Why Is It So Hard to Adopt a Dog From a Rescue?

The 23-year-old paralegal spent the first part of her afternoon in McCarren Park, envying the happy dog owners with their furry companions. Then she stumbled upon an adoption event in a North Brooklyn beer garden, where a beagle mix being paraded out of the rescue van reminded her of the dog she grew up with, Snickers. It all felt like fate, so she filled out an application on the spot. She was then joined by her best friend and roommate, Alexa, in sitting across from a serious-looking young woman with a ponytail who was searching for a reason to break her heart.

Believing they were out of earshot, the volunteer summed up the interview to a colleague: You just walked by, and youre fixated on this one dog, and its because you had a beagle growing up, but you want to make your roommate the legal adopter? Tinder for dogs, and various animal-shelter Instagram accounts that send cute puppy pics with heartrending stories of need into your feed and compel you to fill out an adoption application as you sit on the toilet.

This deluge of rescue-puppy content has arrived, not coincidentally, during a time of growing awareness of puppy mills as so morally indefensible that even Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez could draw fire for seemingly buying a purebred French bulldog in early 2020. Then came the pandemic puppy boom, a lonely, claustrophobic year in which thousands of white-collar workers, sitting at home scrolling through their phones, seemed simultaneously to decide they were finally ready to adopt a dog. And yet someone has to pick the winners often an unpaid millennial Miss Hannigan doling out a precious number of wet-nosed Orphan Annies to wannabe Daddy Warbuckses and thus empowered to judge the intentions and poop-scooping abilities of otherwise accomplished urban professionals, some of whom actually did go to Harvard.

It got another boost in the years following World War II, when Americans were moving out to the suburbs in droves, according to Stephen Zawistowski, a professor of animal behavior at Hunter College. If this volunteer had felt so powerful, I wish that they had said we wouldnt be able to handle this dog. Although Stevens Instagram is replete with photos of other friends dogs, evidence of Coopers existence has disappeared from the account. Figuring that online volunteer work might fill the void, she started helping another organization wade through its massive backlog of applications by calling references.

Instead of rejecting applicants outright based on their giving the wrong answers, Zierings team speaks with hopeful dog owners at length, learning about their lifestyles and histories to match them with the pet best for their family. Many young professionals are finding that, when given the option between scrolling through rescue websites until 2 a.m. or doing drunken karaoke in a room full of friends, Dog Tinder is losing its appeal.

Why is it so hard to get approved to adopt a dog?

“People who end up being fantastic adopters often don’t meet the arduous requirements of a shelter,” Weiss said. Reasons for rejection may include having lost a pet. … “If you don’t get a pet from an animal welfare organization, that dog or cat is probably a lot less likely to be vaccinated or spayed or neutered.”

How long does it take to adopt a dog from a rescue?

How Long Does it Take to Adopt a Pet From a Humane Society or Shelter? Typically, many people are able to walk into a Humane society/shelter and take home a new furry friend that same day, with the process typically taking an hour or two.

Which dogs are least likely to be adopted?

The American Staffordshire Terrier is the least likely breed to be adopted. The chances are even worse for Staffordshire Terrier’s who are not babies, as they get adopted at a rate of less than 50%. Chihuahuas and pit bull terriers are the two most common breeds available, and also among the least likely to be adopted.

Can you adopt a puppy from a rescue?

Helping animals in need. If you adopt a puppy from a shelter, you are not only changing its life. Your decision will also help animal rescue work and open up space for another puppy in need. Additionally, your adoption fee will be used towards helping other animals.

– 9 reasons why dog adoption applications get denied#1: Not meeting the space and security requirements#2: Not having their own place#3: Having children and other pets#4: Not always at home#5: Family members must be on board#6: Unsuitable lifestyle#7: Lack of experience with the breed of choice#8: Not attending to medical needs#9: History of rehoming a dog

If rescues are making it impossible for people to adopt one. 9 common reasons why adoption applications are getting denied.

Its hard to adopt a dog from a rescue because of specific requirements that may vary from each center. It can also be due to a long complicated process, high demand, and volunteer shortage. Dogs in rescue centers have had a rough life.

