Why Is My Cat Hiding Suddenly?

Any pet parent with a feline friend will know hiding is considered normal behavior. Cats hide so they can snooze quietly and comfortably, away from noisy humans and grubby hands. Hiding is also instinctual behavior that helps cats to avoid potential predators and pounce on unexpected prey.

Felines are hyper-sensitive critters, and even a change like getting a new sofa or installing a new air conditioner could cause a cat to hide and avoid a certain room. Speaking to PetMD , Myrna Milani, DVM, states that, “The worst thing you can tell the new person to do is play nice and ‘kissy face’ with the cat.”

Instead, you should encourage a new person to sit near one of your cat‘s hiding spots, so your tiny tiger can come out and greet the visitor when they’re ready. It’s also a good idea to set up their furniture, like their cat tree and bedding, somewhere comfortable, as this will help them feel normal. When you bring a new person or animal into your home, ensure you give your cat plenty of space and allow them to get used to new scents so they don’t become fearful of the latest addition to your household.

Do cats hide when they are dying?

Cats are known to hide when they are gravely ill. Why? Because they instinctively know that in the wild, a sick animal is a target. They are likely trying to protect themselves by “hiding” from any threat that might take advantage of them in their compromised state.

Do cats hide when they are sick?

Sick cats usually become withdrawn and may hide, although this does depend on the personality of the individual cat. Some cats become more clingy or demanding of attention, while others just become cranky.

What does it mean when a cat isolates itself?

It is simply a leftover instinct of self-preservation. The cat feels vulnerable and compromised, and so isolation provides a sense of safety. … With this, their instinct to isolate tells them to hide in a cool dark place. The cat is vulnerable, and they are simply protecting themselves.

What are symptoms of a cat dying?

Extreme Weight Loss. Weight loss is very common in senior cats. ….Extra Hiding. Hiding is the telltale sign of illness in cats, but can be hard to define. ….Not Eating. ….Not Drinking. ….Decreased Mobility. ….Behavioral Changes. ….Poor Response to Treatments. ….Poor Temperature Regulation.

There are lots of reasons why a cat might hide. Cats hide to feel safe, and in order to protect themselves from things they perceive as dangerous or stressful so it’s important to find out the reasons why your cat is hiding.

However, if your cat is hiding for prolonged periods of time this could be an indication that they are distressed about something more permanent in the environment. Providing a selection of possible options, such as some open cupboard doors, areas under beds, cardboard boxes and gaps behind sofas will give your cat a choice of places to go when they feel scared.

Cats love having small spaces to hide and get away from it all, as it helps them to feel calm and secure.

Wheres the strangest place youve ever found your cat hiding? From the smallest nook in a closet to the most unlikely places of comfort (like, inside the refrigeratortrue story!), cats are masters of concealment. Usually, cats hide simply because theyve found a safe, warm, and comfortable place to snooze away the day. But if you have a cat for whom hiding is not a normal behavior, who suddenly starts hiding and does not want to come out, it could be an indicator that something is wrong.

As Myrna Milani, DVM, an author and veterinary scholar in the fields of pathology and anthrozoology, points out to PetMD , If your cat usually spends its day hidden, thats generally fine and normal. If your kitty is hiding pretty much all of the time, and you have ruled out a medical issue, think about things in your home environment that may have changed and could be making her uncomfortable or, even sadsuch as the loss of a partner in a bonded pair.

Forcing things can damage trust between you whereas respect for the feline independent streak, patience, treats, and lots of love can only strengthen your bond.

Cats are not always the most social of creatures. While dogs usually seem to enjoy being around their humans 24/7, cats like to get away from it all and hunker down in a quite place where no one can find them.

According to Blake, Cats that are anxious or fearful will hide to make themselves feel more secure and avoid whatever in the environment is causing them to be afraid. You can do slow introductions through a door or baby gate and pair it with things the cat finds wonderful, such as treats or petting or brushing.

