Why Is My Cat Moving Her Kittens?

It can be exciting knowing that your cat is having a litter of cute kittens. But after theyre born, theres so much to keep an eye on as a cat owner. Some mother cats can start moving their kittens away from the nest area, and this can happen for a variety of reasons. There are a few methods that you can use to stop your mother cat from moving her kittens, though!

Image Credit: Christiane Hfer, PixabayWhile it can be incredibly exciting to have newborn kittens in the house, resist the urge to pick them up and cuddle them. Your mother cat should be doing a great job of looking after her kittens, and as long as she has a clean nest and access to food, water, and her litter tray, she needs minimal supervision.

As the kittens start moving around and exploring on their own, the mother cat will become more relaxed and accepting of people visiting her babies. Image Credit: JackieLou DL, PixabayAs soon as you know that your cat is expecting kittens, start thinking about potential locations for her nest. Image Credit: Ermolaev Alexander, ShutterstockSometimes a mother cat will move a single kitten if she thinks that they may be ill.

Uterine metritis is an infection that leads to fever, lethargy, decreased milk production, and a bad-smelling discharge from your cats uterus. Image Credit: New Africa, ShutterstockNewborn kittens cant regulate their own body temperature, so they need help keeping warm for the first few weeks of life. As part of your daily check, remove any soiled blankets, clean the litter box thoroughly, and make sure spilled food is cleared away.

How do I stop my cat from moving her kittens?

Keep the area clean and as odor-free as possible..Ensure the area is dim, quiet, and relaxing..Keep other pets away from the area..Give the new family plenty of privacy..Monitor Mom and her kittens from a distance, when possible.

Why does my cat keep wanting to move her kittens?

Cats will instinctively want to keep their kittens somewhere clean. That’s because strong scents can attract predators in the wild, and that will put the lives of her kittens in danger. If the nest is becoming dirty, then she might start trying to move her kittens to a cleaner spot.

Should I let my cat move her kittens?

Moving Kittens is Normal Cat Behavior. House cats and stray or feral cats are similar in that they prefer to find a secure, safe place to have their kittens. A cat will spend some time scoping out places to give birth, and sometimes the spot she ends up in is not her first choice.

Your furry friend had a litter of little kittens snuggling in a box you set up in the spare bedroom. You come home from work to find they’re gone. You hear your new mom mewing to her babies and find them in a bundle under your bed. Why‘d she relocate?

Always check with your veterinarian before changing your pets diet, medication, or physical activity routines.

Youre excited about your cat having her kittens, and when the day arrives, you cant help but keep checking on her to see if she is alright and to see the new kittens. But once they are born, you notice that your cat keeps moving one of her kittens despite your efforts of moving it back again. What is going on here?

A mama cat needs peace to take care of her babies, so she might be moving her kittens to a new area to get that quiet she desperately needs. Its more beneficial to your cat and her kittens to leave them alone besides giving her clean water and fresh food.

The first 24 hours after she gives birth is crucial for your cat as she will make the final decision of who to save and who to reject. In the wild, cats will move their kittens to a hidden and secure location to keep them safe from predators. Mama cats also move their kittens to a new nest within three days to throw predators off their scent.

A recent delivery tells predators that the mother is vulnerable and her babies will be easy to pick off. Mother aggression happens in many species, including cats and humans, so to avoid conflict, she moves them. Sometimes, mother cats can be disoriented or confused after giving birth and will move one of her kittens back and forth for a while.

The only thing you can do is follow your cat closely and keep the kitten warm and cared for while disoriented. Once the mother cat leaves the area, take a blanket and put it under the kitten to keep it warm.

4. Make sure the nest is warm

Newborn kittens can’t regulate their own body temperature, so they need help keeping warm for the first few weeks of life. If there are drafts where your mother cat has made her nest, then she may decide to move it to a warmer place. Check that doors and windows are kept shut. You might even consider adding a thermometer to the room so you can keep an eye on the temperature.

5. Keep the nest clean

Cats will instinctively want to keep their kittens somewhere clean. That’s because strong scents can attract predators in the wild, and that will put the lives of her kittens in danger. If the nest is becoming dirty, then she might start trying to move her kittens to a cleaner spot.As part of your daily check, remove any soiled blankets, clean the litter box thoroughly, and make sure spilled food is cleared away. If the nest and surrounding area are as clean as possible, the mother cat will be more likely to stay in the same spot.

Do Not Disturb

You were so enamored with the adorable balls of kitten you just couldn’t stop visiting them. You would pet them and gingerly hold them, squealing with delight and their precious little faces. While you think you’re just being friendly, mom may not see it this way. If she feels like her babies are being disturbed or in danger, she’ll move them to a quieter location. It’s OK to visit the new mom, just keep your voice down and respect her space. If Kitty seems to be enjoying the attention, she may trust you enough to allow you to visit her nest. If she starts to seem upset, back away and give her some room.

Outgrown the Nest

While mom may move her babies because the spot you picked was too noisy, it’s probably just because the babies are getting bigger. Most mother cats will move their babies around 3 or 4 weeks old. This could be because they’ve gotten too big for the basket you supplied her to give birth in. It may have simply gotten a little messy so it’s time for a cleaner space. In the wild, when the kittens begin to wean she’ll move them closer to her favorite hunting grounds so she can teach them to hunt. This may mean she’ll move them closer to her food dish so she can easily teach them to eat solid food.

Still in Labor

If Kitty has just given birth to three or four babies and she’s still yowling and crying, she may be still be in labor. Cats have three stages of labor. During the first stage the kittens are moving around and getting into position to enter the world. She’ll move around a lot trying to get comfortable and start preparing a nest. This stage can last 12 to 24 hours. During the second stage, she’ll be actively giving birth to a kitten. During this stage she’ll probably meow frequently because, as any mom will tell you, giving birth hurts. It’ll take about 15 minutes for the kitten to be born once you see his little paws emerge. If it takes longer than this, you should bring mom to the vet for help. The third stage of labor is a period of rest between kittens. This can be a few minutes to up to an hour. You may think she’s done giving birth since she’ll take the time to relax and groom her babies. If she begins crying again and straining, it just means more little kittens are on their way.

The Kitten Might Be Sick or Injured

Sometimes, a mother cat will move a sick or injured cat away from the rest of the litter because she cannot care for it properly and leave it to die, which is nature’s way of dealing with things. Many kittens born will not survive past twelve weeks, and if your cat suspects one won’t survive, she might be trying to save the rest of her litter.If you keep moving it back, she will move it again and again, but if you want to save the kitten, you might want to separate it from the mama and begin caring for it yourself. To care for a kitten properly, you will need milk made, especially for kittens, and a proper feeding setup. Contact your vet to ensure you’re caring for the kitten correctly.Cats can often sense illness sooner than humans can, and if you think your cat is rejecting one of its kittens, it might be because there is something wrong with it. Before you start caring for her kitten, please take it to the vet to rule out any illness.

She Might Be Confused and Disoriented

Sometimes, mother cats can be disoriented or confused after giving birth and will move one of her kittens back and forth for a while. Labor and delivery are physically and mentally taxing on most mammals, including cats. A mother cat might have difficulty grasping the situation and will keep moving one of her kittens.The only thing you can do is follow your cat closely and keep the kitten warm and cared for while disoriented.

Conclusion

There isn’t an effective way to stop your cat from moving her kittens aside from caring for them once she moves them. But you can save the kitten if you think your cat abandoned it. Here’s how you do that: