Why Is My Cat Peeing on My Clothes?

Cats are meticulously clean animals, which makes their attraction to dirty laundry seem a little strange. Cats spend countless hours grooming themselves before rolling around in the unwashed, sweaty clothes

Some owners may find that their cat only pees on their husbands or boyfriends clothes and not their own. Cat urine smells strongly of ammonia , and it can be tough to remove the foul odor.

A cat that pees on clothing could be seeking attention from its owner because its jealous of another pet. Once a cat reaches sexual maturity, at 5-6 months old, it could be spraying clothing with urine to attract mates. Also, anxiety, stress, and fear can lead to the sudden loss of bladder control.

You should also ensure that your cat likes its litter box and that its able to access it without experiencing any discomfort. If you have an older cat with limited mobility, it may prefer a tray that has lower sides. The cause of feline urination on clothing needs to be identified and corrected with specific training or medical attention.

Territory marking Problems with the litter box Comfort Sickness, leading to incontinence Attention-seeking Temper this insecurity with a reliable routine and one-on-one attention to reassure your cat that another pet will not replace it. Female cats in heat will do whatever they can to attract a mate, including urinating and spraying constantly.

A cat in heat has strong-smelling urine, so she is sending a message to intact toms in the area. It may start to associate pain with using the litter box if it hurts your cat to pee. Your cat may not make it to the litter box in time, so it thinks that peeing on your clothes is better than soiling the floor.

Wet and dry food A supply of fresh water Cat trees and toys for entertainment A clean litter box Rinse the stain with cold water Dab dry, dont scrub as this drives stains deeper into the fabric Create a vinegar mix 1 part white vinegar, 3 parts water Pour the vinegar mix on the clothing and let it sit for several minutes Cover the affected area with baking soda to mask the scent Wash the clothing in cold water, without detergent Leave the clothing to air dry You will still need to undertake training if theres a behavioral problem, but your cat is less likely to urinate on clothing if it smells unfamiliar.

If your cat is peeing on clothes due to a medical condition, such as a UTI, bladder stones, or hyperthyroidism, this must be treated by a vet. Whether your cat‘s tail is twitching, swishing, straight, or curved, each action and position indicates a different type of emotion.

Why does my cat urinate on my clothes?

The explanation for a cat peeing on clothes will have a medical or behavioral origin. Cats often mark their territory with urine to claim it. Marking behavior is common when a cat shares territory with other cats. A cat that pees on clothing could be seeking attention from its owner because it’s jealous of another pet.

How do you stop a cat from peeing on things?

Always consult your vet for the best methods of reducing stress and anxiety in your cat. Clean any places where your cat has peed inappropriately with an enzymatic cleaner. Your cat will stop marking in those places. Place treats close to where your cats pee inappropriately.

Do cats pee out of spite?

Cats begin urinating outside the box as a response to something that is wrong, either with them or their environment. It is not just them “behaving badly” and cats don’t urinate inappropriately out of “spite”. … Some cats can also have microscopic crystals in their bladders that can cause irritation.

Why do cats pee on certain people's things?

A new person comes into the home, and the kitty urinates on their clothes or side of the bed. This is also often interpreted by humans as spite when it’s really stress and anxiety. The cat is trying to intermingle his scent with the new person’s to feel better about things, not to upset the person or get back at them.

Its a very common complaint you get in from a hard day at work, go to put on your PJs, and theyre covered in urine. Cats often pick the worst places to pee, sometimes even urinating right in front of their shocked owners. But contrary to popular opinion, they dont do this to make a point or because theyre getting back at their owners. There are many reasons why you might find your cat urinating in places other than their tray.

A urine sample usually reveals no bacteria or crystals, and theres not a lot that can help except pain relief and time. Of course, there are other causes of FLUTD, including bacterial cystitis and stones or tumors in the urinary tract, but these are much less common.

Image Credit By: dassel, pixabaySome cats will avoid their tray because they are stressed, but they arent suffering from FIC. If your cat is at the losing end of an argument, this bite is often on the tail or lower back meaning theyre uncomfortable when they pee. These cats have often had a confidence knock, too meaning theyve got a bit of anxiety or fear around urinating and will prefer a quiet spot.

Image Credit By: Maria Sbytova, shutterstock Did you know that 1 in 3 cats will suffer from chronic kidney disease ? You should use a proprietary pet odor removal product they contain enzymes to destroy the molecules that make the area smell. Even if you cant smell it, your cat probably can, and theyll be drawn to the area again so make sure you do a good clean up job!

