Why Is My Dog Hiding Under the Bed?

Does your dog like to squeeze into tight spaces such as the space under your bed? Its a harmless behavior but something that might get you worried since it could be an indication of a bigger problem. Here are some common reasons why dogs like to hide under the bed.

Pay close attention to your dog the next couple of days and try and identify the potential cause of the bedhiding behavior. It could be something beyond your control (e.g. sound of fireworks) or something that you are doing (e.g. running the vacuum cleaner) thats unintentionally scaring the dog.

The space underneath the bed isnt an ideal place for a sick dog to be in because its difficult for you to access. Make the crate a more appealing resting spot by placing your dogs favorite toys and blankets inside. The space underneath the bed isnt easy to access so that can create problems if you find yourself in a major emergency (e.g fire) and you need to leave your house as soon as possible.

You can also box up the space underneath the bed to prevent your dog from entering in the future.

Why is my dog hiding under the bed all of a sudden?

Hiding under beds, tables, or other furniture is a common behavior in many dogs. Dog may hide under things due to fear, illness, or a simple desire for private space. If your dog starts hiding when they never used to before, it may be a sign that something is wrong.

What does it mean when a dog hides?

Dogs hide for many different reasons, the most common being that they want to feel safe. The need for safety could be due to fear, anxiety, depression, or stress. If you notice your dog is scared or anxious, try to determine the source of their fear and remove it.

Why do dogs go under the bed?

Dogs love small spaces because they feel contained, which is enjoyable for relaxation. … Your dog will always want to feel safe and sometimes, underneath the bed is the safest place for them. If there is chaos in your house of any kind, your dog may go under the bed to find peace and safety.

Do dogs hide when they are sick?

It’s important to understand that dogs do not generally exhibit signs of illness when they first start to feel bad. It is believed that they instinctively hide their illness as a form of self-protection (appearing weak would have made them vulnerable in the wild).

Have you ever wondered why your dog spends so much time hiding under the bed or a table? There are several reasons why this common dog behavior might be happening, and some of which are more concerning than others. If your pup insists on scurrying under the bed or a table to hide, there are a few likely explanations.

For many dogs, hiding under a bed or table out of sight can feel like a personal safe space. Thats their fun little fort to relax in, says Jessika Jake, a CATCH Canine Academy certified dog trainer based in San Diego, California.

Unlike a mat or a chair that might often be moved, dogs can depend on certain locations to remain unchanged. After enough repetition, her dog eventually learned to expect a treat whenever he heard loud noises. Your dog may have found a treat or food that fell on the floor and theyre trying to hide it under a bed or table.

According to Jake, her dog once hid under a coworkers desk after finding a normally-forbidden blueberry to eat off of the floor. To get your pup to stop spending so much time hiding under things, one approach is to train them to perform a different behavior.

– 7 reasons why your dog sleeps under the bed (all of a sudden)#1: Just chilling in theden#2: Anxiety#3: Physical injury#4: Illness#5: Your dog is hand-shy#6: Your dog is trying to be close to you#7: Theres a (dog) treasure under the bed#BONUS: Your dog is noise-sensitive

Why you should crate train your dog and how it can stop them from going under the bed. 5 easy tips to stop your dog from sleeping under the bed (make sure to check out #5).

Your dog sleeps under the bed for various reasons such as being scared of certain noises, wanting to be close to you, searching for an alternative of a den, being ill or in pain and wanting to be undisturbed, hiding food scraps or toys under there, being hand-shy and avoiding touch. Your dog could start suddenly sleeping under the bed if theyre in an unfamiliar environment. Other possibilities include a physical injury or an illness.

They feel safe in small enclosed spaces. Things arent always as simple as your dog wanting to relax. Anxious dogs need a hideaway So dont be surprised that when that firework show starts, they end up under the bed faster than a bullet.

Warning: If your dog is anxious and you dont have them treated, the anxiety can worsen. Fact is, dogs are real pros in covering pain. Its good to keep this in mind while considering the possibilities of why your dog hides under the bed.

