Why Does My Cat Lick the Wall?

Did I accidentally pour a bowl of chicken soup on my gallery wall? Is the paint on the wall tasty? Why does the aroma of the wall attract four-legged animals? Do you want to know why your cat is licking the wall?

However, the main reason cats lick walls is because of stress, boredom, imbalanced diet, taste, and moisture. You probably know that cats are playful animals who love to spend time with humans or other pets and have a great attraction towards toys.

If they fail to find good company, they will get bored which may lead to strange feline activities include wall licking. If you dont feed your cat a healthy, balanced diet, they might develop pica and in the end, start to lick walls.

How do you treat pica in cats?

Remove targeted items . The easiest solution may be simply to hide the clothes, plants, or other items your cat loves to chew on..Give your cat something else to chew. ….Play with your cat. ….Make appealing items unappealing. ….Get rid of dangerous plants. ….Talk to an animal behaviorist.

Why is my cat licking random surfaces?

Cats who lick plastic and other non-food things may have a disorder known as pica. Pica can be the result of a health condition, dietary deficiency, compulsive disorder, lack of mental stimulation, or a stressful change in routine. You should talk with your veterinarian if you suspect your cat has pica.

Why is my cat licking the concrete wall?

So, why do cats lick concrete? In many cases, concrete or cement licking is related to pica resulting from anemia, a lack of calcium, or other nutritional deficiency. In other cases, cats may just lick the concrete because they like the texture, temperature, or even the taste of the concrete.

Why is my cat licking everything all of a sudden?

Excessive licking can be a sign of parasites, neurologic disease, food allergies and endocrine disease, and can lead to skin irritation, infections and even hairballs,” she advises. To redirect your feline friend’s attention onto something other than licking at himself or other objects excessively, Dr.

Cats licking themselves (and occasionally each other) is normal. Its a little less normal, but not uncommon, for cats to lick other things as well. They may lick the furniture, the woodwork, the floors and the walls. One of my foster cats was obsessed with licking the flock wallpaper in the living room, while another seemed to prefer the plaster in the hall; he stopped once we repainted it.

Some of the wall coverings we humans apply to our homes are very interesting for a cat: smooth glosses, nubby wood-chip or soft flock wallpapers, tactile textured paint. If textiles feature heavily in her licking behaviour and she also sucks on wool and other materials, the issue may also be that she was removed from her mother at too early an age.

Its a sad fact that all too many of our feline companions deal with chronic dehydration because theyre not comfortable with conventional water dishes. Most cats engage in this at one time or another, whether its the mischievous kitty who chews up the kitchen roll or the anxious feline who self-soothes by sucking the candlewick off your bedspread. You can try to break her of her bad habit by using bitter-tasting pet deterrent sprays on the walls where she usually licks, but this will tend to move the problem elsewhere.

Many cat owners are accustomed to cats licking themselves, but not so much the walls. The reason for this unusual habit is likely a medical or behavioral issue, and the best way to determine which is with a trip to the vet.

Reasons Why Cats Lick the Walls

Anxiety and stress can lead to compulsive behaviors in felines. If you notice your cat licking walls and you fail to prevent them, then stress is the reason behind it. It is very hard to divert the attention of cats, especially with compulsive behaviors. Even if you have her favorite toy or yummy treats in hand, they will continue the job. However, if you manage to distract her from the wall licking task, then the behavior might not be compulsive.Cats can become sad or depressed due to many reasons. Separation from a partner, new home, or unsettling environments can urge the wall licking habit. They are animals and they just don’t know how to cope with stress and it sometimes results in licking house walls. Cats can also become stressed if you introduce a new pet in the home, or if there are a lot of animals outside.You probably know that cats are playful animals who love to spend time with humans or other pets and have a great attraction towards toys. If they fail to find good company, they will get bored which may lead to strange feline activities include wall licking. They just want to spend their time or release their energy and your living room wall serves the purpose. So, boredom might be the reason why your cat licks the wall. This can also be the reason why your cat bites your ears.To help prevent boredom in your cat, you should try to spend more time with them.Pica is a health condition normally seen in cats that cause them to lick or eat nonfood items, and the wall is one of them. If your kitty loves eating things that are not suitable for them, she might be experiencing Pica. Want to know what exactly causes this behavior?The deficiency of nutrients such as iron, fats, or fiber can cause pica. Cats balance their nutritional deficiencies by eating unwanted items or licking things that aren’t meant to be licked. This behavior is commonly seen in wild or feline cats.As a pet owner, adjust the diet according to your cat’s age or health. For example, a pregnant feline, or a young kitten, requires different meals than normal cats. If you don’t feed your cat a healthy, balanced diet, they might develop pica and in the end, start to lick walls.Did you know unlike human beings, cats have different tastes? We are drawn towards food items but you never know what your furry friend loves to eat – and sometimes the taste of the wall can entice them. This is the same reason why cats love olives.It can be the taste of the paint you have applied on the walls or the texture that attracts your cat. Air fresheners or tasty gases can also stick to the walls, and sometimes cleaning products can get in touch with walls giving them a unique taste that is liked by cats. Since cats love to experiment with their diet, licking walls is not an unusual thing in such homes.If you notice the cat licking on a specific wall, you might want to prevent your cat’s access from it.If you reside in a humid area where the air has too much moisture – your walls can easily absorb the vapors and become damp. Surprisingly, cats are tempted towards moisture as it has a great taste. Some cats that are deprived of water. Therefore, when they lick the wall, they can fulfill their H2O needs from the damp walls. However, it is very rare.

