that winter has come. She has not had this issue before, and Ive allowed her to get used to me and she seems to enjoy my presenceshe climbs into my lap on her own and laid on me or with me all day yesterday while I was working. There has been no change in diet, she should be overall healthy as my folks have been keeping up with her vet trips and any extra needed care, so Im the only outlier.

I would go back to basics and supervise her all the time (unless when crated) and praise reward for going outside.Make sure to clean up any accidents with an an enzyme based cleaner. I know some dogs when pregnant may benefit from the addition of some fiber to their diets, ask your vet though for specific recommendations. Will a pregnant dog start pooping in house if close to her due date she has about two weeks to go so im wondering if its not a pressure thing thank you for your help

Tossing treats to the ground when they first come in may also help remove the focus from the excited greeting. Sometimes these dietary changes may affect the dog‘s gut and cause increased bowel movements or more urgency. Please make sure you don’t scold him for having accidents as that teaches dogs to go potty out of sight and hide.

It may help to make sure you feed him at the same time each day, and I always suggest praising and rewarding for pooping outside. Susan, It sounds like your dog may have be spooked by something or perhaps has something going on medically causing him to associate the outdoors with something unpleasant. My two year old female King charles spaniel has within the last two weeks started to poop and sometimes pee in the dining room.

She’s eating fine, drinking plenty of water, still energetic and playful, and her poop is normal looking. She never “asks” to go out because she is mostly an outdoor dog as we live in VT on 5 acres, I put a GPS collar on her and just watch where she roams. My next step is top trap her upstairs and hope she will bark to let me know she wants to go downstairs to poop!

Any advice would be amazing–I brought her to the vet 3 weeks ago when she first started going into heat and there were no health issues. She had a bland diet when she came home and I kind of kept up with some chicken and rice with her dog food and now she’s peeing and pooping 2 hours later after she already went outside and did the same. Hi my 2 and a half year old dog suddenly started to poop in the house and I dont understand why.

What happens if you keep your dog in another room or in a crate at a distance to enjoy a Kong filled with some goodies? Your vet can prescribe some meds meant to help dogs with thi condition. I have been taking to the Vet he has not mentioned this but, has brought up acupuncture not sure if that would work but, he was going to investigate.Any opinions would greatly be appreciated.

Woke up early today, every day, 6 a, to take him out only to step in poop and drag it all through my bedroom, grrrr. Well the little one is very bossy and temperamental she orders the older dogs around and we have tried to get a upper hand on this but she doesnt seem to want to bend…. shes boss thats all there is to it…… well jude(the mini Australian is very skidish and scared of EVERYTHING well anyways hes potty trained and so is she buy occasionally she will poop in the house why does Jude seem to poop in the house right after her??? We bought a Frenchie last September he’s now 7mths these last few weeks my 5yr old shih tzu has started to poo during the night despite having been outdoors before bedtime.

My almost 3 year old French bulldog has started pooping in the house after his breakfast and sometimes we find one in the morning. I let him outside before he eats so he can go to the toilet, so I dont understand the sudden urge to poop straight after his breakfast. He goes for a long walk late at night before bed, and always goes to the toilet, so Im confused as to why Im finding another poop in the morning all of a sudden.

My fully house trained 1 yr old GSD recently started using the bathroom in areas my kids play and once on her dog bed in the car when we left her for a quick trip in a store. you can tell she isn’t herself anymore, i’m very concerned and i need answers plus solutions for when the dog comes back. i’m aware the service dog was drinking out of her bowl, chewing her toys, laying on her bed, and playing with me.

