Why Does My Dog Poop So Much?

It is an inescapable truth that being a pet parent means dealing with pee, poop, and other types of natural messes. There is no space for squeamishness.

We are talking about when you find that you need to pull out the pooper scooper more often, or that your dog seems to be producing excessively large piles of the smelly stuff. Read on as we go through how much poop your dog should be producing, and the main warning signs that something might not be right with their stool.

What is normal pooping depends on the individual dog, so the main things to look out for are changes in their bathroom habits. You wouldnt expect a pinscher to produce the same amount of poop as a Labrador retriever. Healthy poop should be compact, moist, and hold its shape when picked up (in a plastic bag or pooper scooper, of course).

Runny and watery poop suggests that something has entered their digestive system and upset it. Green poop can indicate gallbladder problems, stress, or eating too much grass. Any red streaks suggest blood and that they may have a cut around the anus area.

White poop that looks like grains of rice suggests tapeworms, but if its chalky it might be too much calcium. There are a lot of different things that could undermine your dogs intestinal equilibrium and result in them pooping more voluminously, more often, or both. When your pup looks up at you with hungry eyes even though they have just eaten, it can be hard to say no to a treat or to not put a little extra in their bowl.

There are plenty of foods, including flavorings that we dont even consider when mentally checking the ingredients list, that are fine for humans but dangerous for dogs. Many dogs develop this habit, and it is not good for them in terms of the number of calories, and you cant monitor what exactly they are eating. A dogs stomach becomes accustomed to certain foods, and when you completely change what they are getting in their bowl, it can take a while for the bowels to adjust.

After a maximum of two weeks, they should return to normal, but you can avoid this happening by gradually moving them onto a new diet. Over a period of about a week, change the ratio of old to new food, until after about seven days when they are fully on the new diet. The wrong kind of food can not only lead to unusual bowel movements, but can be detrimental to their overall health.

Choosing a good quality food with lots of proteins from fresh meat, moderate healthy fats, and not too many carbohydrates is a great place to start. Excessive bowel movements is one of the signs to look out for that shows that your selected food doesnt have the right nutrient mix for your pup. Dogs are creatures of habit, and changes in their environment can throw their regular, healthy bathroom cycle off-kilter.

If this takes more than a few weeks, it might be worth considering if there are other underlying causes for the problem. These can cause cramps, diarrhea, intestinal upsets, and kidney disorders in both dogs and humans. One of the first signs of stress and depression in dogs is irregular bowel movement.

This could include more whining and barking than normal, pacing and shaking, excessive shedding and panting. The other thing to do is create a safe place for them in the home that is all theirs and that feels 100 percent secure. All of these bags will trap in smells and mess when used, but will ensure that your dogs poop doesnt sit in the landfill for decades when it could be broken down.

Any change in diet can also provoke additional pooping as their body adjusts. Healthy poop should be more or less the color of milk chocolate, and should be compact, moist, and hold its shape when picked up. But if your dog is consistently producing poop of an unusual color, it is time to talk to your vet.

Generally, a bigger concern than the frequency or quantity of your dogs poop is its consistency. If it has a significantly different color, such as yellow, black, or gray, this is another big warning sign that something is not quite right with your dog. If your dog does seem to be pooping more than usual, there are a variety of potential causes, but the first thing to consider is diet.

What causes excessive pooping in dogs?

Stress colitis is one of the leading causes of large bowel diarrhea in all dogs. Whatever the cause, the inflammation in the colon results in reduced water absorption and decreased ability to store feces in the colon. This causes the classic symptom of frequent small amounts of diarrhea, often with mucus or blood.

Is it normal for a dog to poop 6 times a day?

The Normal Bowel Movement For Dogs. You shouldn’t worry too much about the frequency though, because it will vary depending on diet, age, and overall digestive health. With diet, if your dog is eating too much, it’s likely that he will do his business up to five times a day or even more.

Is it normal for a dog to poop 4 times a day?

Frequency. The number of times your dog poops each day should be consistent – whether that’s once or four times per day. As long as it is the same every day, there’s no need to worry. Typically, most pups will go once or twice a day – although some may go four or more times!

Is it normal for my dog to poop 10 times a day?

Most dogs poop between 1 and 5 times per day. Puppies or older dogs who eat frequent small meals may be on the higher end of this scale. Dogs with health issues may poop more or less depending on the nature of their issues.

Perhaps the least joyful part of dog ownership is picking up their poop. And, if youve noticed that your dogs poop has increased in frequency, that could be a reason to be concerned. Most dogs have consistent food and predictable routines, so changes to poop might be a sign of illness and could require a trip to the vet. However, you may first want to look through these reasons that dogs bowel movements change and see if you can address the problem yourself.

For example, antibiotics commonly cause some tummy trouble, especially if you cant get your dog to eat some food when you administer the medication. However, if your dog suddenly has more frequent poop after a visit to the vets office, it could also mean that their condition is getting worse.

