Why Is My Dog Breathing Weird?

There are three main types of dog breathing problems that pet owners are likely to deal with, including labored breathing, rapid breathing, and panting. These types of respiratory issues in dogs can be the result of illness, disease or blockage by a foreign object. It’s important to understand each type of breathing problem to know what to do to help your dog.

Disease of the nose, including the small nostrils, can happen due to a tumor, infection, or blockage by a foreign object. Once these objects are consumed and get stuck in their nose, mouth, or windpipe, their airway may become obstructed and they will likely to experience any of these breathing problems.

Paroxysmal respiration, or what is commonly known as a reverse sneeze, can make you think that your dog is having problems breathing, when in fact, they may have just had something irritate their throat or soft palate. You may begin to panic when you hear your dog reverse sneeze for the first time, but remain calm. If your canine is experiencing one or more of these breathing problems, there are a few things that you can try prior to bringing your dog in for medical attention.

If the dog is reverse sneezing, give them room to breathe and offer them water. Even though reverse sneezing in dogs sounds terrible, this problem will usually resolve on its own. Common treatments for dog breathing problems include giving the animal oxygen, pet medication, removing any blockage by a foreign object, or surgery.

In the case of severe breathing problems, your vet may want to give your dog supplemental oxygen. For additional information on these breathing problems causes, symptoms, and remedies, check out PetMD .

Why is my dog suddenly breathing weird?

When dogs are breathing unusually fast, they are said to be suffering from tachypnea. Causes of tachypnea include lower-respiratory issues such as bronchitis or fluid on the lungs and non-respiratory issues such as anaemia, heart disease and bloat.

How can I tell if my dog is having trouble breathing?

Open mouth breathing..Abdomen heaves with every breath..Fast and short breaths (hyperventilating).Breathing is noisy (raspy or congested).Nostrils flare open when breathing..Gum color is grey or blue instead of pink..Tongue is blue or purple instead of pink.

What do you do when your dog is breathing weird?

Sure, some pets breathe noisily all the time, just as some dogs pant a lot. But if you ever see that your pet is breathing abnormally, consider it an emergency and contact your veterinarian immediately — especially if he’s having difficult or labored breathing, a condition called dyspnea.

Youre hanging out with your dog when suddenly, they start making a weird honking sound. It sounds like theyre trying to cough or wheeze. This odd noise understandably may lead you to think that your dog is having trouble breathing, or theyre choking and in grave danger.

This spasm, which lasts around 30 seconds, causes a temporary narrowing of the opening of the trachea, making it difficult for the dog to inhale. Lori Teller, DVM , an associate professor in the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) says: The dog may stand very still with their front legs and neck extended.

These backward sneezing episodes are short-lived and usually resolved by the time you get to the vets office, leaving us veterinarians to (embarrassingly) try to mimic the noise in the exam room. The most common cause of reverse sneezing is an irritation of the soft palate and throat that results in a spasm. The dogs neck will stretch outward and the chest will expand during the spasm as it tries harder to inhale.

Further evaluation by a veterinarian should be pursued if reverse sneezing becomes a frequent occurrence there may be a treatable, underlying cause of the episodes, such as mites or allergies. During an episode, try speaking in a soothing voice while gently massaging your dogs throat, suggests Teller. These dog breeds will occasionally suck the elongated palate into the throat while inhaling, causing reverse sneezing.

Beagles, Yorkies and other small dogs are also particularly prone to this honking cough, possibly because they have smaller throats.

Heavy breathing in dogs and puppies is characterized by rapid, laboured, or struggled breaths. Although this is a normal response if your dog has been playing or is trying to cool down, there are some situations where it can be concerning.

Certain dog breeds like french bulldogs and pugs may breathe heavier due to their shorter snouts. Respiratory conditions, including chronic bronchitis Fluid in lungs or lung cavity Heart failure Cushings syndrome Heatstroke Poisoning from consuming a toxic substance 1 Side effects of medications Injury 2

3 If your dog displays consistently heavy breathing at rest, it may be indicative of a serious health issue. This usually happens in the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of the sleep cycle, and may be accompanied by whimpers or leg movementsall of which are completely normal. Younger dogs are at a higher risk of developing infections and disease that affect the respiratory tract, so if you suspect your puppys breathing is outside of the norm, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

Its normal for dogs to pant or breathe heavily after exercising (walking or running), playing, or if they are in a hot environment where they need to cool down. If your dog is breathing heavy at rest, it can be a red flag for a number of serious health issues. If your dogs gums are pale or turning blue, seek medical attention right away.

If your dog is coughing and breathing heavy, it may be a sign of chronic bronchitis or another serious respiratory issue. Your dog may show other signs of stress such as tucking the tail between the legs and ears that are pinned back rather than being relaxed. If your dog is breathing heavy in addition to showing signs of distress, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

If your dog is having difficulty breathing, they may also make other noises such as snorting, wheezing, or retching. For dogs with respiratory problems, they may require special medications like corticosteroids and/or bronchodilators to help them breathe easier and manage their symptoms.