More Comfortable

Urinary tract infections are most common in senior female cats. It may start to associate pain with using the litter box if it hurts your cat to pee. So, your cat will eliminate elsewhere, such as a soft and warm pile of laundry. Your cat may not like its litter box. Here are the reasons why a cat refuses to use a litter box:A cat that rejects its litter box still needs to eliminate, and indoor cats have limited options. Your cat will look for somewhere comfortable and familiar to pee. The scent of your clothes is ideal.

Need for Attention

If your cat is incontinent, accidents that damage your clothing are inevitable. Your cat may not make it to the litter box in time, so it thinks that peeing on your clothes is better than soiling the floor.As The Veterinary Record explains, some cats are born incontinent, while other cats develop incontinence as they age. Common explanations for a cat becoming incontinent include:

1. FLUTD (Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease)

Cats are very prone to urinary issues – we call thisCats will display classic signs of cystitis – urinating little and often, painful urination, and even blood in the urine. Because it hurts to pee, cats will avoid their tray and pee in other places – my old cat used to use the bath. A urine sample usually reveals no bacteria or crystals, and there’s not a lot that can help except pain relief and time.If your cat is young and has recurrent problems where they won’t urinate in the tray, this is probably the main reason. Of course, there are other causes of FLUTD, including bacterial cystitis and stones or tumors in the urinary tract, but these are much less common.

2. Stress, Fear and Bullying

Some cats will avoid their tray because they are stressed, but they aren’t suffering from FIC. Instead, they develop a fear of using the tray. This is usually the case for cats who are being bullied.If the litter trays are somewhere that the cat finds scary, they’re going to avoid the tray and find a suitable replacement – often a pile of clothes on the floor! This affects cats that live in multi-cat households but are being bullied by one of the other cats, or even cats that are being bullied by a neighborhood cat.The litter tray is often by the cat flap, which may feel unsafe. Putting trays near large windows is also bound to cause problems if there’s a bully cat outside. For these cats, try placing a tray in the area they want to use – if that’s under the dining room table, place a tray there. This is clearly where they feel safe!

3. Marking

Next time your cat pees in front of you, watch what they’re peeing on. If it’s a vertical surface, they’re probably marking, not peeing! It’s a myth that neutering will stop cats from spraying – both males and females can spray even when they’re neutered, although they’re a little less likely to do it.Cats spray to mark their territory, especially if there’s something they’re worried about – like another cat nearby. So, if your cat is spraying, it’s worth working out what’s upsetting them. Is there a neighborhood cat threatening their territory? Perhaps there’s been strange people coming into the house? Is there anything you can do to help your cat feel more confident, like closing the curtains so they can’t see the other cat prowling around the garden?

4. Unclean Tray

Some cats just won’t use a tray that has something in it, even if it’s their own stool or urine. And this can be annoying, as sometimes they’ll wait until the tray is clean before using it, necessitating an immediate re-clean. Having several trays may well solve the problem, and self-cleaning trays can be worth the investment for these cats!

5. Arthritis

Arthritis is very common in older cats, with one study finding signs in 90% of cats over the age of 14. Unfortunately, cats often mask the signs of pain, and this means that owners (and even vets!) aren’t aware that they’re struggling. But sometimes they show subtle signs. Avoiding the litter tray is one of these signs, as cats with arthritis may struggle to get into their tray (especially if their tray is high-sided) or assume the urination position. And to make matters worse, if they find it painful to urinate, they sometimes assume it’s the tray at fault – and start urinating elsewhere.If your cat has started urinating in new places or avoiding the tray and they’re elderly, consider whether arthritis could be a possibility. Try a tray with lower sides, or provide ramps. Your vet can also recommend medication for them.

6. Injury

Just like arthritis, an injury to the legs or back can cause cats to be painful when urinating. The most common injury that can do this is a cat bite and the abscess that almost inevitably follows. If your cat is at the losing end of an argument, this bite is often on the tail or lower back – meaning they’re uncomfortable when they pee. If they associate the pain with the box, they’ll often try weeing elsewhere. These cats have often had a confidence knock, too – meaning they’ve got a bit of anxiety or fear around urinating and will prefer a quiet spot. Veterinary treatment is usually needed for the bite, too.

7. Kidney Disease

Did you know that 1 in 3 cats will suffer from chronic kidney disease? The failing kidneys can’t recoup water from the urine before it leaves the body, meaning that cats urinate more often, and a bigger volume. They drink more to compensate, but that inevitably leaves the body, too. These cats can saturate their tray quite quickly and may choose to urinate elsewhere. They may also be ‘caught short’ and not be able to make it to the tray. Cats with renal disease need veterinary care and support.