Why Is My Cat Limping All of a Sudden?

Cats are resilient creatures. Although not immortal, they are agile, can withstand high falls and will defend themselves if necessary. Such resilience means they are also able to endure a lot of pain without manifesting obvious symptoms. While this is a credit to the cat‘s strength, it makes it difficult for their guardians to see problems when they arise. This means if you are asking yourself why is my cat limping all of a sudden?, you should exercise some concern.

For example, some species of roundworm such as the Dracunculus insignis are mainly found in the connective tissue in the skin of their host’s legs [1] . Since cats are naturally inclined to spend time up high, falling from a great height can lead to a fracture of the bone or a snapped tendon.

They may have dilated pupils, visible hemorrhages (bleeding) , breathing difficulties or other expected symptoms of a serious injury. Whether or not the cat has more symptoms, the sudden presence of a limp will require a veterinary visit. It is possible a fracture occurs and the broken bone is unable to heal because the cat is walking on the limb.

Taking the cat‘s temperature can help us to determine if infection is present, but a vet will need to diagnose the problem . All with all viral diseases, the treatment will be based on making the symptoms subside so the body can fight off infection.

Why would a cat suddenly start limping?

There are many reasons that your cat might suddenly start limping. A paw injury– such as a torn pad, embedded object, or broken claw could cause limping. A major injury such as tendonitis, a sprain, a dislocated joint, or a broken leg can cause limping.

Should I go to the vet if my cat is limping?

Contact your vet if your cat has a mild limp (that doesn’t improve within 24 hours), is slowing down with old age or seems a bit stuff when they move around. Contact your vet immediately for an emergency appointment if your cat develops a sudden limp, can’t put weight on a leg or is in severe pain.

Why is my cat limping but not crying?

Even if your cat is not crying, don’t assume that it’s not masking its discomfort. In fact, some cats become accustomed to pain and no longer react. Common reasons for a cat to limp include trauma, arthritis (joint pain), and infection. Some senior cats overexert themselves while exercising, causing temporary lameness.

How long does it take for a cat limp to go away?

Traumatic Injury and Joint Replacement. Typically, full recovery from a complex fracture repair or hip replacement surgery can take up to two or three months, and some cats need six months of careful monitoring and rehabilitation before they are completely recovered.

Is your cat limping and you don’t know why? It could be her paw, a muscle, or a joint that’s bothering her but she won’t be able to meow the exact location of what’s ailing her. Cats may limp for a variety of reasons. So, it’s important to understand what to look for and learn how to help alleviate her distress.

An older cat who walks stiffly, no longer jumps onto or off of the couch, or suddenly becomes reclusive may be suffering from joint pain. The Atlantic Veterinary Hospital writes that kitty ACL tears usually result from jumping or falling from high places, and are more common in overweight cats.

Whether your cat is limping due to something minor or major, it is still important to spend quality time with her and try to keep your kitty calm and relaxed.

Pets have a special place in our lives, which is why it can be so frightening when one of them gets hurt. Worse yet, they cant tell us whats wrong. If you see your cat limping, a thousand questions might race through your brain. The most burning question of all, though, is why.

The treatment is similar for a cut or torn paw pad or broken claw. Your cat may have sprained or broken their leg, or there could be another chronic condition such as arthritis causing them pain.

A broken claw Thorns, cactus needles, broken glass, or other foreign objects in the paw Fighting with another cat or wildlife An injured or cut paw pad A foreign object stuck between the toes or in the paw pad Tendonitis A sprained leg A dislocated joint A broken leg Arthritis Hip dysplasia Patellar luxation Lumbosacral disease Intervertebral disk disease Tumors, either benign or cancerous Cancers such as lung-digit syndrome, injection site sarcoma, or lymphoma A paw injurysuch as a torn pad, embedded object, or broken claw could cause limping. A major injury such as tendonitis, a sprain, a dislocated joint, or a broken leg can cause limping.

If your cat is limping but will allow you to touch and inspect the leg, check for any signs of injury starting with the paw and moving up. If there is a small foreign object lodged in the pad or between the toes, such as a thorn or piece of broken glass, pull it out and clean the wound. A hairline fracture may exhibit many of the same symptoms as a sprained leg, but it calls for different treatment.

A broken leg is a serious injury, but with the right medical attention, your cat will be able to get back to their regular activities within roughly three to four months . Whenever closing a door, cupboard, recliner, or other open areas, check to make sure your cat isnt traveling through. Sprains are, generally, much less serious than a broken bone, but they are still major injuries and take time to heal.

To help with your cats recovery, keep them quiet and confined to a small area to avoid aggravating the injury.

But the cause of your cats lameness could be difficult to nail down if its a torn ligament, soft tissue injury, or due to nerve damage. Infections like abscesses may appear as swellings under the skin and on the paw pads.

Diabetes, nerve damage, and progressive polyarthritis (immune system disorder) can all lead to limping. Stiffness Swelling or inflammation Lumps and bumps Bleeding Refuses to bear weight on an affected limb Refuses to be touched or held Less physical activity Lesser amount of jumping or running Lessened or lack of appetite Obvious limp Lethargy Signs of trauma Avoiding stairs Loss of muscle mass Panic when touched Aggression Unable to walk or stand Loss of muscle mass around the affected limb

Your cat has a higher likelihood of becoming more injured in the great outdoors, so keep them indoors until you see a veterinarian. Do not put the bandage on too tight, as this can cause circulation to be cut off to the leg and lead to further damage. If you find foreign bodies between the toes, clean the wound carefully without harming your cat.

Only use warm, running water to clean, not hydrogen peroxide or rubbing alcohol. Limping is paired with fever, difficulty breathing, or pain when touched. They will talk to you about any behavioral changes youve seen, so write down your cats symptoms as you see them before the appointment.

They may find obvious causes of trauma, like foreign bodies embedded in the paw pad. If an x-ray does not give the answer, they may have to resort to more complicated tests, such asCT scans, MRIs, or ultrasounds. In the case of a broken bone, dislocation, or severe wound, your cat may need surgery.

They may recommend physical therapy to help maintain muscle strength in the case of arthritis. Another treatment plan may include recommending that your cat lose weight so theres less pressure on their joints. Vets could suggest a change in diet, which may include switching to a food that supports joint health.

Gently support the cats hips and shoulders as you lift them into the carrier so they dont further hurt themselves, or you. Cats will often hide pain because its a sign of weakness and they want to appear strong to potential predators. Generally speaking, if your cat is hiding, not eating their normal amount, crying out more, or not doing the things they typically like to do, it could be a sign they are in pain.

My cat is limping but not crying

To find out why our cat is limping, we need to take a look at the affected limb. By looking at how they place their leg on the ground, we can get a better idea of where the injury or wound is located. We should never assume the nature of the injury, but we also need to be careful when examining the limb. If we manipulate it too much, we might exacerbate the injury. This is why it is so important to first observe how they walk.Through observation, we can see if the cat is limping on their front leg or limping on their back leg. We can also see how they put pressure on the ground. If the cat is trying not to touch their paw to the floor, it is possible there is an injury to theirAs we state above, cats are known for their durability. This means it is not uncommon for a cat to be limping, but not make any sound to alert us to their pain. They may have cried out when the injury happened, but we won’t necessarily have been present. Even if we touch the affected area, they may still not make a noise. Hopefully this is a good sign that the injury is not serious. However, it can become worse by not healing properly or even leading to infection.If your cat is limping on their front paw, carefully examine their paw pad. Look at the skin for signs of wounds and don’t forget to look between their toes. While cats are generallyWith mild or superficial wounds on your cat‘s paw or leg, we can treat them at home. This will require removal of any foreign body and disinfecting the wound. If their lameness or limping still persists, you will need to take them to the vet.

My cat is only limping sometimes

It is possible you notice your cat is limping all of sudden, then just as suddenly, seems to be fine. If the limping comes and goes, then we might worry it is aPart of the problem is that arthritis is progressive, so the cat may only be limping for some periods of time and not at others. As the disease progresses, the limping will be more permanent and their limbs will never quite recover.Treatment of these types of degenerative diseases are usually managing the symptoms. The reason for this is because it is not curable. Medicine to treat the pain and reduce inflammation may be required. Food supplements or dietary changes may be recommended to help strengthen their joints. Modifying their environment to make daily tasks easier will likely be required. A full treatment plan will be discussed after veterinary diagnosis.

Common Causes of Limping

Sometimes, your cat may be limping from a simple accident. She may have gotten something stuck in her paw pad, or she may even have a slight muscle strain. Wait until your cat is calm and lying down. Then, try to inspect her leg and paw. Look for noticeable swelling, redness or signs of pain like meowing or flinching when you lightly touch the area. Wag! points out that a cat with a paw pad injury, such as an ingrown claw, may also lick one paw excessively or avoid walking on that foot. Even if you don’t see any swollen paws, and she seems to be doing most of her usual activities, a little limp may warrant calling your veterinarian to prevent an infection setting in.One danger for cats that can sometimes cause leg injuries is “high rise syndrome,” says the Animal Medical Center of New York. A curious cat can easily jump out of an open window and fall. Make sure your windows have strong screens and never leave them open when you’re not at home. Even a jump from a high bookshelf can injure an elderly (or a very small) cat, so be aware of how much access she has to high perches.Arthritis is another issue that can cause cat limping. An older cat who walks stiffly, no longer jumps onto or off of the couch, or suddenly becomes reclusive may be suffering from joint pain. Your vet may recommend changing her food to one that supports joint health or fixing her a new napping corner in a warm, low-to-the-ground spot.If things do not improve within twenty-four hours, it is best to have the limp looked at by a vet to avoid any long-term damage. Cats are great at hiding their pain, so if she is showing signs, it is likely severe enough that your vet should take a look. Your vet may also take an X-ray to determine the cause of your cat‘s leg injury.

When to Be Concerned

If your cat is in pain, the process of coaxing her into her cat carrier for a trip to the vet may be more difficult than usual. Here are a few things to keep in mind to make the trip less stressful for you and your fur baby:

People Also Ask:

Once you’ve identified the source of your cat’s limping, you may be left with other questions. How long will it take them to recover? What can I do to prevent them from being injured in the future? Rest assured–we’ve got you covered.

Why is my cat suddenly limping?

There are many reasons that your cat might suddenly start limping. A paw injury–such as a torn pad, embedded object, or broken claw could cause limping. A major injury such as tendonitis, a sprain, a dislocated joint, or a broken leg can cause limping. Limping can also be caused by certain chronic conditions, such as arthritis, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, lumbosacral disease, intervertebral disk disease, or cancer.

Why is my cat limping?

Watching your four-legged friend limp can be scary as a pet parent. Lameness can be caused by an injury, like a broken bone or a joint dislocation.But the cause of your cat’s lameness could be difficult to nail down if it’s a torn ligament, soft tissue injury, or due to nerve damage. Infections like abscesses may appear as swellings under the skin and on the paw pads.

First aid for cat limping in non-emergencies

Most of the time, you’ll need to see a veterinarian to figure out why your cat is limping. But before your appointment, you can check for cuts, broken nails, and bleeding. You need to keep your cat indoors.You shouldn’t let your cat go outside if they are limping. Your cat has a higher likelihood of becoming more injured in the great outdoors, so keep them indoors until you see a veterinarian.If your cat is bleeding, apply pressure and wrap their leg/foot in a bandage. Do not put the bandage on too tight, as this can cause circulation to be cut off to the leg and lead to further damage. It is always best to check with your vet first and only put a bandage on if you can get to your vet within 24 hours. If you find foreign bodies between the toes, clean the wound carefully without harming your cat. Only use warm, running water to clean, not hydrogen peroxide or rubbing alcohol.

How veterinarians diagnose lameness in cats

Call your vet immediately if your cat is limping and:

How vets treat lameness in cats

How your cat’s lameness is treated really depends on the diagnosis. Vets can help manage the pain they are feeling by prescribing your cat a pain medication while you are waiting for answers, though.The first step is to create a treatment plan to relieve your cat’s pain. Vets may administer pain medication, antibiotics, or anti-inflammatory medication. Your cat may receive oral medication or injections. In the case of a broken bone, dislocation, or severe wound, your cat may need surgery.Your vet will likely prescribe cage rest, so the cat doesn’t harm their injury further or put pressure on an injury. They may recommend physical therapy to help maintain muscle strength in the case of arthritis. Another treatment plan may include recommending that your cat lose weight so there’s less pressure on their joints. Vets could suggest a change in diet, which may include switching to a food that supports joint health.

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