A healthy dog poop chart can be highly useful for pet parents. Whether you like it or not, youll have to deal with your fair share of poop in your poochs lifetime. However, you might want to slow down as you reach for the pooper scooper and take a second to learn more about your dogs digestive health.

If youve recently changed food, its normal to expect some stool variation in the first few days so dont panic. On the other hand, smaller poops may be a sign of a loss of appetite due to an illness or a blockage in their digestive process.

If your pooch is a little older or suffers with joint issues, they may not be able to stay in the right position for long enough to produce a perfect poop. Black / tarry Could be a sign of internal bleeding in the stomach or small intestines, which requires urgent attention. White / chalky This is usually due to an excess of calcium and other minerals and is typically observed in dogs with a raw diet.

The main thing to bear in mind when it comes to your puppys poop is that it is directly influenced by their diet. Regular exercise , a stress-free environment and the right diet should keep your poochs digestion running smoothly and save you from cleaning up even messier messes!

If you share a dog with a spouse, partner or another housemate, you might find yourself asking each other if the dog pooped, when the dog pooped or otherwise reporting on the status of your pups poops! No one is really sure why they do this, but we know poop is a good indicator of good digestive health in your dog. Learn more about what makes a good healthy poop and how often your pup should do it!

If your pups digestive issues dont resolve in a few days, you may want to reach out to your vet or a trainer to help them manage their stress and feel better. Your pups doctor may ask for a stool sample to see if they can find the cause of the illness and provide the correct treatment!

If your pup seems constipated (cant poop), is hunching but nothing is coming out, is vomiting or appears to have abdominal pain, you should get them to the vet to be checked for a blockage. Blockages are commonly caused by pups swallowing toys, rawhide, sticks, rocks or other household items. To prevent blockages, provide toys that are size appropriate for your dog and supervise your pup closely when chewing treats, bones and bully sticks.

While a little digestive distress is a fact of life for most of us including our pups, there are definitely some things you can do to help your best friend feel better fast.

Changes in Diet

Even perfectly healthy dogs will experience some stomach upset if their dog food changes dramatically. If you’ve recently given your dog a new kind of dog food, they may have frequent diarrhea. Next time, try to ease them into it by mixing the new and old food for a few days, slowly increasing the percentage of new food.New treats may also be the cause of your dog’s stomach issues or foods he or she accidentally got into. If your pup raids your garbage or steals food off your plate, it’s wise to expect a bit of stomach problems. Just check that what he or she at isn’t dangerous or deadly to dogs.Bowel changes may also be a sign of allergies or food intolerance. If you’ve given your dog some new food and they respond poorly, it may be best to avoid that food going forward.

Infections and Illnesses

Dogs get stomach bugs just as humans do. Plus, more serious illnesses can cause your dog to poop more often than is healthy. Parasites, bacterial infections, and a handful of dog viruses might all be the culprit. If you suspect your dog has an infection or illness, a vet can help.

Medications

Has your dog already been to the vet? In that case, the medications they received from the vet could be the cause of an upset stomach. For example, antibiotics commonly cause some tummy trouble, especially if you can’t get your dog to eat some food when you administer the medication.However, if your dog suddenly has more frequent poop after a visit to the vet’s office, it could also mean that their condition is getting worse. Only the vet can tell you if you should be concerned, so give them a call.

Stress and Routine Change

Some humans get an upset stomach when they are stressed, and some dogs do the same. If your dog has a reason to feel very stressed, they could poop more frequently. They might feel more stressed if you move, add a new animal to the household, add a new family member, or make other major changes to the dynamic of the home or the home itself.Routine change can expose your dog to some new foods or substances that they might eat. For example, if you move to a new home, you’ll want to check the yard to make sure there’s nothing in the yard that they might eat that could be dangerous.

The perfect poop

Just like us humans, all dogs are different. Their toilet habits are different too. With that in mind, it’s important to get to know your pup right away and understand what is normal for them. That way, you will be able to recognise any changes in their stools.While there can be slight differences depending on the pooch, our healthy dog poop chart covers a few things to look out for that are a sign of a healthy dog poop

Consistency

When cleaning up after your pooch, many of us don’t like to think too much about what’s inside the plastic bag we’re holding. But it’s important to consider the consistency of your dog’s poo as you pick it up, as this can be a sign of other issues.Healthy dog poop should be compact, moist and hold its shape when picked up. If the poo is runny or watery, this could be a sign of intestinal upset – maybe your pup has eaten something they shouldn’t. Similarly, if the poop feels too hard or dry, your pooch may be suffering from dehydration or constipation. If you notice a change in your dog’s poo consistency, make sure to discuss it with your vet. If you’ve recently changed food, it’s normal to expect some stool variation in the first few days so don’t panic. If things haven’t settled down after 2 weeks then review. Often it’s a case of feeding too much. If you’re not sure how you should be feeding your doggy, why not give our feeding calculator a go for a rough guideline. Feeding guidelines are just guidelines after all, so try reducing the amount you feed and see if that helps.