Vets observed that some dog patients would give the impression theyre relaxed. Its as real as a dogs desire to roll in poop every once in a while so they camouflage their own smell. Hand-shy refers to a dog who doesnt want to be touched.

Comfort, as the space under the bed, serves as an improvised den. But theres more to it than meets the eye The driving force behind this behavior could be clinginess or separation anxiety. Pacing Barking Howling Destructive chewing

As to when youre at home, your dog might not want to leave your sight. Note: A velcro dog might not have separation anxiety. Dogs love hiding their valuables in holes when theyre in nature.

By valuables, I mean scraps of food they didnt feel like eating at the moment. Your dog would stash certain things under the bed because they consider it a safe territory. If your dog has a lot of toys there, theyre likely to want to sleep next to their stuff.

Lissa (my Chihuahua-Mini Spitz mix) loves to sleep in her own bed. Traffic Bangs Gunshots Fireworks Thunderstorms This happens because your dog starts generalizing their fear of specific sounds.

Whats more, research found that dogs who suffer from musculoskeletal pain are prone to have a higher sensitivity to noise. Because as soon as they hear an alarming sound, their muscles will tense. And the dogs will feel more pressure on their inflamed muscles and joints.

Researchers advise that veterinarians run a full physical checkup. Personally, Im not a fan of my dog sleeping under the bed. And whenever my dogs fur brushes against places that are dustier, theres an allergen party in the air!

And my nose starts leaking and my eyes watering. In reason #1 I spoke about how natural it is for a dog to hide in a den. The first thing I advise you to do is to pick a part of the house where youd like your dog to retreat Then place a crate there.

Meaning, your dog should take to it like a duck to water. The good news is that you can do that by putting inside a favorite toy of theirs, Their bowl of water. All of these items will help your dog smell familiar scents.

As soon as you notice your dog sniffing the crate, hand them a treat. This could backfire and it would take you longer to gain their trust again and crate train them properly. Last but not least, you can put a blanket over the crate so it feels more secluded.

This should give your dog the ultimate den feeling. Your dog has suddenly started sleeping under your bed. Or, you could take things into your own hands and speak to your vet.

Reacting on time could be the difference between your dog getting better or worse by the minute A puppy who is fearful of hands could resort under the bed. Eventually, youll teach your puppy to perceive hands as something good.

You can do the same when it comes to loud noises Crate train your dog. If the cause for your dogs hiding is fear, youll need to change something in their environment. It all comes down to what experience the dog has had with the object in question.

Observe your dog: Are they trying to move away from a certain place in your home? Do they cower at the sight of you holding the mop, broom or vacuum cleaner? If so, try a different approach and remove any object that could be stressing out your dog.

Maybe theyre carrying their keys with them all the time and the dog doesnt like the jingling sound. Whether your dog is a foster one or just a fearful soul, theres one thing that can help them. Often, a dog could start suddenly hiding under the bed, if something unexpected has scared them.

As creatures with exceptional hearing, dogs can easily get stressed out by unknown noises. And if the noise is loud for you, imagine what it must be like for your dog Basically, picture it 3 times louder. Theres a method that can help your dog cope with the fear of the unknown.

It works wonders when theyre suddenly put in a new environment. If your dog enjoys the event, they will burst with excitement every time its about to begin. The biological clock alerts them when the time for a walk has come.

Give your dog a favorite activity to do in the meantime. By doing this consistently, youll manage to get an important message to your dog.

1. They Love Private Spaces

For many dogs, hiding under a bed or table out of sight can feel like a personal safe space.“That’s their fun little fort to relax in,” says Jessika Jake, a CATCH Canine Academy certified dog trainer based in San Diego, California. “They like the little den environment.”Jake says her Pomeranian is always searching for new hiding spaces around her home. However, she adds that there’s also a permanence in a bed or table that a dog might find comforting. Unlike a mat or a chair that might often be moved, dogs can depend on certain locations to remain unchanged.

