Why Does My Cat Slap Me With His Tail?

If you have ever wondered why your cat likes to hit you with her tail, thats exactly the question we are going to be covering in this short guide. Weve talked with plenty of pet owners and searched the internet to get as many reasonable explanations as we could find, and we are going to share those findings with you here.

Your cats desire to be in the center of the action often makes completing these simple tasks extremely difficult. Photo credit: christels, PixabayA cat seated at your feet, gently hitting you with their tail, is likely showing you a sign of affection not all that different to petting you.

Photo credit: succo, PixabayIf your cat tends to wrap their tail around your legs while you investigate another room, outing, it can mean that they are apprehensive or scared. Many cats will knock items off the shelves , tear up furniture, and can even break litter training and use your bed or favorite chair instead.

Whether you know it or not, cat tails serve a greater purpose than simply looking cute and fluffy. Cats use their tails to communicate and to express their emotions. The only problem is that you wont know what theyre saying if you dont know how to speak cat. If youve always wondered what your cats tail is trying to tell you, and you want to learn what different cat tail positions mean, here are a few helpful tips to help you master cat tail language.

Part of the reason why cats usually land on their feet after falling or jumping is due to the counterbalancing function of their tail, which helps stabilize quick moves and turns, he says. Hence, it is important that pet parents consider the environment and overall cat body language before making assumptions about their kittys emotional state.

When a cat stands tall and holds her tail high, it usually means she is confident and happy, explains Rueb. In some cases, when a cat becomes nervous, she will puff her tail out, theoretically to look bigger to the perceived threat, Rueb says. A cat will attack if she feels she has no other choice to alleviate the fear or perceived danger in the present environment, warns Hartstein.

Pet parents will usually be able to tell something is bothering their feline by paying attention to the other cat body language accompanying her wagging tail. Building a good relationship with your feline friend can be tricky, as we are different species and have different preferences when it comes to socialization, contact and communication. Having recently moved from rainy Oregon to the sunshine state, Anastasiya Chevtchenko spends her time catching rays by the beach, playing soccer with the locals, and embracing pet heaven Chewy.

A recent Penn graduate, Anastasiya works in Marketing where she hopes to bring in her expertise in international relations to expand the business.

Why Do Cats Slap Their Tails? A lashing or wagging tail for cats never means happinessrather, it is a very clear warning sign that something is making the cat upset, stressed, nervous, and that she could become aggressive if whatever is bothering her does not stop, Hartstein says.

Cats twitch the end of their tails when they are hunting and playing, as well as when they are mildly irritated and frustrated. Cats twitch the end of their tails when they are hunting and playing, as well as when they are mildly irritated and frustrated.

By paying attention to the direction and speed of your cats wagging tail, as well as the rest of their body, you can usually get a good grasp as to how theyre feeling. The Quick Flick While a loosely wagging tail can be a sign of focus or playfulness, a rapidly whipping tail that is lashing from side to side more forcefully is a clear indicator that your feline friend is feeling fearful or aggressive. The tail-up posture tail straight up with a slight curve at the end is a signal that the cat is approaching amicably, Ballantyne continues.

The Quick Flick While a loosely wagging tail can be a sign of focus or playfulness, a rapidly whipping tail that is lashing from side to side more forcefully is a clear indicator that your feline friend is feeling fearful or aggressive. (Related: Do Animals Dream?) A whipping tale on an alert cat can mean nervousness, potential aggression, and Do not touch! says Siracusa. Cats are frisky and social creatures and can express and communicate complex moods with their tails.

A tail carried all the way down may mean that a cat is feeling defensive and aggressive behavior might follow. A tail tucked all the way down and curled beneath the cats body signals fear or submission.

Its hard to believe, but my cat hits me in the face with his tail. Im sure that Panda Bear doesnt mean to hurt me, but its painful when it hits my eyes. If I dont have them closed, its extremely uncomfortable. He slaps me pretty hard too! He could use that thing as a weapon!

Simply push his derriere aside and hell still be able to hit you with his powerful appendage.

1. Showing Interest

Cats are known for being curious, and their need for investigating often puts them in the way. You have probably experienced this first-hand many times as you try to put away groceries from the supermarket or fold clothes. Your cat’s desire to be in the center of the action often makes completing these simple tasks extremely difficult.If you tend to shoo away your pet while you are trying to complete these tasks, your cat may be trying to signal to you that they are extra interested in what you are doing. They don’t want you to shoo them away when they gently tap or wrap their tail around your leg.

2. She loves you

Cats have a strange way of showing affection compared to many other animals, especially dogs. They can only usually tolerate petting for a short time, and they are generally not big cuddlers and snugglers. If they like you, they tend to sit by you and follow you around the house but will stay just out of reach.A cat seated at your feet, gently hitting you with their tail, is likely showing you a sign of affection not all that different to petting you. It can be a sign of deep love if your cat is trying to find a way of mimicking your affectionate behavior.

3. Scared

If your cat tends to wrap their tail around your legs while you investigate another room, outing, it can mean that they are apprehensive or scared. In this case, the tail wrapping is like holding hands. Your cat is nervous and wants to hold on to you while you investigate. It doesn’t want you to pick it up because they may need to get away quickly, but they want to go with you, so they wrap their tail around you for safety. Of course, you might be going into the other room for a pencil, or to answer the phone, so the behavior seems strange to you.

4. Angry

Your cat has limited ways of showing affection and limited ways of showing anger as well. They find ways to communicate, and one of the ways they show their dissatisfaction is by being annoying. Many cats will knock items off the shelves, tear up furniture, and can even break litter training and use your bed or favorite chair instead. It’s also not uncommon for your cat to wait until you are sleeping to take to hit you in the face with their tail. They can also hit you with their tail while you are watching TV.The best way to prevent this type of behavior is to get to find out what the cat is mad about and correct it. If it was a one-time incident, you will need to wait a few days for it to pass over. In some cases, you may be able to use a to help disperse some anger.

6. She wants attention

It’s certainly difficult to ignore a cat that is continuously hitting you with their tail. We can only assume that your pet is fully aware of this and is trying to get your attention, especially if it has worked in the past. Your pet is likely trying to communicate something with you. Most likely, it wants you to supply pets or a treat.If the tail hitting is becoming annoying and you have narrowed it down to a call for treats, you can try using a cat toy to provide entertainment and slowly dispense treats.

Understanding Cat Tail Language

Whether you know it or not, cat tails serve a greater purpose than simply looking cute and fluffy. Cats use their tails to communicate and to express their emotions. The only problem is that you won’t know what they’re saying if you don’t know how to speak cat. If you’ve always wondered what your cat’s tail is trying to tell you, and you want to learn what different cat tail positions mean, here are a few helpful tips to help you master cat tail language.

Why Do Cats Move Their Tails?

Like all sentient beings, cats use both verbal and nonverbal communication to express their emotions and moods. One of the biggest nonverbal communication tools for cats is their tail. Russell Hartstein, certified dog/cat behaviorist and trainer and CEO (Canine Executive Officer) of Fun Paw Care in Los Angeles, notes that “Cat tails are incredibly expressive, and when taken in context to their immediate environment and the rest of their body language, reveal a lot about what is going on emotionally and internally with your cat.”According to Hartstein, aside from trying to communicate, cats also move their tails to stay balanced.“Part of the reason why cats usually land on their feet after falling or jumping is due to the counterbalancing function of their tail, which helps stabilize quick moves and turns,” he says.

What Do Different Cat Tail Signs Mean?

By looking at cat tail signs, we can deduce a lot about a cat’s mood. Michael Rueb, operations manager for the National Cat Protection Society in Spring Valley, California, notes that “even though there are certain basics that pet parents can bet on when interpreting cat tail language, being mindful of the cat’s whole body will give you the clearer picture about what emotions your cat is experiencing.”Pet experts point out a few specific cat tail signs for pet parents to take note of:

Tail Wrapping

When your kitty wraps her tail around you or others, she is showing affection, relaxation and love. This usually means she is open to being petted and receiving human contact. However, there are other times when your feline may wrap her tail and but is not interested in interacting with others.“Sometimes your kitty will wrap her tail when she is solo, asleep or sitting,” Hartstein says. “Although typically relaxed in this position, this cat tail language may indicate your cat is not interested in interaction or wants to be left alone.”Hence, it is important that pet parents consider the environment and overall cat body language before making assumptions about their kitty’s emotional state.

Loose Tail vs. Tucked Tail

A loose, horizontal tail implies a relaxed cat and neutral state of emotion, but as soon as the tail appears to be lower or tucked, this may paint a completely different picture, explains Hartstein. If your cat’s tail is held low, this typically means that she is feeling fearful or nervous, “especially if her tail is tucked underneath her body,” explains Rueb.Both Hartstein and Rueb urge pet parents to be cautious of lowered cat tails, as these usually mean that the cat is in a state of fear, retreat, aggression or hostility.

Upright Tail

When a cat stands tall and holds her tail high, “it usually means she is confident and happy,” explains Rueb. Walking with an upright tail is an indication that your cat is comfortable, sociable and looking to engage with others around her.Hartstein adds that an upright cat tail position is a sign of an affable cat looking to connect or commune.“If she gives you a little flick in the upright portion of the tail, consider it an invitation to share some love,” he says.

Arched/Puffed Tail

If your cat is arching or puffing out her tail, steer clear of her path! Pet experts Hartstein and Rueb note that these cat tail signs indicate your cat is not happy, perhaps because she is feeling threatened, which may result in aggressive behavior.“In some cases, when a cat becomes nervous, she will puff her tail out, theoretically to look bigger to the perceived threat,” Rueb says.If you notice this behavior in your feline, avoid triggering her. “A cat will attack if she feels she has no other choice to alleviate the fear or perceived danger in the present environment,” warns Hartstein.

Wagging Tail

We often associate a dog’s wagging tail with happy emotions and excitement, but what does it mean in cat language?“A lashing or wagging tail for cats never means happiness—rather, it is a very clear warning sign that something is making the cat upset, stressed, nervous, and that she could become aggressive if whatever is bothering her does not stop,” Hartstein says.Rueb adds, “At The National Cat Protection Society, we often have to tell people that when they are petting a cat and their tail starts slapping the ground back and forth, that it may be time to stop, as the cat has probably had enough and may be feeling overstimulated.”Pet parents will usually be able to tell something is bothering their feline by paying attention to the other cat body language accompanying her wagging tail.

What does cat flicking tail mean?

Cats twitch the end of their tails when they are hunting and playing, as well as when they are mildly irritated and frustrated. In this case, read the scene and look for other clues to their mood. If they’re not playing or stalking something, then the twitching tail movement probably means that they are annoyed.

What do Cat tail signs mean?

“A flicking or lashing tail signals that the cat is agitated, while a slowly waving tail indicates the cat is focused on something (i.e., about to pounce on a toy). “The tail-up posture — tail straight up with a slight curve at the end — is a signal that the cat is approaching amicably,” Ballantyne continues.

What does a cat’s tail movements mean?

“Tails can move quickly or slowly,” she says. “A flicking or lashing tail signals that the cat is agitated, while a slowly waving tail indicates the cat is focused on something (i.e., about to pounce on a toy). “Cats tuck their tails under or next to their body when they are feeling frightened.

What your cat’s tail is telling you?

Many of the cat’s tail down positions signal defensiveness or submission. A tail carried all the way down may mean that a cat is feeling defensive and aggressive behavior might follow. A tail tucked all the way down and curled beneath the cat’s body signals fear or submission.

Why do cats thump their tails?

A moving tail in cats generally indicates arousal of some sort — excitement, fear, aggression — but your dog may mistake the tail-wagging cat as an invitation to approach. If this tail warning to back off is ignored, the tail escalates to lashing or thumping — and ultimately an attack.

Do cats communicate with their tails?

A familiar phrase claims that the eyes are the windows to the soul, but in cats, it’s their tail position that provides the greatest insight into what a cat is feeling. Cats use their tail movements, along with their eyes, ears, and body postures, to communicate.

The Kitty Needs a Rear End Alignment

Like I said, I don’t think that cats mean to hit people in the face. It’s not like they plan to do it. They slap their tails back and forth when they’re annoyed. When does it happen to you? Are you usually in bed, and does it happen after moving the