Respiratory distress can be an emergency. If any animal suddenly develops difficulty breathing, it can be life threatening, and the immediate help of a vet is needed. There are many possible causes, from allergic reactions to heart failure to inhalation of an object of some kind.

There’s a long list of possible causes, and although, in general, if the animal returns rapidly to normal, there’s probably not too much to worry about, you can’t be sure. But with many intermittent problems, it’s impossible for the vet to make a diagnosis by examining the animal when it’s not having a bout of distress.

Common causes include foreign bodies (e.g. an inhaled blade of grass), drainage of secretions from infections, allergies, parasites and anatomical oddities such as an elongated soft palate. When a dog (like the German Shepherd) just has an occasional reverse sneeze, a mild allergy is most likely, and a complex work up is hard to justify.

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Sign up for The Wildest newsletter for updatesYou’re hanging out with your dog when suddenly, they start making a weird honking sound. It sounds like they’re trying to cough or wheeze. This odd noise understandably may lead you to think that your dog is having trouble breathing, or they’re choking and in grave danger.These episodes are often followed by a warp-speed drive to the ER where we (veterinarians) generally assess a happy dog wagging their tail, giving us a look like, “Not sure what all the fuss is about, but boy, that sure was a fun car ride!”That strange honking noise is called reverse sneezing, and it’s usually harmless. It happens to many dogs and rarely requires medical treatment. Still nervous? Keep reading to learn everything you need to know.

What Is Reverse Sneezing?

Also known as inspiratory paroxysmal respiration, reverse sneezing in dogs is caused by a muscle spasm at the back of a dog’s mouth where it meets the throat. This spasm, which lasts around 30 seconds, causes a temporary narrowing of the opening of the trachea, making it difficult for the dog to inhale.Reverse sneezing in dogs is a condition that usually does not need any treatment. It is called reverse sneezing because it sounds a bit like a dog “inhaling sneezes,” “snorting backwards,” “huffing cough,” or “honking cough.” These backward sneezing episodes are short-lived and usually resolved by the time you get to the vet’s office, leaving us veterinarians to (embarrassingly) try to mimic the noise in the exam room.

How To Treat Reverse Sneezing In Dogs

The most common cause of reverse sneezing is an irritation of the soft palate and throat that results in a spasm. The dog’s neck will stretch outward and the chest will expand during the spasm as it tries harder to inhale. The trachea narrows during this time, and it’s hard to get the normal amount of air into the lungs. All of these actions together result in the disturbing display of a reverse sneeze.What are some other causes of reverse sneezing in dogs? Anything that irritates the throat and leads to a spasm, including:Further evaluation by a veterinarian should be pursued if reverse sneezing becomes a frequent occurrence — there may be a treatable, underlying cause of the episodes, such as mites or allergies. In many cases, however, the cause cannot be identified.

Why Is My Dog Breathing Heavy?

Heavy breathing in dogs and puppies is characterized by rapid, laboured, or struggled breaths. Although this is a normal response if your dog has been playing or is trying to cool down, there are some situations where it can be concerning.Fast and heavy breathing may be a sign of another serious health issue, or if severe enough, can be a sign that your dog isn’t getting enough oxygen to their tissues and organs.

Heavy Breathing Vs. Normal Breathing In Dogs

Since dogs can’t sweat, panting helps keep them cool after exercise or when they are in a hot environment. Certain dog breeds like french bulldogs and pugs may breathe heavier due to their shorter snouts.However, there are certain conditions and illnesses that can cause heavy breathing in dogs, such as:

Heavy Breathing In Puppies

In general, puppies have higher respiratory rates and heart rates compared to adult dogs. A normal breathing rate for a puppy is between 15-40 breaths per minute.Puppies tend to breathe more rapidly when sleeping which is likely a response to what they are dreaming about. This usually happens in the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of the sleep cycle, and may be accompanied by whimpers or leg movements—all of which are completely normal.Younger dogs are at a higher risk of developing infections and disease that affect the respiratory tract, so if you suspect your puppy’s breathing is outside of the norm, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

Treatment For Heavy Breathing In Dogs

Treatment for heavy breathing in dogs will vary depending on the underlying cause. Listen to your vet’s advice and administer treatment to your dog as instructed.For dogs with respiratory problems, they may require special medications like corticosteroids and/or bronchodilators to help them breathe easier and manage their symptoms. Your dog may need oxygen therapy to stabilize their condition and ensure they are getting enough oxygen to their organs.The AeroDawg* Chamber is specially designed to administer aerosol bronchodilators or corticosteroids for dogs with chronic bronchitis, allergic rhinitis, collapsed trachea, or other respiratory conditions.