Its often in a dark, cozy place, like under the bed, or in the back of a closet where a fallen coat can provide comfort and warmth.

Introduction

Any pet parent with a feline friend will know hiding is considered normal behavior. Cats hide so they can snooze quietly and comfortably, away from noisy humans and grubby hands. Hiding is also instinctual behavior that helps cats to avoid potential predators and pounce on unexpected prey.Whether it’s in a closet, under the stairs, or behind the sofa, cats will find somewhere to get some peace and quiet. While occasional hiding is considered normal, you might be alarmed if your cat starts to disappear for most of the day. If your cat suddenly starts hiding far more than usual, it could signify that something’s amiss.

The Root of the Behavior

There are several reasons that your little lion might be hiding more than usual. One of the most common reasons is due to anxiety resulting from environmental and social changes. For example, moving to a new house is a common reason for cats to hide, as it’s a big, new environment where your cat doesn’t feel safe yet.If your cat is usually social and playful but suddenly becomes withdrawn, it could be a sign of sickness, ranging from the flu to a chronic illness. If your cat is hiding suddenly and excessively, take them to a vet for a medical examination.At the same time, environmental changes don’t need to be as grand as moving house. Felines are hyper-sensitive critters, and even a change like getting a new sofa or installing a new air conditioner could cause a cat to hide and avoid a certain room.As solitary creatures, cats would prefer to avoid conflict than face something head-on. So, if a person or another animal has changed the social structure in your house, this could stress out your cat. New faces around the household will frighten a cat, and they’ll likely avoid the person or animal until they know they’re not a threat.If hiding due to social changes is prolonged, it could be about how a person or animal is interacting with your cat. If a person is over-enthusiastic when interacting with your cat, this could cause your cat stress. Bringing another pet into the house could also change the social hierarchy, which may distress your cat and cause them to hide.Cats who suddenly start hiding without any changes to their environment or social structure may have a medical issue. As solitary animals with strong instincts, cats hide sickness very well.

Encouraging the Behavior

While you shouldn’t encourage your cat to hide, you can provide safe spaces for them to go when they’re stressed, which should reduce their stress and excessive hiding.Set up a few dark and comfortable corners behind furniture or in closets where your cat can escape the household hustle and bustle. Battersea Dog and Cat Home also suggests making a hideaway for your cat.Trying to stop your cat from hiding excessively? There are a few things you can do that should help your cat adjust to change. Allowing your cat to get used to strangers is a great way to avoid social stress.When a new person comes to your home, don’t encourage them to invade your cat‘s personal space. Speaking to PetMD, Myrna Milani, DVM, states that, “The worst thing you can tell the new person to do is play nice and ‘kissy face’ with the cat.”Instead, you should encourage a new person to sit near one of your cat‘s hiding spots, so your tiny tiger can come out and greet the visitor when they’re ready. A treat or toy is also a good way of encouraging your cat to meet someone new.If you have a new permanent resident in the house, get your cat used to their scent. An excellent way to do this is to leave a towel or piece of unwashed clothing on the floor, so your cat can get used to their scent. However, if a cat pees on a piece of clothing or towel, it’s a sign they need more time to adjust.If you’re moving a cat into a new environment, normalize the process as much as possible. Avoid continuously moving furniture, as this will increase your cat‘s stress levels. It’s also a good idea to set up their furniture, like their cat tree and bedding, somewhere comfortable, as this will help them feel normal. Settling in quickly is the key to a successful move.

Other Solutions and Considerations

If you’re unsure about the cause of your cat suddenly hiding, take them to the vet just to be safe. Hiding is one of the first signs that your cat is suffering from illness.There are a few other reasons your cat might be hiding. If you have a female feline that goes outdoors and isn’t neutered, there’s a good chance they might be pregnant. It’s not always obvious that a cat is pregnant until suddenly several adorable furballs are brought into the world.Usually, a cat will hide for a few days before they’re about to give birth so that they can get comfortable and ready for labor. If you think your cat might be pregnant, feel their belly, and you should be able to feel the outline of a kitten or two.

Why is my cat hiding?

There are lots of reasons why a cat might hide. Cats hide to feel safe, and in order to protect themselves from things they perceive as dangerous or stressful so it’s important to find out the reasons why your cat is hiding.Cats as a species are self-reliant, so when faced with a difficult situation your cat would naturally prefer to avoid it rather than charge in and fight.Your cat will hide when there is something, or someone, nearby that is causing them concern. They may be frightened or just wary about something unfamiliar and might want to keep out of the way, just in case. If you leave them to it you will usually find that they will come out of hiding once the threat has gone or they have realised that whatever it was they were frightened of isn’t actually scary at all.However, if your cat is hiding for prolonged periods of time this could be an indication that they are distressed about something more permanent in the environment. This could be anything but is often other cats in the home or even a person who is over-enthusiastic in the way they interact with them. Take a look at our advice on stress relief for cats for more information to help you identify potential sources of stress for your cat.The other significant reason why a cat might hide comes from their instinct to be self-reliant. An injured or unwell cat will often withdraw and find a safe and enclosed space where they can remain until they feel better, so if your cat continues to hide, you should make an appointment with your vet to rule out or diagnose any medical issues.

Where might my cat be hiding?

For a cat to choose a hiding place it must feel both private and secure. Some cats will choose an elevated position to hide, such as on top of a wardrobe. This has the added benefit that they can still observe what is going on without being seen. Other cats prefer to retreat to a ground level hiding place, somewhere as far away as possible from any activity, or other cats, usually in a dark, enclosed space.Often not being able to see the threat is enough to reassure your cat, so you may see your cat thinking they can’t be seen when they simply have their head under a towel. You might see this behaviour when you take them to the vet, for example!Your cat might also use their hiding places as sleeping or resting areas when they are relaxed and not feeling in any danger. It’s a good idea to follow some basic ‘cat etiquette’ and not to disturb your cat while they are using one of their hiding places (unless it is essential to do so) and to avoid disrupting or cleaning the areas too frequently.

Why Would a Cat Suddenly Start Hiding?

A cat who has never hidden before may start doing so just because she wants to but it could also be a sign that something is amiss. If you have just added a fluffy rug under your bed and she suddenly begins spending time there but is still interacting with you/your household, it’s likely just because she thinks that rug is as nice as you do.If something in your household has changed–from adding new furniture to new people–your cat may hide until she has had time to get used to the new additions. In some cases, cats may not be open to such change–an example that is somewhat common, but maybe not common sense to us humans, is the installation of something like a ceiling fan in a room. The motion and whirring could cause a cat to hide from the interloper for a while and then decide 1) it is manageable or 2) never to enter that room again.Other common reasons cats suddenly start hiding is that they are not feeling well, are stressed, or scared. As Myrna Milani, DVM, an author and veterinary scholar in the fields of pathology and anthrozoology, points out to PetMD, “If your cat usually spends its day hidden, that’s generally fine and normal. The problem arises, however, when social cats suddenly start hiding. This behavior is often indicative of stress, fear, a medical issue, or some combination of these.”

Do Cats Hide When They Are Sick?

It is very common for cats to hide when they are sick. While humans tend to want some TLC when we’re sick, cats are the opposite. “Although cats are predators, in nature larger predators will prey upon them. Since sick or old animals make an easy target, any obvious sign of illness will alert other predators that the animal is ill. Therefore, cats have evolved to hide signs of illness and pain,” note the experts at VCA animal hospitals.This makes it easy to understand why it is hard to tell if a cat is sick. Common indicators that your cat isn’t feeling well include lethargy, loss of appetite, and hiding. If your kitty tucks in somewhere, is sleeping more than usual, not eating, and refuses to come out, you’ll want to get her to the vet to find out what is going on.