Why Is My Cat Drooling and Not Eating?

Sometimes its difficult to tell if what your kitty is doing is normal cat behavior. For instance, you may wonder if your cats drooling is normal or something to be concerned about. Here are some reasons why cats drool and some signs to look for so you know when your cats drooling requires a vet visit.

If this happens, you should call your vet to talk about your cats sudden drooling. Your veterinarian can perform an oral exam to evaluate your cat for the presence of dental disease.

Your veterinarian will perform a full exam and treat your cat according to the clinical signs present. Gastrointestinal (GI) foreign body blockage is one cause of nausea in cats, which can lead to drooling. Vets sometimes will find a string or ribbon stuck under the cats tongue, which often extends down further into the cats GI tract (stomach, small intestine).

If there is concern that your cat may have a gastric (stomach) or small intestinal foreign body thats not associated with a string/ribbon, your veterinarian will recommend imaging such as x-rays and/or abdominal ultrasound. These disease conditions are diagnosed by testing your cats blood and urine. If your cat has inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or cancer (neoplasia), this can cause physical changes in their stomach and intestine due to thickening of the stomach/intestinal walls, which can cause nausea and drooling.

If your veterinarian suspects either of these disease processes, they may recommend abdominal ultrasound, endoscopy, or biopsy of the affected tissue. If a cat has a cancerous mass involving the tongue or back of the throat, they may: Those that chew on electrical cords (most commonly seen in kittens) need pain control and possibly other supportive care, including a soft diet.

Try offering water or a treat after medicating your cat to help wash the bad taste out of their mouth. Cats may drool if they have a neurological disease that interferes with their ability to move food around their mouth and swallow. If a cat has problems with the nerves in their head (cranial nerves), you would see more localized signs (affecting their face only) versus a health condition that affects their whole body, which could cause signs in multiple areas.

Your veterinarian will perform an exam to identify the problem and can then set up a plan for diagnostics and treatment. They may associate the owners affection with the contentment they felt as kittens nursing on their mothers. This can be normal behavior, and your cat may also purr, knead their paws, and/or rub their face/body on you or your furniture.

Why would a cat suddenly start drooling?

Normal drooling is usually accompanied by excitement or pleasure in the cat. Abnormal drooling appears suddenly, and can last for hours. A cat who has overheated may begin to hypersalivate. Certain diseases, injuries, and viruses can also cause a cat to drool excessively.

When should I worry about my cat drooling?

If your cat is drooling excessively it is a good time to have her examined by your veterinarian. Some of these causes can be very serious, and early detection is always best. … As many as 85% of cats over 3 years of age have tooth or gum disease. The saliva that results may be blood tinged or smell unpleasant.

Why is my cat lethargic and drooling?

The most common cause of hypersalivation in cats is dental disease, which occurs in 85% of cats over the age of 3. … However, if you notice your cat drooling too much or other symptoms, such as lethargy, accompany drooling, then your cat should be seen by a vet.

Why is my cat drooling and opening and closing mouth?

Mouth disease or tooth decay are common causes of drooling in cats. The buildup of tartar can rub against the inside of your cat’s mouth, causing irritation, discomfort and odor. To check for this, gently pull your cat’s lip back and take a look at their teeth.

Cats in general are not prone to drooling. Because it is uncommon, getting a veterinary assessment is the best course of action, to determine whether the hypersalivation is harmless or serious. The earlier that a health issue is detected, the more likely it can be successfully treated. Secondary bacterial infections can develop if mouth injuries are left too long.

Certain diseases, injuries, and viruses can also cause a cat to drool excessively. All of these secondary signs should be noted, as they can make identifying the health problem easier.

Excessive drooling (sometimes lasting for hours) Blood in the saliva Bad breath Inability to eat or drink Swelling or masses in the mouth Vomiting Pawing at the mouth Weakness Lethargy Swollen lymph nodes Labored breathing The cause of the excessive drooling may be local to the mouth, or may be a sign of an internal problem. Excitement Nervousness Being near appetizing food Poisoning (from a variety of sources) Medication side effects Foreign body stuck in mouth tissue Teething (in kittens) Injury to the tongue or mouth Insect stings Gingivitis and other gum disease Abscessed tooth Stomatitis (inflammation of the mouth and lips) Acid reflux Rabies Pseudorabies Cancer of the mouth Nausea Upper respiratory infection Liver shunt Chronic kidney failure Heat stroke Viruses (such as feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus or feline herpesvirus)

When bringing your cat to a veterinarian, be sure to provide the cats full medical history to help sort out potential underlying causes of excessive drooling. The veterinarian will look for obvious injuries, abscesses, foreign objects, or masses within the mouth. Full blood work will likely be recommended, including a complete blood count to help detect anemia or the presence of cancer, and a biochemical profile to find signs of metabolic disease.

A bile acid blood test will indicate the function of the liver. Cultures of the urine may identify bacterial infections present in the body. X-rays or ultrasounds may be used to assess organ health or to locate tumors or lesions in the mouth or body.

If your cat has been poisoned, the stomach may need to be emptied, depending on the timing. Certain medications may be administered to counteract the effects of the poison and activated charcoal may be given to stop toxin absorption in the body. Both radiation therapy and chemotherapy may be used to fight cancer on a microscopic level.

This includes intravenous fluid administration, medications, humidifier use and appetite stimulants. These complications may require ongoing care and medication application for the remainder of the cats life. Special diets may need to be followed to help alleviate these organ problems.