My 1 year old husky started peeing and pooping in the house everyday he goes outside more than normal he will go outside and use the bathroom then come back in and use it again he resentley chewed up our couch then peed on it. Hes destryoing everything including the carpet from mot only potty but chewing it up or just plain eating it he will sneek itno our room at night and get anything he can chew he ate my sons sock and pooped it out the next day and my wifes brand new never used boots he eats the insoles out of them. We can only be gona not even 10 min and will come back and he would have got on the table and peed on it we are in desprate need of help with him his food and potty time has always been consistant but the past two weeks he has been out of controll

Age-Related Health Problems

If you have a senior dog who has been pooping outside for years, he or she knows they aren’t supposed to poop inside. Thus, he or she is likely facing medical issues that make it impossible for them to hold their bowels all night. You should refer to a vet to find out if the issue is treatable. Even if it is not, you can change your dog’s routine so that he or she eats their last meal earlier in the day and spends five or ten minutes outside right before bed, so he or she has the opportunity to go outside.

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New Foods

Dogs of any age may have trouble keeping to their bathroom schedule if you have recently changed their food or gave them a new treat or some human food. If you’re changing their diet, you can expect their bowels to normalize in about two weeks. To avoid these problems next time, mix the new food with the old one for a few days to help your dog adjust.

New Problems in the Environment

You also need to consider whether your dog’s surroundings have changed to make it harder for him or her to go outside. If you’ve just moved, your dog may be confused about where they are allowed to poop. You should remind them by doing a few training sessions as if you were housetraining them for the first time. Reward them when they poop outside and bring them out frequently.Also, consider if a new appliance or source of noise is preventing you from hearing your dog ask to go outside. Or, if something is physically in their way. For example, if your dog normally scratches on the door to be let out, and you’ve put something in front of the door, they may not know what to do to signal to you that they need to go out.Lastly, also consider if there is a reason your dog may not want to go in the backyard. It’s not uncommon for dogs that got sprayed by a skunk to be scared to go outside, especially at night. Or, maybe a new pool or new garden bed is freaking your dog out. You may need a trainer to help solve this one.

Aging

You may want to start with a call to your vet, especially if your dog’s stools are loose or if they have diarrhea. This could be a sign of gastroenteritis, when their stomach, small or large intestines are inflamed. Possible causes include:There may be other medical reasons your dog poops indoors. That’s why it never hurts to rule out these problems first.

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What can you do? When home, you can limit the mess by letting your dog out more often. When you’re away, hire someone to let them out, and keep them in a part of the house where cleanup is easy.

2. Fear and Anxiety

If your dog is scared of something in the yard or something he encounters during walks, he may not feel comfortable enough to do his business. Perhaps there are too many noises, or perhaps other dogs and people make him feel on edge. When dogs are not comfortable, they tend to hold it in until they are relaxed again. When a dog is over threshold, going potty is the last thing they think about because they may be fearing for their life.At times, dogs who live in yards surrounded by invisible fences, also known as electric fences, may get so fearful of the shock that they become terrified of being outside near the perimeters. In these cases, they just stick to the porch area with a worried look on their face. These dogs are often referred to as “porch sitters.”Going potty puts a dog in a vulnerable position. First of all, it takes time, which can be stressful when every second counts. A dog who senses danger will typically want to be on all four legs ready to spring into action.On top of that, dogs who pee or poop leave traces of themselves behind, which can put them in a vulnerable position if they feel threatened by something. Fearful dogs want to hide as much as they can, becoming small and almost invisible. They may not want to leave traces (like urine or feces) behind, as these may attract predators. Of course, nowadays, there are usually no predators threatening your dog, but those instincts may still prevail.

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If you have recently rescued a fearful dog, it may be worth it to temporarily train him to use pads inside until he has adjusted to the changes and has more confidence.Take your dog outside when things are quiet, if feasible (e.g., avoid going out when the trash truck is around). With the help of a professional, you may want to work on desensitizing your dog to whatever he fears.If you own an electric fence, you may want to take it down and invest in a true fence or walk your dog on a leash to potty. It may take some time to undo the emotional damage. Be patient and use high-value treats.

