Why Does My Dog Bark in His Sleep?

You hear Rover frequently making yipping and yapping sounds at night. Then it progresses into a bark. When you get out of bed to check on him, hes sound asleep on his side. You go back to bed thinking you were just hearing things. A few nights later, it happens again, but this time when you check on him, hes lying down in his bed; his ears twitch and paws are moving like hes running. It might seem peculiar, but its actually very normal. If you try to wake your pup, youre going to interrupt his deep sleep where he is dreaming of chasing squirrels, playing with other dogs, or getting a rewarding belly rub.

If you check on your noisy friend and notice his body is moving uncontrollably, hes panting or cant catch his breath, whimpering to indicate pain, you should wake him up.

Should I wake my dog up if he is barking in his sleep?

Barking during sleep is not a bad thing for your dog to do. … You should not wake him up because you will not only disrupt his sleep cycle, but it could startle him. Of course, as a creature who loves sleep as well, you know how bothersome it is to be woken up in the middle of the night.

Is it okay for dogs to bark in their sleep?

Running, Twitching, and Barking. This includes rapid eye movement, otherwise known as REM sleep, during which dreaming occurs. Many dogs try to physically act out their dreams–which often involves reliving memories of what they did that day–and this is the cause of sleep running, barking, and twitching.

How do you know when a dog is having a nightmare?

Growling..Barking..Whining..Panting..Tense jaw..Twitching whiskers..Sweaty paws..Whimpering.

What do dogs dream about when they sleep?

When Fido’s legs twitch in his sleep, is he really dreaming of chasing rabbits? Probably, researchers say. The “rabbits” part is up for debate, but the scientific evidence strongly suggests that not only do dogs dream, but they likely dream about waking activities, much like humans do.

We recently received the question Dog barking in sleep. What Should I do? Well, the answer is nothing, because your dog is just dreaming. The first time I saw my puppy bark in his sleep was in the middle of the night and my wife had freaked out. Our puppy started barking, followed by a light growl, and then he started moving his legs around while sleeping. It started to become so common that we just called them dog dreams. Just like humans, dogs have REM sleep cycles and dream on a regular basis.

Often times, youll also see your dog move their legs to mimic running or wag their tail in a sleep dream.

When dogs bark in their sleep, it is because they are dreaming. Research into dog brain waves as they sleep show that dog sleep cycles are very similar to human sleep cycles.

They then enter a light stage of sleep when their heart rate slows and body temperature drops. The body cant do its repair work during this phase of sleep as breathing and heart rate quickens, but this is when we, and our pup, dream.

When we dream, we know that we relive things that have happened to us during the day or work through problems that we were unable to solve. I used to love watching Stetsons tail start wagging when he was in the middle of a dream. As a general rule of thumb, you can expect small dogs to bark a bit more, as they pass between non-REM and REM sleep more quickly, and therefore, have more dreams.

This has probably happened to you, and it can feel you leaving groggy; it can be difficult to return to the sleep state you need to get a good nights rest for the next day. In rare cases, dogs can develop REM Behavior Disorders, where their nightly antics arent limited to just a bit of barking and paw twitching. If things escalate to them chasing inanimate objects around the house only to awake as if nothing had happened, it is time for a trip to the vet.

Veterinary prescribed sleeping pills should only be given to your dog in extreme circumstances, and your vet is unlikely to give you a prescription on the basis of night time barking. You can do things such as place your dogs bed further away from other sleepers in order to minimize the impact of their noise. Barking in their sleep and snoring are two different things, but both of them can cause a lot of noise that can keep the rest of the family up.

Again, dogs tend to snore for the same reasons as humans some kind of obstruction of the airway. But if your dog is constantly making a lot of noise at night, it is a good idea to check that they are actually sleeping. Insomnia is actually pretty rare among dogs and is usually a sign of another issue such as pain, caused by arthritis , or anxiety .

That means that there is plenty of space for naps in their daily schedule, but they should not be sleeping the day away. Just as you can wake up feeling grumpy and groggy if you sleep on a bad mattress, so can your dog. Beds that dont protect their joints from impact can increase their pain, worsen their condition, and prevent sleep.

For dogs that seem stressed or anxious, making sure that they are getting enough Omega-3 fatty acids in their diet is a good first step. You should also up the amount of time you spend with them during the day, both to wear them out for a good nights sleep and to increase their feelings of security and happiness. It is completely normal for dogs to bark in their sleep as part of the REM dream cycle, and in general, it is not something you should worry about.