So finding people who would truly take care of them is an important task. Ensuring selected applicants are capable of taking good care of them for a long time. And also, for the landlords number if the candidate is living in a rented apartment.

They do this to ensure the person is telling the truth about his or her life situation. Like finding a new place to live due to landlord disapproval. And prefer people who mostly stay at home and dont travel a lot.

Many people may find adopting a dog ridiculous due to its long and complex process. Theyll ask for detailed information, including but not limited to an applicants: To make sure the dog theyre taking in will live in a safe environment.

Like online Zoom classes, home checks and meetings are also done virtually nowadays. If theyre too fast about the evaluation, it could result in a returned dog. If their rules are too loose, they can entrust a dog to some people who are not yet ready to have one.

However, due to the same reason, many aspiring parents with good intentions may lose hope. As their dog adoption application keeps on being denied. Well, such rules are made with the dogs safety and applicants in mind.

And children may also injure a tiny pooch due to mishandling. Is it also the same? Aside from the U.S, it is also hard to adopt a dog in U.K rescue shelters. So after many denied applications, some people there decided to adopt rescue dogs from other countries instead.

And found that people in the UK who had this problem imported their Fidos from: So medical screening and constant monitoring of the dogs shall be made. They witness pooches hurting physically or emotionally due to cruelty.

To ensure the same scenario wont happen again to those innocent dogs. This is another reason why adopting a dog from a rescue group is hard. Theyre doing it to ensure an aspiring parent will adopt a pooch who fits him or her well.

As not only itll be heartbreaking for the applicant, but also even more difficult for dogs. So once the center entrusts them to their parents, theyre hoping theyll be their fur-ever home. This is why rescue groups get a ridiculous amount of pet adoption applications daily.

Covid influx Research says that theres a 250% increase in dog and cat adoptions since last year, 2020. An enclosed yard is required for a secured play area. Also, certain breeds can easily jump over them like Huskies the famous escape artists .

Like, What if the next place theyre living in doesnt allow pets? So lively large ones may knock, hurt, or scare small kids. While tiny or nervous Fidos may feel uncomfortable in a busy environment.

Or get injured by young children who dont know how to properly handle a dog. Those who work long hours 5 times a week and travel a lot are also deemed unfit. As centers believe that rescue dogs need full attention.

People can also be denied because they didnt previously own a dog of the same breed. Centers can also reject an application if the person has rehomed a dog before. Reality check, most centers receive many emails a day for one dog.

As long as youre polite to say youve already adopted one if another group calls. A friend of mine recently adopted a dog from a shelter. And it took him around 6 months to finally bring his furry buddy home.

Mind you, within that period, he was visiting the shelter every Saturday to walk his favorite dog, Almond. Before the official adoption, he was allowed to take care of the Fido for a while. One aspiring dog adopter also shared her experience in a forum on why she was denied by a rescue.

She owns her home, has an enclosed garden, and lives in a quiet area with nice scenery. Resides where the dog was rescued (The shelter didnt explain why.

Dogs are great. Cant everyone have one? I want one now! Well, adopting a dog isnt quite as simple as pressing purchase. But why is this? What is the process for adoption? What do you have to keep in mind? And why is it so hard to adopt a dog?

We know the temptation can be to get a new puppy that has no previous history from a breeder, but the dogs in shelters are often in desperate need of a loving home. Far too many people buy dogs without doing any research, leading them to making poor decisions.

Adopting a dog from a shelter often carries an upfront cost, and food and medical bills can reach hundreds or even thousands per month. Of course, no family will be perfect, but will your home environment make it difficult to raise a dog? Some breeds carry a lot of health problems and arent suitable if you are on a budget.

Words can say a lot but the best thing you can do is go visit your new potential pet at the shelter (COVID permitting). Dont discount the dogs that are older, ill or just not perfect they may have the biggest heart. Most shelters have a complicated adoption process This may seem restrictive, but they are designed to ensure dogs get matched with the perfect family to avoid the heartbreak of people handing back dogs a few months later if it doesnt work out.

Some may even ask to visit your home (or view a socially-distanced video) to check the environment is safe for a dog. Unfortunately, this process means the dog you had your eye on may not be suitable for you You may face being rejected multiple times. It is better to have the temporary upset of being rejected by a shelter than having to distress a dog by handing them back.