To remove a foreign body causing salivation, the cat may need to be sedated. If surgery has been part of your cats treatment, you will need to follow all at-home care guidelines provided by the veterinarian. This will include monitoring your cat for signs of infection near the incision site.

Your veterinarian will have you return for follow-up appointments to see how the surgery site is healing and to assess the overall health of the cat. The prognosis greatly depends on the type of health issue that has been diagnosed. Dental issues generally resolve with surgical repair, cleaning, and a good oral health routine.

Kidney and liver disease prognoses are guarded, and often require lifelong treatment. If the underlying cause of the infection is a virus, it may stay in the cats system permanently. Vaccines to prevent rabies should be a part of your annual veterinary visit.

may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. I apologize for the delay, this venue is not set up for urgent emails. If they are still having any problems, It would be best to have your pet seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine them, see what might be going on, and get any testing or treatment taken care of that might be needed.

Her cancer is well managed and at her last oncologist visit, her numbers were good (just 2 weeks ago). Im tempted to write it off as officially now being a senior cat, or even as being on prednisolone for a year. Cats will drool sometimes if they are nervous, nauseous, painful, or have dental disease.

If she recently got a checkup and seems to be doing well, and does not have any dental disease or infected teeth, and is not nauseous., this may be something she’s doing because she’s happy. If you notice any kind of odor from her mouth, or her appetite seems down or less than normal, or she is vomiting, then it would be best to have her seen by your veterinarian to make sure that things are okay.

Ah, the old saying, Cats rule, dogs drool. We cat lovers know that our four-legged friends are fastidious groomers in other words, they like to stay clean. So cats rarely drool the way that our canine companions do.

However, if your cat has a lot of tartar (hardened plaque) over the tooth, it may hide the gum lesion. When these levels build up in the blood stream, they result in uremic ulcers in the mouth, esophagus and stomach.

IV fluids Blood work monitoring Medication A low protein diet Stomach protectants Thankfully, insoluble calcium oxalate plants are minimally poisonous to cats, but they can result in severe drooling. Typically, veterinary attention isnt necessary with these types of insoluble calcium oxalate plants unless profuse vomiting and inappetance is noted.

Keeping your cat indoors will help minimize any risk of trauma (e.g., being hit by a car, attacked by a dog, etc.). As an emergency critical care specialist, I often see cats develop severe jaw fractures after undergoing trauma, and a luxated tempomandibular joint or jaw fracture can result in severe drooling (due to the inability to close the mouth). Unusual foreign bodies can get caught in the tongue, soft or hard palate or back of the throat, resulting in oral pain, drooling, and inability to close the mouth.

When in doubt, check with your veterinarian for an examination to make sure there isnt an underlying cause for drooling cats.

Is It Normal for Cats to Drool?

Cats drooling when they are happy and relaxed, for example, drooling while being petted, can be normal behavior. Usually, these kitties adopt this behavior early in life, so it would not be typical for an older cat to start drooling suddenly if they hadn’t before. If this happens, you should call your vet to talk about your cat’s sudden drooling.So how can you tell the difference between normal cat drooling and drooling that’s a sign of a problem?

Why Do Cats Drool?

There are several underlying health conditions that can cause cats to drool. The following are the most common.

Upper Respiratory Infections

Cats with dental disease, which can consist of gingivitis (gum inflammation), stomatitis (oral inflammation), tartar, and cat cavities (feline oral resorptive lesions or FORL(s)) can drool.In addition to drooling, a cat with dental disease may:Your veterinarian can perform an oral exam to evaluate your cat for the presence of dental disease. If dental disease is found, they will also recommend a dental treatment. Unlike humans, cats do not sit still for a dental cleaning or for dental x-rays to be taken, so anesthesia is needed during your cat’s oral exam to do the best treatment possible.

Nausea

Cats that are drooling and not eating could be nauseous. Your cat may have a history of vomiting in addition to drooling, but this is not always the case. Cats can become nauseous for several reasons.

A Blockage in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) foreign body blockage is one cause of nausea in cats, which can lead to drooling. Your vet would need to do a physical exam to determine if there is a blockage. Vets sometimes will find a string or ribbon stuck under the cat’s tongue, which often extends down further into the cat’s GI tract (stomach, small intestine).If there is concern that your cat may have a gastric (stomach) or small intestinal foreign body that’s not associated with a string/ribbon, your veterinarian will recommend imaging such as x-rays and/or abdominal ultrasound.

Underlying Health Condition

Diseases such as liver (hepatic) disease, renal (kidney) disease, pancreatitis, hyperthyroidism, and diabetic ketoacidosis, just to name a few, are other potential causes for nausea and drooling. These disease conditions are diagnosed by testing your cat’s blood and urine.If your cat has inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or cancer (neoplasia), this can cause physical changes in their stomach and intestine due to thickening of the stomach/intestinal walls, which can cause nausea and drooling. If your veterinarian suspects either of these disease processes, they may recommend abdominal ultrasound, endoscopy, or biopsy of the affected tissue.

Trauma

Unfortunately, cats are at risk for developing cancer, just like humans. If a cat has a cancerous mass involving the tongue or back of the throat, they may:

Bitter Taste

Cats can drool if they taste something bitter, such as oral medications. The drool can be quite dramatic in this case. Try offering water or a treat after medicating your cat to help wash the bad taste out of their mouth.