Why Does My Cat Try to Bury Her Wet Food?

Domestic cats can sometimes act a little strange. Whether thats having a five-minute case of the zoomies or refusing to come out and meet your friend who popped by to say hi, it can be hard to predict what our cats will do next.

In this case, you need to watch out that your cat doesnt bury their food somewhere completely unsuitable, like in a plant pot or under the couch. Image Credit: Pixel-Shot, ShutterstockYour domestic cat might be cute and fluffy on the outside, but on the inside, they retain instincts leftover from their wild ancestors.

Image Credit: Alena Lebedzeva, ShutterstockCovering or burying food helps hide the scent from other cats or predators. If a prey animal sniffs blood or meat, they will be much more likely to avoid the area, meaning theres less chance of a wild cat being able to make another kill. Image Credit: Nils Jacobi, ShutterstockIf your cat doesnt like the new brand of food that youve just switched to, they may decide to dispose of it by trying to bury it.

This is similar to how they bury their waste to keep their living area free from unpleasant scents or smells that might attract a larger predator. Image Credit: mister_Big, ShutterstockIn any of these scenarios, the best solution is to supervise your cat as they eat their food, and then remove their bowl when it seems like theyre finished.

Your cat is weaving around your ankles, meowing and begging for food. You oblige by opening a can of his favorite: ocean whitefish pate, or filet mignon au jus, or whichever flavor he seems to prefer this week, and he does the strangest thing! He acts like the meal you just placed in his bowl (and maybe broke apart with a fork one of yours from the silverware drawer), the one you took a special trip to the overpriced boutique pet shop for, because its his favorite, was something you fished out of the litter pan.

Reverend John George Wood recorded one of the strangest and most persistent food-covering cat stories in 1853 in his book, Illustrated Natural History . It gets weirder: if this dogged little cat couldnt find a piece of paper or handkerchief, she was known to fetch one of her kittens and deposit the poor babe on top of her food dish.

And finally, in the absence of paper, handkerchief, kittens, and carpet she would magicians are cringing everywhere drag the tablecloth from the table, causing, as the reverend recorded in his book, a sad demolition of the superincumbent fragile ware. But researchers can be fairly certain the kill was made by a mountain lion if it is found under brush and scrubs, or if it is covered with leaves, sticks, and grass. Leopards dont cover their food but they do cache in trees high up and out of the reach of neighboring lions and hyenas, which are less adept climbers.

The simplest thing in both cases is to give your cat a chance to eat his meal, but then remove the bowl, and with it, the desire to cache.

I’ve had Sookie for about two months now. Someone found her in the rain, took her in and my boyfriend got her for me. She has her first vet appointment next week but until then, we have no idea how old she is. She’s young though. Not a small kitten but more like a teenager we joke around and say. We don’t have any other pets either. Twice a day, I give her wet food along with her dry food. Lately she’s been trying to bury what food she has left (but only the wet food~she doesn’t do it with the dry food). It would make sense to me if we had another animal but we don’t and I’m so confused why shes acting this way. When she does it, I put the dish up on the counter. Her dishes are glass so when she’s “burying” her food dish, it’s loud & I don’t want her to break her dish. Does anyone have any clue why she’s doing this and is there anything I can do to make her stop? I worry maybe she IS nervous someone or something is going to take her food & I don’t want her scared. Thank you in advance for any help.

Domestic cats aren’t like big wild cats or dogs, they don’t normally come back to a kill, so she likely isn’t trying to save it for later or afraid someone will take it.To help stop the behavior try feeding smaller meals, just what she will eat in one sitting, so there are no leftovers in her bowl.

Cat lovers revel in the silly things felines do. This is true on cat food time as well. Felines happily satisfy themselves and their enjoyment of cat food can top the list of funny cat moments.

Lots of cuddles and good quality cat food will ensure your kitten will soon grow out of pining for its mother. Forget about cat toys, the catnip provides instant and lasting play and a great sense of wellbeing.

1. They’re hiding it for later

Your domestic cat might be cute and fluffy on the outside, but on the inside, they retain instincts leftover from their wild ancestors. So, when your kitty tries to bury or otherwise cover their food, they’re doing something called “caching.”Caching is used by wild cats to protect food from other cats or scavengers, to stop it from spoiling, or to have something to come back later to when there isn’t any other food.Just don’t burst your cat’s bubble and tell them that they’re not a wild mountain lion, after all!

2. They’re trying to conceal the scent

Covering or burying food helps hide the scent from other cats or predators. This is a smart move for wild cats on two fronts. First, hiding the scent means another cat is less likely to discover the food and eat it for themselves. Second, it helps disguise the scent from prey animals, which have sensitive senses of smell. If a prey animal sniffs blood or meat, they will be much more likely to avoid the area, meaning there’s less chance of a wild cat being able to make another kill.

3. They don’t like it!

If your cat doesn’t like the new brand of food that you’ve just switched to, they may decide to dispose of it by trying to bury it. This is similar to how they bury their waste to keep their living area free from unpleasant scents or smells that might attract a larger predator.

The weirdest cat food coverer ever

Reverend John George Wood recorded one of the strangest and most persistent food-covering cat stories in 1853 in his book,It gets weirder: if this dogged little cat couldn’t find a piece of paper or handkerchief, she was known to fetch one of her kittens and deposit the poor babe on top of her food dish. If there were no kittens, she’d shred the carpet and put the ragged bits on top of her food. And finally, in the absence of paper, handkerchief, kittens, and carpet she would – magicians are cringing everywhere – drag the tablecloth from the table, causing, as the reverend recorded in his book, “a sad demolition of the superincumbent fragile ware.”

Felines cover their food, but canines don’t

The Santa Cruz Puma Project collars mountain lions and relies on calls from helpful locals about freshly killed deer to help them track the activity of lions in the area. Sometimes a caller will spot a dead deer that was actually killed by coyotes instead of lions. But researchers can tell immediately if the deer was killed by coyotes or by lions by the condition of the carcass, specifically whether it has been cached or not.Coyotes leave their leftover food out in the open. But researchers can be fairly certain the kill was made by a mountain lion if it is found under brush and scrubs, or if it is covered with leaves, sticks, and grass. “Lions tend not to leave their food out under the open sky…There will be an area around the deer where the raking of the lion’s paws left bare dirt.”[1]

Sometimes caching isn’t really covering

Sometimes caching behavior is more instinctual than practical. One researcher from a different mountain-lion project was tracking a radio-collared cougar. This female had placed a single twig on the carcass of the deer before walking away.[2]Leopards don’t cover their food but they do cache in trees – high up and out of the reach of neighboring lions and hyenas, which are less adept climbers.

Is your cat’s food covering behavior neurotic?

Another good reason to step in is when your cat’s natural behavior turns into a neurotic compulsion. If you have a multi-cat household, for example, and you notice your cat is becoming obsessive in an attempt to hide her food from other felines in the house, it may be time to take action.The simplest thing in both cases is to give your cat a chance to eat his meal, but then remove the bowl, and with it, the desire to cache.