It also often covers microchipping, vaccination, flea treatment and even things like collars and bowls. Dogs today can sell for thousands of pounds, but shelters try to keep adoption fees low. Make sure you have all the food, toys, bedding and everything else they need, get insurance sorted , and register them with your local vet.

They first approached a rescue group specializing in French bulldogs, since we love everything about that breed, Rebekah Patin said. The group had three dogs that seemed like a good fit. The Patins put in an adoption application and promptly got turned down.

Donna Darrell, founder of the New York City-based nonprofit organization Pound Hounds ResQ , said her group has a long and difficult adoption process by design. But that view is increasingly being challenged by groups including the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals whose own president and chief executive, Matthew Bershadker, says he was turned down when he and his family looked for a dog about a year and a half ago.

If the process is this hard for the leader of one of the nations largest animal charities, its clearly overly restrictive, Bershadker said. A phrase thats used a lot in this context is removing barriers to adoption . The application process tends to be based in conversations, not criteria. Organizations practicing open adoptions generally do not do home visits or phone landlords to make sure pets are allowed.

I think it hurts us as a movement, said Sheila DArpino, director of research at Maddies Fund , a foundation that works to lower euthanasia rates in shelters. An estimated 14,000 animal shelters and pet rescue groups operate in the United States, and they do so essentially autonomously free to use whatever adoption procedures they deem best.

#1: Specific requirements

Dogs in rescue centers have had a rough life.They were either abandoned or abused by their previous keepers. So finding people who would truly take care of them is an important task.This is why organizations put up certain requirements. By doing this, they’re ‘filtering’ people out. Ensuring selected applicants are capable of taking good care of them for a long time.Since, well, having any pet is a lifetime commitment. It’s like having a child and definitely not easy (

So what will they require?

Centers will need references. Like the number of the applicant’s vet. This is to see if he or she attends to the pet’s medical needs. And to get an opinion if he or she is reliable as a potential adopter.And also, for the landlord’s number if the candidate is living in a rented apartment. They do this to ensure the person is telling the truth about his or her life situation.Plus, to prevent any issues after adoption that might stress the dog out. Like finding a new place to live due to landlord disapproval.This is why lying on a pet adoption application will not work.Some centers may also require a fenced yard. And prefer people who mostly stay at home and don’t travel a lot.Actually, the list goes on. But the detailed requirements will be discussed shortly.So stay for a bit. 🙂

Why are they doing this?

Many people may find adopting a dog ridiculous due to its long and complex process.This is also why some give up in the middle of the application. Or after failing one.First will be filling up forms. Followed by interviews.They’ll ask for detailed information, including but not limited to an applicant’s:Then check the house of the applicants. To make sure the dog they’re taking in will live in a safe environment. And one that suits their needs.One thought…
Like online Zoom classes, home checks and meetings are also done virtually nowadays.But back to the topic.

#4: They’ve seen the worst scenarios

Not all rescue groups are the same. Although most policies are similar, there are some that might cause many to raise an eyebrow.From things like requiring them to purchase an organic blanket. To requirements that some people can’t meet. Such as not having any children, other pets, or a full-time job.
Well, such rules are made with the dog’s safety and applicants’ in mind.This is because some doggos may be vulnerable or cause harm to small kids. Their nipping can leave scratches on a kid. And children may also injure a tiny pooch due to mishandling.Also, dogs will require full attention. And it isn’t ideal to leave them alone for long hours. Or else, they may get lonely or depressed.Aside from the U.S, it is also hard to adopt a dog in U.K rescue shelters.This is because they’re also strict and prefer a household without any pets and children.So after many denied applications, some people there decided to adopt rescue dogs from other countries instead. Because they have an easier process due to more flexible rules.A study investigated more on this matter. And found that people in the UK who had this problem imported their Fidos from:

#5: To avoid the possibility of rehoming

Dog rescues are being too picky?They’re doing it to ensure an aspiring parent will adopt a pooch who fits him or her well.This is to reduce the chances of rehoming. As not only it’ll be heartbreaking for the applicant, but also even more difficult for dogs.These Fidos have been moved a lot. And suffered from countless rejections. So once the center entrusts them to their parents, they’re hoping they’ll be their

#6: High demand

Well, you might not be the only person who’s reading this right now. There are others out there who are hoping to adopt one too.This is why rescue groups get a ridiculous amount of pet adoption applications daily. And they also observed that there’s a higher demand for dogs now.And it’s due to

‘Covid influx’

Research says that there’s a 250% increase in dog and cat adoptions since last year, 2020.Why’s that so?The pandemic made everyone stay more inside their houses. Because of this, many people thought of getting a company – a dog.