Size

It goes without saying that the size of your pooch’s poop depends on the size of the dog itself. There’s no way a Yorkshire Terrier will produce as much poo as a Great Dane! But generally speaking, your pooch should produce poops around the same size as the food portions they are eating.The key thing to look out for when it comes to poop size is any noticeable changes. Larger than normal poos may mean that your pup’s food isn’t being digested as it should, and they are not getting the necessary nutrients out of it. On the other hand, smaller poops may be a sign of a loss of appetite due to an illness or a blockage in their digestive process.

Frequency

The number of times your dog poops each day should be consistent – whether that’s once or four times per day. As long as it is the same every day, there’s no need to worry. Typically, most pups will go once or twice a day – although some may go four or more times! Our Smudge loves to go three times and spreads it out during her walkies. If we’re lucky she occasionally plans it right next to the poo bin.It’s important to pay attention to how many poops you’re scooping each day to understand how your pooch is doing. If they go from being a regular once-a-day-er to needing to go four or five times, they could be having some digestion problems and need to see the vet.

Shape

Typically, your pup’s poop should be shaped like a log and maintain its shape when picked up or moved. Look out for pebble-like or rounded poops as this could be a sign of dehydration or stiff joints.If your pooch is a little older or suffers with joint issues, they may not be able to stay in the right position for long enough to produce a perfect poop. In this case, you may want to consult a vet and give them something to soften their stools to make things a little easier.

1. Color

Your vet will expect to see a healthy brown colored stool, that looks like a tootsie roll. Healthy stool gets its brown color from the bile your pup’s digestive system uses to break down the food they eat. There may be some variety to the color based on the food your pup eats and how well hydrated they are. If your vet sees black stool (potential bleeding in the upper GI tract), stool with red streaks (bleeding in the lower GI tract), stool that is grey or yellow like clay (issues with the pancreas or gallbladder) they may express some concern and run more tests to determine the exact cause.

2. Consistency

Like the Bristol stool scale for humans, there is a similar scale that vets use for our pups. The scale goes from 1 (small hard pellets) to 7 (loose runny unformed stool). Ironically (or not actually) the ideal poo consistency for your pup is a number 2! While super hard or super soft stool once in a while is not a major cause for concern if everything else is normal, you should have your pup checked out if their stool is hard or soft consistently or if you see other symptoms.

3. Content

While your vet doesn’t expect you to go digging around in your dog’s poop – someone on their staff will! What they are looking for includes fur, foreign materials, and parasites including worms! Since your pup poops outside, it is important to get a fresh sample that has not been contaminated by outdoor pests or other contaminants.

4. Coating

Your pup’s poop should not have any kind of coating. You should be able to pick it up off the ground or grass easily and not leave much of a mess. A mucous coating on your dog’s poop could indicate large bowel inflammation or diarrhea. If you see a small amount of blood on your pup’s poop it could just be from straining. If you see it more then once, call your vet!

Dietary change

Did you switch your pup from kibble to fresh food, like Ollie? Did your pup eat too many pieces of sweet potato chew or have a marrow bone that is high in fat? All of these are reasons why your pup’s poop might be different. If you made a change to their diet, the change in poop frequency could be the new normal. If you are making changes to your pet’s diet remember to make the change gradually and give your pup’s belly a few days to get used to the new food. If your pup ate too much sweet potato, pumpkin or another delicious treat, you might see some funny colored stool once or twice, but that is nothing to panic about. However, too much fat can lead to an upset stomach and some runny stool. That is one you want to be careful about! Dogs can get sick or gain weight too quickly if their diets contain too much fat. Make sure you know your pup’s daily requirement and try to stay in that range. This includes food and treats!

Stress

If your pup is under any sort of stress or feeling nervous, they may poop more or less frequently or even have diarrhea. Situations where you may see this include bringing home a new rescue, traveling with your dog, any change in their schedule, like if you get a new job and you’re at home less or your schedule is different. Your pup may also get stressed if you have a new baby, a new housemate or even if you move to a new house. If your pups digestive issues don’t resolve in a few days, you may want to reach out to your vet or a trainer to help them manage their stress and feel better.

Illness

Like us, our pups can get sick if they eat something that is bad. Eating something off the sidewalk, digging in the trash or even just picking up a stomach bug that is going around can cause your pup’s poop to be abnormal. If your pup’s symptoms haven’t resolved after 24 hours of a bland diet, you should have them checked out by a vet. Your pup’s doctor may ask for a stool sample to see if they can find the cause of the illness and provide the correct treatment!

Blockage

If your pup seems constipated (can’t poop), is hunching but nothing is coming out, is vomiting or appears to have abdominal pain, you should get them to the vet to be checked for a blockage. This can occur if your pup eats something that gets stuck in their stomachs and can’t come out. Blockages are commonly caused by pups swallowing toys, rawhide, sticks, rocks or other household items. To prevent blockages, provide toys that are size appropriate for your dog and supervise your pup closely when chewing treats, bones and bully sticks.