Definitely avoid the urge to wake them up, as this can severely interfere with their sleep patterns, leaving them disoriented and over tired. If their noise is becoming a nuisance, try moving their bed to another part of the home where they wont disturb anyone. Raven and Linus used to whine in their sleep and Stetson used to wag his tail at night.

Dogs can be very demanding pets, always wanting to be walked, pleading for attention or begging for food. You might expect to get some peace when your dog takes a nap, but thats not always the case! Dogs can bark, whimper, growl or twitch in their sleep. This behavior is totally natural and is generally nothing to worry about, but the reasons behind it are interesting.

Being woken up in the middle of REM sleep can be very shocking and disorienting, which could cause your dog to snap at you, so it is best to leave him alone. Dogs bodies and brains are often very active during the day as they run around and take on board new experiences.

If you find that your dog is in fact not dreaming but lying awake at night calling for you, then make sure his sleeping environment is comfortable and he has access to fresh drinking water.

Introduction

You hear Rover frequently making yipping and yapping sounds at night. Then it progresses into a bark. When you get out of bed to check on him, he’s sound asleep on his side. You go back to bed thinking you were just hearing things. A few nights later, it happens again, but this time when you check on him, he’s lying down in his bed; his ears twitch and paws are moving like he’s running. It might seem peculiar, but it’s actually very normal. If you try to wake your pup, you’re going to interrupt his deep sleep where he is dreaming of chasing squirrels, playing with other dogs, or getting a rewarding belly rub.

The Root of the Behavior

Some sounds you may hear when your four-legged friend is dreaming are barking, growling, whimpering, grunting, howling, or even licking. These sounds are what probably wakes you up at night and seem concerning at first. And then when you check on him, he is actually moving in his sleep. You may also see his body twitch and wiggle, and do things like paw like he is digging or running. Dogs also use all of their senses when dreaming, so you may also see wiggling ears because he is listening, eyelids twitching, or his nose wrinkling. If he is excited or happy, his tail might wag. Dogs can be dreaming about many different things, just like humans. Their dreams could be range from nice, pleasant dreams, to terrifying nightmares. Your pup could dream about getting a treat from you or chasing a squirrel, but he also could dream about a dogfight.All dogs can dream, but does it mean they will always bark? Perhaps not. However, you will probably hear smaller dogs barking at night because they tend to dream frequently during their sleep, approximately every ten minutes. Larger breeds experience a dream every 90 minutes or so, so they might not be as vocal. But, be ready for a bit of barking if you have a puppy or an older dog because they bark more than their middle-aged friends.All of this might sound a little strange, seeing that dogs cannot tell us that they, in fact, are dreaming. But this behavior of barking and moving in their sleep prompted researchers to study a dog’s brain activity during sleep. When a dog sleeps, the brain waves are like a human’s. Just like you, your furry friend falls asleep, enters a deep REM cycle, and starts to dream. However, unlike most of us, he may begin to speak, or bark, while he is dreaming.

Encouraging the Behavior

Barking during sleep is not a bad thing for your dog to do. There is no harm to your dog, and hopefully, he is dreaming more about chasing a cat than he is about being tracked down by other animals. You should not wake him up because you will not only disrupt his sleep cycle, but it could startle him. Of course, as a creature who loves sleep as well, you know how bothersome it is to be woken up in the middle of the night.However, if you have a vocal dog who dreams often, it could become irritating. Before doing anything, make sure your furry friend is indeed asleep when he barks. He might be barking to get your attention because he is hungry, bored, or uncomfortable. If this is the case, make sure he gets enough food, exercise, and that his sleeping arrangement is pleasant for him.If he is barking like he is the host of a daytime talk show, some action might need to be taken. Your pup’s sleep is important, but so is yours. If the barking becomes excessive, move his bed to a room farther from yours. Do not wake him up, though, And if it gets to be too much, take him to the vet.

Dog Barking in Sleep Meaning

Dogs barking is equivalent to humans speaking. Essentially, it a dog’s way of communicating or expressing how they feel at any given moment. When your dog is barking in his sleep it’s simply because all mammals dream. Dog dreams can be entertaining, sad, or happy. Dreams are essentially a recreation of images and experiences that your dog may have experienced. This may cause your dog to bark in their dreams as a form of communication, also known as sleep talking.It’s pretty crazy to think that humans and dogs share the same semi-conscious trance state of dreaming. Often times, you’ll also see your dog move their legs to mimic running or wag their tail in a sleep dream. They may even twitch their eyelids or snore. Sometimes it’s cute and sometimes is extremely annoying.