2. They’re Afraid

“If there’s something scary going on, dogs love to find a hiding spot,” says Jake. “A bed or table might be a great spot where they like to go hide.”Anything from a loud car alarm to fireworks might scare your pup. Jake’s dog was fearful of fireworks, so to help ease his worried mind, she gave him treats every time she heard fireworks. After enough repetition, her dog eventually learned to expect a treat whenever he heard loud noises.Jake recommends using a soft voice to help calm your dog when they’re afraid. Next, try removing them from the environment. Ideally, get them somewhere safe and far away from whatever is scaring them.

3. They’re Physically Ill or Injured

“If they’re not feeling so well, they might find a place to hide,” affirms Jake.When Jake’s dog was stung by a bee, he hid behind the toilet as a way to cope. If your dog is hiding and it’s not typical behavior, take a closer look to ensure they’re feeling well. At the first sign of any symptoms of illness or injury, visit your veterinarian to assess the situation.

4. They’re Looking For Food

There’s often an easy explanation for why dogs spend so much time under the kitchen table in particular. That is, they know they might find food there.“If you have a dog that likes to supervise what you’re cooking and eating, they know they’re going to get it. Things like that hold their interest,” says Jake.To keep them from loitering or begging, train them to stay out of the room while you are cooking or eating and reward them with treats for doing so.

5. They’ve Found Something They Shouldn’t Have

Your dog may have found a treat or food that fell on the floor and they’re trying to hide it under a bed or table. Some dogs will eat such foods alone to have it all to themselvesAccording to Jake, her dog once hid under a coworker’s desk after finding a normally-forbidden blueberry to eat off of the floor.

#1: Just chilling in the…den

Sometimes your dog has had enough of the hubbub at home. They want to have some time of their own.And what better place for that than under the bed?Chances are, when your dog is there, no one disturbs them. And they’re loving it!Dogs are den animals after all. They feel safe in small enclosed spaces. It’s an instinctual behavior.

Anxious dogs need a hideaway

Things aren’t always as simple as your dog wanting to relax. In some instances, the reason could be much more serious.Such is the case with dogs who are anxious.Any stressful event such as:

#4: Illness

Your dog could be in pain. And you might not have the slightest idea.But it’s not your fault.Fact is, dogs are real pros in covering pain. It’s how they’re wired.Dogs in the wild would cover their pain. This is a survival mechanism from their side.Otherwise, they could be exposing themselves to danger. It’s because they’ll appear weak to enemies.It’s good to keep this in mind while considering the possibilities of why your dog hides under the bed.Vets observed that some dog patients would give the impression they’re relaxed. Even comfortable, while in reality, they’re in strong pain.So what’s your dog to do if they’re already in pain?Besides hiding it, they’ll try to avoid more pain. And they do it by preventing you from touching where it hurts.In other words, they’ll:

Noise-sensitivity could affect your dog’s life

Noise sensitivity is a thing among dogs.In fact, more than 20% of dogs in the UK suffer from this. The intensity of their fear is from mild to severe.It’s also known as phobia towards certain noises. Usually, these are noises caused by:This happens because your dog starts generalizing their fear of specific sounds.

#3: Work with your dog’s brain

Your dog has suddenly started sleeping under your bed. You can wait for some time and see if they stop.Or, you could take things into your own hands and speak to your vet.It could turn out to be nothing to worry about. Then, you can consider yourself lucky.But what if there’s a health issue?Either way, you can gain your peace of mind by:In short, speaking to a vet is something you won’t regret.

#5: The power of predictability

If so, try a different approach and remove any object that could be stressing out your dog. Then watch if the dog’s behavior changes.In case your dog is anxious around a certain person, look if it’s something the person is doing. Maybe they’re carrying their keys with them all the time and the dog doesn’t like the jingling sound.

BONUS#: Don’t encourage the behavior

Have you been rewarding your dog for hiding under the bed?Maybe you’ve been trying to get them out by giving them treats. Or petting.So your dog could get the idea that in order to receive some rewards, they first have to go under the bed.And what happens if this scenario repeats itself?It could turn into a habit.Avoid trying to get them out by offering treats. Instead, direct their attention to crate training.Besides that, there’s also the danger that you could be encouraging nervous behavior.