Why is my cat licking the walls?

The most obvious reason is that something was spilled on the wall recently: food, drink or some other substance that a cat might be attracted to. Even after you’ve cleaned up, there may be traces of the tempting substance remaining in the paintwork or wallpaper. If the cat keeps licking everything or if the cat’s interest is restricted to a particular spot, simply cleaning that area more thoroughly may get her to stop licking the wall.If this is not the case, you will have to look for other causes. Your cat may like something about the way the wall tastes or smells. It’s not unknown for cats to take an interest in paints, varnishes and adhesives because they contain compounds that are tasty or smell good to a cat. These compounds might have no odour at all for a human but could smell just wonderful for your feline friend. Some wall-coverings are made out of plastic substances, too. Cats are often interested in plastics for a similar reason: they like the flavour or the fragrance.It’s also worth noting that some of the volatile compounds in your paint or wall-coverings might be interesting for your cat because they produce a psychoactive effect. Cats are very sensitive to the effects of certain chemicals, even at low concentrations. It’s actually fairly common for to cat keep licking everything in a sort of low-key kitty solvent abuse. This is why cats will sometimes want to stick their heads into plastic bags or lick and chew them: they’re getting a pleasant, intoxicating sensation from the fumes that the plastic gives off. While this won’t hurt them in small doses, it is clearly not something you want your cat to do over the long term.

Textures

Cats may lick walls and other surfaces not for the taste but for the texture. Some of the wall coverings we humans apply to our homes are very interesting for a cat: smooth glosses, nubby wood-chip or soft flock wallpapers, tactile textured paint. A cat who is under-stimulated may seek out the sensations produced when they run their tongues over the surface.Of course, you can’t just ask a cat “do you lick walls just because you like the texture?” but you can look for supporting evidence that this is what’s driving the habit. One sure sign that it’s a tactile issue is that the cat enjoys licking other surfaces with a similar texture. A cat who licks flock wallpaper and also licks suede or velvet clothing is probably engaging in this behaviour because she really enjoys that feeling.If your cat is pursuing a specific texture, the motivation behind her wall-licking habit is probably boredom. She isn’t getting enough stimulation from her environment and lifestyle so she’s seeking it elsewhere. If textiles feature heavily in her licking behaviour and she also sucks on wool and other materials, the issue may also be that she was removed from her mother at too early an age.

Condensation and moisture

If the wall that your cat is licking is one that tends to get damp, your cat may be seeking out moisture. This might seem unlikely since you probably provide at least one bowl full of clean, fresh water at all times. It’s a fact of kitty psychology, however, that they can’t always drink out of the bowl. Cats with visual issues such as cataracts or nystagmus often have this problem. Some cats prefer that their water bowl not be too close to their food dish. Others just struggle with standing water of any type.A sign that your cat is licking the walls for the moisture is that she deliberately splashes water out of her bowl onto the floor before drinking it, insists on moving the bowl to a different location, or refuses the bowl altogether and demands that you turn on the tap. A cat who isn’t getting enough water may become constipated or develop a UTI; if your cat tends to suffer from these ailments, her wall-licking may be an attempt to get the moisture she needs.You can address this in a number of ways. Run the tap for her now and again when the sink is empty, so she can drink from it. Wash up her dish every time you refill it with fresh water. Ensure that she has a dish of clean water in every room where she likes to hang out. Changing a deep bowl for a wider, shallower one so that she can see that the water is clean more easily. I am a big fan of providing a kitty drinking fountain — these provide clean, flowing water, which is more tempting and easier for cats to drink. It’s a sad fact that all too many of our feline companions deal with chronic dehydration because they’re not comfortable with conventional water dishes. A drinking fountain can really help.

Licking the wall: pica

Pica is the name given to the regular consumption of non-food items. Most cats engage in this at one time or another, whether it’s the mischievous kitty who chews up the kitchen roll or the anxious feline who self-soothes by sucking the candlewick off your bedspread. Sometimes the consumption of non-food items is a brief episode and stops on its own. In other cases, though, you may have a cat with a long-term compulsion to eat things they really shouldn’t. I suppose my favourite example of kitty pica was a tuxedo kitty I knew who could not stop eating the handles from plastic shopping bags. They made her sick every time but she couldn’t seem to stop herself from chewing them off and swallowing them. If you’ve lived with more than one or two cats, you probably have a similar anecdote.Long-term pica has a number of possible causes. Sometimes the cat just likes the flavour or texture of the substance they’re eating. In other cases, though, there can be a more serious underlying problem such as a nutritional deficiency or a condition such as anaemia. If your cat is attempting to consume other non-food substances as well as licking the wall, this could be a sign that she is dealing with just such a problem. To start with you might want to try changing her food. The majority of commercial cat food is nutritionally complete but if you normally feed her a cheap brand she might not be getting everything she needs. Look for a quality grain-free cat food with high protein content. Remember that a cat’s nutritional needs may change as she gets older or if she falls pregnant, and consider adjusting her diet accordingly. If the problem persists even when you’ve done this, make sure you have your vet check her for any medical issues that might be causing pica.