Dog barking in dream – Understanding REM

Vivid dog dreams will occur the most in a sleep phase called Rapid Eye Movement (REM). In the REM sleep phase, the dog’s brain is most active and many experts say that dogs dream at least 4-6 times per night. It’s also well known that smaller dogs tend to dream more often and bark in their sleep as compared to larger dogs. This is the same effect as in humans as babies can spent 50% of their sleep in a REM cycle.REM sleep typically occurs anywhere from 20-90 minutes after sleeping and typically lasts for a 10-minute period. This means that your dog will dream for around 10-minutes and barking is most common in this sleep state.

Wait! But What If They Are Snoring?

Barking in their sleep and snoring are two different things, but both of them can cause a lot of noise that can keep the rest of the family up.Again, dogs tend to snore for the same reasons as humans – some kind of obstruction of the airway.This could be caused by allergies, respiratory illness, obesity, or just the shape of their snout.Poor Bulldogs are particularly bad snorers because of the shape of their snout. But if the cause is something else, there are a number of things that you can do.Also, unlike the case of sleep barking, snoring is an issue that should be addressed.If it is not just the occasional night of heavy sleep but rather a consistent problem, then they are probably also having problems breathing while they are awake.Dogs use their breathing and, in particular, rapid breathing to regulate their temperature.If they are unable to do that, it can have serious health repercussions. In other words, consistent snoring means that it is time for a trip to the vet.

What If My Dog Can’t Sleep?

But if your dog is constantly making a lot of noise at night, it is a good idea to check that they are actually sleeping. They could just be howling for you for attention or to let you know that they are in some kind of distress.Insomnia is actually pretty rare among dogs and is usually a sign of another issue such as pain, caused by arthritis, or anxiety. Your vet should be able to help you get to the root cause of the insomnia and recommend treatment.First make sure that the reason that they are not sleeping at night isn’t that they are sleeping too much during the day. While the specifics differ from dog to dog, on average, dogs need between 12 and 14 hours of sleep each day.That means that there is plenty of space for naps in their daily schedule, but they should not be sleeping the day away.In terms of general measures that you can take to improve their sleep condition, the first thing to consider is where your dog sleeps.Just as you can wake up feeling grumpy and groggy if you sleep on a bad mattress, so can your dog.Beds that don’t protect their joints from impact can increase their pain, worsen their condition, and prevent sleep.Investing in an orthopedic bed for your dog can be a good first step.For dogs that seem stressed or anxious, making sure that they are getting enough Omega-3 fatty acids in their diet is a good first step.You should also up the amount of time you spend with them during the day, both to wear them out for a good night’s sleep and to increase their feelings of security and happiness.

Wrapping Up

It is completely normal for dogs to bark in their sleep as part of the REM dream cycle, and in general, it is not something you should worry about.Definitely avoid the urge to wake them up, as this can severely interfere with their sleep patterns, leaving them disoriented and over tired.If their noise is becoming a nuisance, try moving their bed to another part of the home where they won’t disturb anyone.However, make sure your dog’s sleep barking is just that. If they are snoring every night, or are up barking all night because they are suffering from insomnia, these are signs of more serious medical conditions that should be dealt with in partnership with your vet.Raven and Linus used to whine in their sleep and Stetson used to wag his tail at night. On rare occasions one of the dogs would bark at night, but luckily for us we didn’t have any recurring sleep barkers.Has your dog been barking in his sleep?Did you do anything to stop your dog’s sleep barking behavior?Tell us what you did with you sleep barker in the comment section below.

Dreaming..

The reason why dogs bark in their sleep is because they have dreams just like humans do. Like people, dogs go through a dream stage of the sleep cycle every time they go to sleep. You can tell when your pet is slipping into that stage by watching their eyes. Dreaming occurs in a stage of sleep known as REM (which stands for rapid eye movement).During this stage, you will notice the dog’s eyelids twitching rapidly as his eyes move beneath them. It is during this stage of sleep that your dog is likely to bark or make other noises such as growling or whimpering.

What do dogs dream about?

However, from what we know about human dreaming, we can guess that dogs’ dreams are related to the activities they take part in during the day.When your dog is barking or growling, it probably means that he or she is reliving a memory of a situation that caused him to bark or growl in real life, or dreaming about a similar situation that could arise. Dreaming is an important way for humans and animals to process their experiences and learn from them.

What if he’s not dreaming?

If you find that your dog is in fact not dreaming but lying awake at night calling for you, then make sure his sleeping environment is comfortable and he has access to fresh drinking water. You can also try giving him more attention and exercise during the day to help him get to sleep more easily.