#7: Volunteer shortage

One problem with some dog rescue groups?Numbered volunteers.Rescues are private organizations. And they mainly rely on them.There’s already a high demand for adoption even before. So volunteers need to check many applications.But these people have full-time jobs. As well as families. So they only work in their free time.Which can also be a factor for the long waiting time.

#2: Not having their own place

What are some basic reasons for denying dog/pet adoption?An enclosed yard is required for a secured play area.Some require the fence to be at least 6 ft. (1.8 m.) high. Because most rescue doggos will be scared at first. And may tend to run away.Also, certain breeds can easily jump over them like Huskies –

#3: Having children and other pets

Centers usually know the nature of their dogs.So lively large ones may knock, hurt, or scare small kids. While tiny or nervous Fidos may feel uncomfortable in a ‘busy’ environment. Or get injured by young children who don’t know how to properly handle a dog.Also, some hounds might have issues living with other animals.

#4: Not always at home

Those who work long hours 5 times a week and travel a lot are also deemed unfit. As centers believe that rescue dogs need full attention. So it’s not a good idea to leave them alone for lengthy periods.

#5: Family members must be on board

Applicants’ family or partners, must also be on the same boat as them. Meaning, everyone is willing to take care of the dog. And no one is allergic to them.This is to ensure that the Fido will have a welcoming environment to live in.

#6: Unsuitable lifestyle

Application forms will have questions about habits. To know what dog suits them best.For example, taking care of energetic breeds may be difficult for a non-active person. While pups who love laying down might not fit an active individual.

#8: Not attending to medical needs

Rescuers will also check veterinary records. To see if the applicant’s pets were vaccinated. As well as if they’re spayed or neutered.If they’re not, they’ll consider the applicant unfit to own a new dog. Because providing their medical needs is necessary.

#9: History of rehoming a dog

Centers can also reject an application if the person has rehomed a dog before. They may think that it could happen again. And they don’t want to risk it.

#1: Apply to many rescue groups

Reality check, most centers receive many emails a day for one dog. This is why your chances are slim.So, don’t be afraid to send in many applications to different rescues.It isn’t unethical. As long as you’re polite to say you’ve already adopted one if another group calls. Or kindly say that the dog they have isn’t the right match.There are other rescues near your area. So check them out. See if there’s a dog that you may like or fits you.

#2: Don’t be shy to follow up

Volunteers have limited work time. So they’ll only have a few minutes to scan your form. And decide whether you deserve a second look or not.So before sending your application, make sure:

#3: Try to foster instead

There are centers with limited capacity. So they can’t cater to all dogs or animals. And if you want to help and take care of one, this could be the way.Search for other rescue groups. See if they need more foster parents.According to PetMD, this may take 10 to 12 weeks. So it wouldn’t be that long.These dogs are also up for adoption. So if you get too attached, it’ll be hard. But there are also chances that you’ll end up keeping them.Good luck! 🙂

Dog parent #1:

A friend of mine recently adopted a dog from a shelter. And it took him around 6 months to finally bring his furry buddy home.Mind you, within that period, he was visiting the shelter every Saturday to walk his favorite dog, Almond.Before the official adoption, he was allowed to take care of the Fido for a while. As they bonded more and got to know each other better, my friend decided that Almond is ‘the one’.They also asked to see the contract and the details of the landlord. This was to verify my friend was telling the truth. And to ensure that dogs are allowed in his place.The whole process had my friend thinking that he constantly had to prove himself. But it only made him want to take care of Almond more!And now he’s sending videos to the shelter via WhatsApp. So the volunteers and workers at the shelter are at peace. 🙂