3. Changes in Schedule

Dogs are creatures of habit, and they may be used to going potty at certain times of the day. They love their routines. Puppies tend to naturally go potty a few minutes after eating, drinking, playing, or napping. Adult dogs tend to go first thing in the morning, at midday, in the early evening, and right before going to bed.Have you ever felt the need to go to the bathroom right before an interview or an exam? A sudden change in your dog‘s life or schedule can cause anxiety, which may result in him relieving himself as a reaction.A change in schedule might also mean eating and drinking at odd times, which can make bowel movements unpredictable. Without 24/7 access to the outdoors, a dog has no choice but to poop when he feels the unpredictable urge to go.Feeding your puppy or dog at the same times each day and keeping their routine the same can translate to predictable “outings.” It’s a lot easier to predict when a dog will need to poop if he is being fed at the same times every day.You should also establish scheduled “potty times.” This means taking your dog outside first thing in the morning, right after meals, and once before bed. Make it clear to your dog that he should do his business first before playing. Keep this schedule consistent, and you’ll likely see an improvement right away.Feeding your dog cheap food from your supermarket may yield more frequent and bulkier bowel movements. For this reason, premium dog food, even though it is more expensive, is preferable, as more nutrients are absorbed, and less waste is produced as a result. This means smaller stools and on a less-frequent basis.Sudden diet changes may also cause an upset stomach and a sense of urgency, especially if you have switched to a lower-grade food with lots of fillers and grains.Dogs prefer eating real food, and if you have the time to make them at home, healthy, vet-approved homemade dog food recipes are a great way to go.If you use kibble, be sure to educate yourself on how to select high-quality dog foods by reading the labels. As a rule of thumb, go with natural, organic brands whenever possible. Most commercial brands contain fillers, meat or fish by-products, animal fat, liver meal, BHA, BHT, and other chemicals and additives. Stay away from these!

Why Does This Happen?

So, if a puppy was trained to pee on paper indoors and then is adopted into a new home where she is expected to pee on grass outdoors, she may seek out surfaces other than grass. She might hold it while outdoors and then use the carpet once she comes back inside.The same goes for older dogs. If your dog is used to eliminating in a kennel or somewhere enclosed, it will take some time for her to get used to using soil or grass during potty time.

How to Deal With It

When adopting a puppy from a pet store, rescue, or breeder, it’s always a good idea to ask exactly what surface was used to let the puppy go potty. If the puppy was trained to use pads or newspaper, you can gradually transition the puppy to grass by taking a piece of newspaper or pad outside and encouraging the puppy to use it. You can then gradually remove the newspaper or pad or reduce its size so more grass is available. Do this repeatedly until the puppy learns to potty exclusively on grass.Some dogs do not do well when they are left alone.

Why Does This Happen?

Dogs are social animals. When they are left alone, they may feel abandoned and not understand the reason why. This causes nervousness, which can lead to urinating or defecating. Some dogs may even suffer from coprophagia, which is when they eat their excrement in order to hide the evidence. Obvious signs of this are bad breath and possible traces of poop left on the floor.

How to Deal With It

Try not to leave your dog alone for more than half a day. If it can’t be helped, have a neighbor, family member, or friend visit during the day to feed and walk the dog. You can also use a service like Wag to hire someone to visit your house during the day to take your dog on a walk.Be sure that when you are at home with your dog, you give him plenty of exercise and mental stimulation in the form of games and outdoor play. You can also try leaving your dog a yummy bone to chew on or hide treats around the house so that he has something to occupy him while you’re away. Check out these additional tips for helping dogs with separation anxiety.Some dogs develop a condition known as ”canine cognitive dysfunction” as they age. This is sort of like the dog version of Alzheimer’s disease. Affected dogs may have a hard time with a variety of tasks, and potty training is one of them. Your dog may forget how to go outside or forget give you signs she needs to go.On the other hand, some older dogs may not have cognitive dysfunction but simply may not be able to hold it in.

How to Deal With It

Anything stressful added to a dog‘s environment may cause a regress in house training. It is not unusual for a well-house-trained dog to have an accident in a new home briefly after moving. A dog may also become upset if a new dog is added to a home or if there are guests or a new baby.

Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQ)

When it comes to house-trained dogs pooping indoors, these four questions are the ones I hear frustrated owners asking most often.