Why Does My Cat Try to Bury Her Food?

Has your cat ever pretended to bury her/his food? Even after eating it? Like they are burying their waste? Lotto usually do that, and I heard many similar stories from the other cat owners. At first, I thought she is doing that because of she didnt like the food; but no, she is sometimes doing it after eating some.

Photo: wikipedia So, in the wild, a wildcat (or since they are almost the same animals, a domestic cat) may attempt to bury or cover any uneaten food in order to avoid attracting any predators to the area. No cats arent scavengers so they dont bury the food to consume later its strictly for protection purposes.

Why does my cat scratch the floor around her food bowl?

Pawing or scratching around the food is a harmless and instinctive behavior. Cats will “fake cover” their food by scratching to hide their traces and stay safe from predators. In some cases, they even use objects like towels to cover their bowl.

What does it mean when cat tries to cover food?

Food covering is called “caching” and wild cats do it. Scientists call this covering behavior “caching” and it’s something wild cats also do. Caching is a way of saving leftovers for later. Hiding the food protects it from scavengers, and might help keep the meat cool and fresh.

Why do cats put their food on the ground?

The behavior is a remnant of living outside and needing to use paws to grab and hold onto prey. Your kitty may simply be incorporating his paws into feeding time as an evolutionary instinct. … Even if there is only one cat in your home, this instinct may still be strong.

Why do cats try to bury?

In the wild, a cat may attempt to bury or cover any uneaten food in order to avoid attracting any predators to the area. … Cats aren’t scavengers so they don’t bury the food to consume later – it’s strictly for protection purposes.

Domestic cats can sometimes act a little strange. Whether thats having a five-minute case of the zoomies or refusing to come out and meet your friend who popped by to say hi, it can be hard to predict what our cats will do next.

In this case, you need to watch out that your cat doesnt bury their food somewhere completely unsuitable, like in a plant pot or under the couch. Image Credit: Pixel-Shot, ShutterstockYour domestic cat might be cute and fluffy on the outside, but on the inside, they retain instincts leftover from their wild ancestors.

Image Credit: Alena Lebedzeva, ShutterstockCovering or burying food helps hide the scent from other cats or predators. If a prey animal sniffs blood or meat, they will be much more likely to avoid the area, meaning theres less chance of a wild cat being able to make another kill. Image Credit: Nils Jacobi, ShutterstockIf your cat doesnt like the new brand of food that youve just switched to, they may decide to dispose of it by trying to bury it.

This is similar to how they bury their waste to keep their living area free from unpleasant scents or smells that might attract a larger predator. Image Credit: mister_Big, ShutterstockIn any of these scenarios, the best solution is to supervise your cat as they eat their food, and then remove their bowl when it seems like theyre finished.

Not all cats do this, but if yours does, the behavior may have been puzzling to you. Its a relatively common behavior and not one you need to worry about.

If you have an indoor cat, youre probably used to the sound of scratching and pawing other the litterbox. But what you may not expect to see is if your cat exhibits this behavior around their food. A cat scratching around their food bowl indicates they are trying to cover it up. It may seem silly seeing them paw incessantly on the flooring when it clearly is not moving any dirt, and their bowl remains blatantly uncovered. Sometimes this cute behavior can become a problem, particularly if they are using their claws. The burying behavior may cause scratches on your precious flooring, or they may splay their leftovers across the kitchen, making a mess. Either way, the key to managing this behavior is knowing the reasons behind it!

For your cat at home, they may see other pets in the household as competition for the hard-earned food that they hunted (by meowing at their humans until kibble rained downwards!) Heat from the sun, which will assist in bacterial growth Scavengers who bring disease Airborne fungal spores that create harmful mold.

Image Credit: Karpova, ShutterstockThe answer may not be due to all the above natural instincts; it simply may be because you have to feed them too much food in one sitting! Image Credit: Nils Jacobi, Shutterstock Your cat attempting to scratch, paw, and bury their food is a 100% normal behavior.

What can you do to prevent it?

You may consider giving your cat food in small portions. Watch the amount your cat typically eats in a meal, and next time, give her/him food in that quantity.Another option is, you can take away your cat’s bowl when s/he finished her/his meal. In fact, cats don’t like it if their food is open for a while because it loses its aroma. Take the food bowl up, clean any spills on the floor and leave fresh water available.

1. They’re hiding it for later

Your domestic cat might be cute and fluffy on the outside, but on the inside, they retain instincts leftover from their wild ancestors. So, when your kitty tries to bury or otherwise cover their food, they’re doing something called “caching.”Caching is used by wild cats to protect food from other cats or scavengers, to stop it from spoiling, or to have something to come back later to when there isn’t any other food.Just don’t burst your cat’s bubble and tell them that they’re not a wild mountain lion, after all!

2. They’re trying to conceal the scent

Covering or burying food helps hide the scent from other cats or predators. This is a smart move for wild cats on two fronts. First, hiding the scent means another cat is less likely to discover the food and eat it for themselves. Second, it helps disguise the scent from prey animals, which have sensitive senses of smell. If a prey animal sniffs blood or meat, they will be much more likely to avoid the area, meaning there’s less chance of a wild cat being able to make another kill.

3. They don’t like it!

If your cat doesn’t like the new brand of food that you’ve just switched to, they may decide to dispose of it by trying to bury it. This is similar to how they bury their waste to keep their living area free from unpleasant scents or smells that might attract a larger predator.

Is Your Cat Sending You a Message?

Many people think that when their cats display this behavior they are saying they dislike the food but this isn’t true. You will see cats performing this covering ritual even with food they have previously eaten and liked.

1. Covering Its Tracks

When we think of wild cats, we usually imagine large predators at the top of the food chain. Surely, they don’t have to worry about being hunted? While this may be true, there are smaller species of wild cats that are prey for other, larger species. These species will have to be careful they don’t attract too much attention to themselves. After a meal, they can leave a lot of scents in the area that will alert predators that they have been there. So, covering up their food will mean they also cover their scent. This behavior may occur more in cats, either pregnant or currently nursing kittens. As in the wild, cats who would usually roam their territories will have limited movement due to their immobile young. Covering up their scent is vital for them to protect their young. Additionally, even cats that apex predators (animals at the top of the food chain) may still cover their tracks, regardless of the threat of predation. More submissive cats will cover their scent so that other aggressive and more dominant cats in the area cannot track them down.

2. They Don’t Like to Share

Many species of wild cats live alone. Even the ones that live together, like lions, like to be somewhat solitary. This anti-social behavior means they aren’t very good sharers! For your cat at home, they may see other pets in the household as competition for the hard-earned food that they hunted (by meowing at their humans until kibble rained downwards!) Once they are finished eating, they may want to cover the food so that other pets don’t come to eat it. You may notice this behavior appear if there are new additions to the household and your cat is not that thrilled about it. This behavior may also be submissive to other pets in the home. A more dominant cat would simply become aggressive to others around their food bowls. Submissive cats will just hide the food so that it doesn’t get eaten by others.

4. They’re Saving It for Later

Any cat owner will know that cats can be high maintenance. If they’re not sleeping, they’re probably cleaning! This cleaning is usually self-grooming, but they also like a clean environment. The drive to cover old food comes from the same instinct to cover their poop in the litter box. The place which your cat eats and spends its time is essentially its “territory” or its “den”. Keeping this space clean is a survival instinct. The presence of old food in their living area will attract other animals, diseases, and mold. It’s in a cat’s best interest to keep their space clean as not to run the risk of becoming sick. Covering their food will keep it away from: