Why Does My Cat Shed So Much?

The truth about cat shedding is that this is a normal, natural process in a cats life. Humans have periods of hair growth and shedding too. Shedding is how animals replenish their fur and keep it in good condition.

The number of hours a cat is exposed to
sunlight in a day (photoperiod) triggers the shedding process. You will not see much if any
shedding of your outdoor cat during the winter months, because
they naturally will hold on to all their fur to use as thermal
protection from the cold conditions.

Daily brushing and combing removes loose and dead hair
and helps keep a cats skin and coat healthy. Whether purebred or mixed breed, a key to good brushing lies in
the length of a cats coat. A cat with a very short, single coat
similar to the Siamese, Burmese and Cornish Rex needs very little
brushing.

How do I get my cat to stop shedding so much?

Brush your cat regularly. This is the most effective way to reduce your cat shedding hair, as it helps to collect the fur before it falls out. ….Bath your cat once a month. We hear you – no cat is going to enjoy that. ….Change their diet. ….Keep them hydrated. ….Give them a place to call home.

Is it normal for indoor cats to shed a lot?

The good news is that shedding is a normal characteristic of cats. Excessive shedding, or an increase in shedding, can help clue you in to potential medical problems, so it’s important to know what to keep an eye out for.

Tired of finding cat hair all over your house? Well, while there’s not a way to prevent your cat from shedding, consistent grooming and dietary changes can help cut down on the time you spend sweeping up hair.

Felines who live indoors, especially when they’re in homes with both heat and air-conditioning, can be in a constant state of shedding because their biological system becomes confused by temperature controls. This comb will remove the dead coat and catch all the tangles and mats that lie hidden underneath without irritating your cat‘s delicate skin.

If your cat suddenly begins shedding a lot, it could be an indication of a health problem and necessitate a trip to the vet, . The ASPCA says a variety of factors can cause cat‘s hair loss, including allergies, ringworm, fleas, a poor diet, stress, pregnancy, or sunburn. Writing on PetMD , Jennifer Coates, DVM, says cat owners can engineer a diet that could reduce shedding that’s not caused by some other underlying health problem.

Whether it collects in the corners, gets all over your clothes, or shows up in an elongated regurgitated ball, cat hair just comes with the territory of feline cohabitation. A gleaming coat is one of their finer physical attributes, but lets face it, cats shed. Loose, dead hair is set free 1-2 times a year, usually becoming airborne at some point only to settle in places youd least expect it.

Its a perfectionist strategy, and one that originally helped them stay off the radar of vicious predators. Equally important, this mutually beneficial activity reduces the frequency of hairballs.

We can address any possible issues related to their skin or coat, trim nails, and give them stylish cuts. Depending on breed and environment (among other factors), cats normally lose and regrow their millions of hairs on a routine basis. Not all cats shed a heavy winter undercoat during the spring, or lose dry hairs in the fall to make room for a heavier winter coat.

Regular brushing can help reduce the amount of fur your cat sheds. They might not immediately thank you for this, but bathing them can also help the coat and skin during a heavier shed. Likewise, adding certain ingredients or supplements to your pets diet can add luster and shine to a drab or dry coat.

Its true that cats shed as a normal process, but too much hair loss can be indicative of larger issues, such as: External parasites, such as fleas Stress or anxiety Allergies Skin inflammation or irritation Ringworm We recommend making notes about your cats fur quality, texture, appearance, and how their skin feels.

In general, if your cats coat is shiny, thick, clean or debris, tangles or mats, and doesnt have a dry or brittle appearance, their health is likely in great shape. Even if you notice more hair being dropped on your clothing or furniture, it could be that they are simply undergoing a routine shed.

It may be no surprise to see your cat happily grooming themselves. In fact, cats and kittens of all breeds enjoy this activity. While you may not think twice about your cat self-grooming, you may start to notice more cat fur in your home. Your pet may shed, but at what point should it be a concern? You may even find yourself asking, Why is my cat shedding so much? For this reason, we sat down with Trupanion veterinarian Dr. Sarah Nold to learn more about cat shedding and grooming tips to help your furry friend in the future.

Although seasons and temperature changes may play a role, it may mean something more is going on with your furry friend. If you have any concerns, talk to your veterinarian and they can determine the next best step for your best friend.

Naturally, your cats breed may determine what type of fur they have like long-hair, medium-hair, short-hair, and hairless. Also, a hairless cat breed like a Sphynx will probably have less shedding. While your cat may have long fur , that doesnt necessarily mean theyll have a shedding problem.

If you notice your cat exhibiting any of these signs, please seek the medical care of your veterinarian. They can determine if additional medical tests are needed for your best friend. But if your cat overly grooms, they may start to develop hairballs.

Nold further explains the connection between cat shedding and hairballs. Shedding can also be a concern if your cat ingests large amounts of hair while self-grooming, as it can lead to the formation of hairballs. These hairballs can be large enough that they can block the GI tract and have to be surgically removed.

If your cat has a tendency to form hairballs, talk to your veterinarian.

Tips to Help with Shedding Cats

Some useful information to help you manage the fur.The truth about cat shedding is that this is a normal, natural process in a cat’s life. Humans have periods of hair growth and shedding too. Shedding is how animals replenish their fur and keep it in good condition.Cats in the wild generally shed their coats twice yearly; in the spring to lose the heavy winter undercoat and in the fall in preparation for the “grow-in” of the next winters’ undercoat. However, since we have domesticated cats and subjected them to air-conditioning in summer and artificial heat in winter, their systems have become confused enough to put them into a constant shedding state. This is normal.Cats shed in order to remove dead fur from their bodies. Dead fur can cause skin irritation so it needs to be removed. If the dead fur is not removed via combing and grooming, the cat’s body will remove it by shedding it.Shedding is considered a sign of health in a cat, because sick cats do not shed their fur. Shedding occurs for different reasons, but depends largely on the amount of time your cat spends outdoors or whether your cat is purely an indoor cat. The shedding is largely influenced by daylight, and this is called the “photoperiod”. The number of hours a cat is exposed to sunlight in a day (photoperiod) triggers the shedding process. In addition, shedding varies considerably among the different breeds. Indoor cats shed at any time of the year and the amount of shedding hair is less than outdoor cats due to the artificial light inside the house, and from the controlled temperature in your home.Outdoor cats shed in the spring when the days start to lengthen and they spend more time outside. You will not see much if any shedding of your outdoor cat during the winter months, because they naturally will hold on to all their fur to use as thermal protection from the cold conditions.There are two breeds whose shedding is minimal – the Cornish Rex, which has short, curly fur that lies close to the body, and the Devon Rex which has similar coat of thin curly fur across its body. Because of their very short and fine fur, the shedding from these two breeds is barely noticeable. There is one breed that does not shed and that is the purebred hairless Sphynx. This cat is not completely hairless because it has a fine down all over its body. This breed is rare and it needs a special kind of care, but is a good choice for people with allergies.Shedding in cats can be controlled with frequent brushing and combing. Daily brushing and combing removes loose and dead hair and helps keep a cat’s skin and coat healthy. Cats with healthy fur coats who are groomed regularly do tend to shed a bit less.

Choosing the Right Grooming Tools

When it comes to de-shedding tools for cats, the National Cat Groomers Institute recommends a 6- to 8-inch-long metal comb with fine to medium teeth. This comb will remove the dead coat and catch all the tangles and mats that lie hidden underneath without irritating your cat‘s delicate skin. A rubber curry cat shedding brush is also great for lifting loose hair. And, like dogs, most felines enjoy the massage the brush offers.”We don’t recommend using a metal de-shedding tool or rake,” Paolillo says. “They can damage hair, which makes mats form faster. They can also damage delicate skin.”Marty Becker, DVM, recommends using a grooming glove for shorthaired cats. The grooming will attract “a large amount” of hair that would otherwise be shed, he writes.It’s a myth that longhaired cats shed more than their shorthaired relatives, Becker says. You just see more of their hair on your floor and furniture. You’ll see less of it, however, if you brush or comb your cat, no matter its hair length, daily, he says.

When Shedding Isn’t Normal

If your cat suddenly begins shedding a lot, it could be an indication of a health problem and necessitate a trip to the vet, the American Society for the Protection of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) says.The ASPCA says a variety of factors can cause cat‘s hair loss, including allergies, ringworm, fleas, a poor diet, stress, pregnancy, or sunburn. If your cat is shedding fur in clumps or scratches or bites it skin, you definitely need to go see the vet.If the vet decides there’s no underlying cause to your cat‘s frequent shedding, there are still some things you can do. Feed her a healthy diet and keep a close eye on on her skin and coat while grooming, the ASPCA writes. That way you can spot any irritation or fleas, ticks, or other parasites.Be sure to keep up with the regular grooming, too. That will prevent your cat‘s hair from matting, which can hurt and cause skin problems.

Feel Good, Look Great

Cats spend inordinate amounts of time tidying themselves. When they aren’t eating, sleeping or playing, cats are typically self-grooming or cleaning up fellow felines. It’s a perfectionist strategy, and one that originally helped them stay off the radar of vicious predators.Something that cat owners learn pretty early on is that brushing out their cat’s fur coat on a regular basis helps keep things cleaner around the house. Equally important, this mutually beneficial activity reduces the frequency of hairballs.Did you know that we offer cat grooming services? We can address any possible issues related to their skin or coat, trim nails, and give them stylish cuts. Our feline friends always leave happy and looking fine!

Cats Shed All the Time!

Cats shed every day, but will only go through large-scale sheds once or twice a year. Depending on breed and environment (among other factors), cats normally lose and regrow their millions of hairs on a routine basis.Not all cats shed a heavy winter undercoat during the spring, or lose dry hairs in the fall to make room for a heavier winter coat. Indoor-only cats may have a steady shed year-round. Each cat has a unique shedding pattern.

Save Your Sanity

Regular brushing can help reduce the amount of fur your cat sheds. They might not immediately thank you for this, but bathing them can also help the coat and skin during a heavier shed. Likewise, adding certain ingredients or supplements to your pet’s diet can add luster and shine to a drab or dry coat.

Your Cat’s Coat

It’s true that cats shed as a normal process, but too much hair loss can be indicative of larger issues, such as:We recommend making notes about your cat’s fur quality, texture, appearance, and how their skin feels. If you see bald spots or hotspots, it’s time to get to the bottom of these symptoms. Also, if you notice that your cat is experiencing more hairballs than normal, please let us know.

Why is my cat shedding so much?

Dogs and cats shed. But, you may not always think of your cat as the reason for the pet hair found around the house.Also, “the most common cause of shedding is normal seasonal shedding, which usually occurs in the spring and fall with changes in temperature,” says Nold.Although seasons and temperature changes may play a role, it may mean something more is going on with your furry friend.If you have any concerns, talk to your veterinarian and they can determine the next best step for your best friend.

Are certain breeds more prone to shedding?

If you’ve recently brought home a cat, you may wonder about your cat’s fur and skin. Naturally, your cat’s breed may determine what type of fur they have like long-hair, medium-hair, short-hair, and hairless. Nold points out what else to consider when it comes to your cat’s fur.“No certain cat breed is more prone to shedding, but shedding may be more noticeable in a medium or long-haired cat. Also, a hairless cat breed like a Sphynx will probably have less shedding.”While your cat may have long fur, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll have a shedding problem. Every cat is different and they react differently to changes in season, temperature, environment, or even allergies.To learn more about your cat’s fur and skin, check out this cat grooming guide from VCA Animal Hospital.

Cat grooming

Your cat may shed based on a seasonal change, but when does it become something more? For example, “shedding can become a concern if you notice areas of hair thinning or hair loss, like Alopecia,” inserts Nold.Also, your pet may not always let you know something is bothering them. In fact, there may be an underlying medical condition for hair loss.Nold breaks down what to look for when it comes to your furry family member.
If you notice your cat exhibiting any of these signs, please seek the medical care of your veterinarian. They can determine if additional medical tests are needed for your best friend.