Why Is My Dog So Hyper?

If your dog seems hyper, or overly-excited, the problem likely stems from boredom and a lack of stimulation. So in order to address the problem, you have to assess the way you are interacting with your dog and the kind of activity your dog gets on a daily basis.

How do you calm down a hyper dog?

Don’t Encourage Excitement. ….Encourage Calm Behavior. ….Wear Your Dog Out. ….Provide an Outlet — With Limitations. ….Engage Their Nose. ….Calm Yourself.

What causes a dog to be hyper?

If your dog seems hyper, or overly-excited, the problem likely stems from boredom and a lack of stimulation. So in order to address the problem, you have to assess the way you are interacting with your dog and the kind of activity your dog gets on a daily basis.

What can I give my dog so he's not so hyper?

Ignore Them. One of the easiest ways to calm down a hyper dog is to simply ignore them. ….Distract Them With A Task. Dogs that lack stimulation often go crazy when they finally get to do something. ….Go For A Walk. ….Stay Calm. ….Aromatherapy.

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Or perhaps your dog gets anxious due to separation anxiety or noises like thunderstorms or fireworks , and you find yourself trying to soothe and comfort them to no avail. Besides providing your dog with enough physical exercise appropriate for their age and breed, you can also engage their brain in relaxing activities that satisfy their canine instincts.

Sniffing, licking, and chewing release many feel-good chemicals like serotonin, dopamine, and endorphins in your dog‘s brain. In fact, dogs have a sort of “second nose” that we don’t have the vomeronasal organ, located between the roof of their mouth and their nostrils. This is a perfect enrichment activity for senior dogs who might not be up for more physically demanding walks, but still have energy to burn.

The Difflife is pretty large and has two sides with various “puzzles” to sniff through, while the PAW5 mat is much smaller but with more tightly-packed fabric “grass” perfect for my new puppy to explore. This snuffle mat provides a variety of hiding spots for dry food or treats, encouraging your dog to use their nose to find their meal and helping to slow down eating. And if the weather is nice, you can simply scatter your dog‘s food throughout the grass in your yard for them to sniff out.

I like that the Orbee Ball is made from non-toxic rubber, so when my dog is rolling it around the wood floor or knocking it against the wall, it doesn’t make a lot of noise. You don’t want your dog to turn into a two-ton-wonderbun by overloading them with calories while playing nose work games or using a snuffle mat. Licking releases endorphins and serotonin, which regulate anxiety and help your dog feel calm and less anxious.

You don’t need to spread a whole lot to get a long licking session, so this is a great lower-calorie option instead of a fully stuffed toy or puzzle. Spread a bit of your dog‘s wet food, peanut butter, pureed pumpkin, or low-fat greek yogurt on this mat to provide a soothing enrichment activity. For dogs who get anxious during thunderstorms or fireworks, giving them a lick mat to work on in their safe space during these times can be really helpful to calm them down.

Especially when used in conjunction with other calming aids such as a pheromone diffuser , noise masking with a fan or sound machine, or, in severe cases, prescription anti-anxiety medication. I could scrub, rinse, trim his nails, and clean his ears without him batting an eye – he just wanted to lick up every last bit. After Fozzie Bear’s fantastic bath experience, I went online and immediately ordered a three-pack so we could try the pumpkin and the regular flavor as well.

Giving your dog something to chew helps them stay occupied while you can relax at the end of the day. If you have a super chewer, look for chew toys made from more durable materials like the KONG Extreme or Qwizl from West Paw .

Many pet parents are quick to call their high-energy dog hyperactive, but is that a fair assessment of the dogs behavior? Is an over-the-top drive actually abnormal?

Dogs who have a hard time settling down might be operating under the influence of many factors, like breed drive, a lack of the right kind of stimulation, or a poor diet. Its tempting to tiptoe around when an over-the-top dog finally decides to rest, but its important to acknowledge those moments when hes acting appropriately and taking it easy.

Taking the time to connect positively with your dog when hes calm, like when hes resting in his bed or hanging out quietly near you, will encourage him to perform that behavior more often. Acknowledging your dogs appropriate behavior with quiet praise and a gentle pat will help him understand that when he settles down he receives positive attention from you. Much like eating junk food can alter our moods, feeding your dog a low quality diet can impact his behavior.

Studies have drawn loose correlations between hyperactivity and certain dog food ingredients, so it makes sense to feed your dog a high quality food with pure, easy to identify ingredients, like identifiable meats (no meat byproducts) and minimal fillers and preservatives.

Its one of the most commonly reported behavioral concerns of Canine Good Citizen (CGC) and AKC S.T.A.R. Puppy dog owners. The complaint is that the dog is hyper or too active.

When Karen looked at the plan for a German Shepherd Dog who was jittery and could not focus, she said a light bulb went off.

Ignore the Hyper Dog Behavior

Dogs seek attention from you. By paying attention to the hyper dog during outbursts, you’re reinforcing the very dog problem behavior that you’re trying to eliminate. The next time your dog is jumping or nipping at you in an overexcited way, give it a try — no touch, no talk, no eye contact — and see how you fare. You might be surprised how quickly the dog settles down.

Give Your Dog a Job

Having a task to focus on can help tremendously. Hyperactivity in dogs can come from psychological needs as easily as it can from physical needs. By giving your dog a job to do, you are removing his hyperactive dog behavior and are redirecting his energy elsewhere. For instance, having your dog wear a backpack with extra weight will keep your dog focused on carrying instead of getting distracted by squirrels and other things.

Check Your Own Energy

Your dog is your mirror. Any energy you project, he will reflect back. Are you in a calm assertive state of mind? Are you projecting a confident pack leader energy? Are you stressing out over an argument, or burdened with the worries of the workweek? Nervous or anxious moods can translate into nervous or anxious body language or tones of voice, and can affect the energy of your dog. So be the pack leader and stay in tune with your energy.

Work the Body

First, consider your dog’s exercise requirements versus what he’s actually getting on a daily basis. If you have a high-drive dog from the sporting or herding groups (picture a Border Collie), or even a mixed breed dog who seems to exhibit those same “can’t slow down” tendencies, your dog is going to need a new workout plan and a coach to go with it—that’s you!There is no universal canine exercise standard, but it’s a safe assumption that if your dog is in constant motion and unable to settle down even at the end of the day, he probably needs more exercise than he’s getting. You can vent some of that excess energy by playing focused games with your dog, like tug and fetch. Both games are excellent energy burners, and when they are played with rules they are transformed into mini training exercises.If you want to ramp up the play, consider getting your dog involved in dog sports like agility or lure coursing, which are bound to exhaust even the most tireless pooches. And if your dog enjoys the company of other dogs, visit a well-run dog park for some positive social interaction with his peers.

Work the Brain

Taxing your dog’s body will help to calm him down, but there’s an equally important body part that needs to be exercised: your dog’s brain.Mental exercise is a phenomenal way to wear out the dog who doesn’t require an all-day commitment or a national park-sized yard. Dogs are athletes, so it’s not always easy to exercise them to the point of exhaustion, but it’s surprisingly easy to work their brains until they’re begging for a break. Something as simple as a shaping game with the clicker (shaping involves breaking down a desired behavior into its incremental parts), which encourages your dog to think creatively and try new things, or teaching him a silly new trick like roll over will require your dog to focus and work through frustration. This isn’t always easy for busy dogs!Games that incorporate nose work, like “find it,” also force a dog to tap into his senses in a new and challenging way. Finally, treat dispensing puzzle games that make your dog work for his food will turn meal times into brain-teaser times.

Instill Manners

A dog who jumps all over you when you try to clip on his leash at walk time, constantly nose bops you for attention, and barks at you when he wants his dinner mightThe core concept in manner’s training is teaching your dog to say “please” by sitting for anything he wants. Before you throw the ball, open the door, clip on the leash, or put down the food bowl, first ask your dog to sit. The moment your dog does it, reward him with what he wants, no extra treat necessary. Your dog will soon understand that “sit” makes good things happen, and with consistency on your part (meaning, you always remember to require the sit before doing something for your dog) he’ll begin to offer the position instead of acting pushy with you.

Reward for Calm Behavior

It’s tempting to tiptoe around when an over-the-top dog finally decides to rest, but it’s important to acknowledge those moments when he’s acting appropriately and taking it easy. Some dogs learn that we only interact with them when they’re engaging in “naughty” behaviors, so they knock over the garbage can and steal laundry in order to get our attention, even if it’sTaking the time to connect positively with your dog when he’s calm, like when he’s resting in his bed or hanging out quietly near you, will encourage him to perform that behavior more often. Remember, behavior that is rewarded will be repeated! Acknowledging your dog’s appropriate behavior with quiet praise and a gentle pat will help him understand that when he settles down he receives positive attention from you. This small change in your daily interactions with your dog can reap surprisingly big rewards.

Consider the Food

It’s tempting to pick up a giant bag of cheap dog food at the local big box store, but what your dog eats can have a direct impact on his behavior.Inexpensive foods are typically loaded with ingredients that your dog doesn’t need, like fillers, byproducts, coloring, and sugar. Much like eating junk food can alter our moods, feeding your dog a low quality diet can impact his behavior.Studies have drawn loose correlations between hyperactivity and certain dog food ingredients, so it makes sense to feed your dog a high quality food with pure, easy to identify ingredients, like identifiable meats (no meat byproducts) and minimal fillers and preservatives.

1. Know your breed

My dog is too active and won’t settle down at night when we watch television,” said one dog owner who called the CGC department. After asking some questions, we learned that the dog was a Border Collie whose owners worked all day. When they came home, the dog was taken for a walk on a leash. We explained that Border Collies can run all day herding sheep and we helped the owner develop a more appropriate exercise plan for this active herding breed. For active breeds, a walk on a leash may not do the trick. Consider fetching and running games in a fenced yard or a dog park where the dog can run. If you are away from home in the daytime for long periods of time, doggie daycare may be a suitable option for your dog.

2. Provide adequate daily exercise

In AKC S.T.A.R. Puppy, STAR is an acronym that stands for Socialization, Training, Activity, and a Responsible owner. Activity means exercise and in STAR classes, instructors talk to dog owners about their daily exercise plans for their puppies. CGC Evaluator Karen Vance described in the book, “AKC STAR Puppy: A Positive Behavioral Approach to Puppy Training”, how she had her students bring an exercise plan for their dogs to class. When Karen looked at the plan for a German Shepherd Dog who was jittery and could not focus, she said a light bulb went off. She worked with the dog owners to modify the exercise plan and within two weeks, the puppy was a different dog.

3. Teach practical skills

Once you’ve met the exercise needs of an active dog, functional Canine Good Citizen skills such as sit, down and stay can be used to manage your dog. When company comes and the dog can’t “settle,” a down-stay is often just what is needed to help the dog become calm.

4. Give the dog a job

In the case of the Border Collie above, increased exercise helped a lot. But active, smart breeds can also benefit from something to do on a regular basis that involves both physical and mental activity. Performance events such as fieldwork, herding, lure coursing, and dock diving are perfect for canine athletes. AKC activities such as obedience, agility, and rally also provide the perfect combo of the physical and mental stimulation needed for the active dog.