Why Does My Cat Keep Moving Her Kittens?

Owners are often curious as to why their cats constantly scratch at windows. The irritating sound generated grates on the nerves. Of course, some cats are more prone to this behavior

Check that theyve been left somewhere warm and arent being subjected to excessive light or noise. Some of the habits of a new mother may seem baffling, especially the so-called 2 week move. Rest assured, this behavior is entirely normal in cats and rarely a cause for concern.

Its worth noting the timeframe as most cats wont move their kittens for their first 14 days of life. Why does my female cat keep moving her kittens? is a question often asked by owners. Your cat is unlikely to welcome the prospect of feeding her young in full view of her human family.

As per Biology of Reproduction , it takes a queen at least 6 weeks to enter heat again after giving birth. All cats dislike bright illumination, seeing better in dim surroundings, but kittens are particularly susceptible. If the cats are close to loud neighbors or windows that leak a lot of sound from the street, it may distress the kittens.

If their territory is dusty, grimy, or dirty, they will beat a hasty retreat and set up home elsewhere. Kittens need to run a warmer body temperature than adult cats. The conventional predators of adult cats, such as coyotes , will make short work of a kitten.

Other cats in the home, including the kittens father, may react poorly to new animals stealing attention. On the one hand, the cat wants to put a safe distance between their birthing site and any potential predators. In her quest for somewhere warm and quiet, the kittens may end up in a washing machine or somewhere equally unsafe.

A cat can only feed so many kittens, and greater emphasis is placed on those likeliest to survive. You may find yourself asking, why does my cat keep moving her kittens to my bed? after seeing a mewling litter on your pillow. This condition makes it painful for the queen to express milk and difficult for her kittens to feed.

As explained by Developmental Psychobiology , mother cats use their voice to create recognition in their babies. Your cat may be simply teaching her young how to find her if they grow separated in the future. Knowing what to do when your cat keeps moving her kittens is a crucial part of raising a litter.

If the ambient temperature around your cat and kitten nest drops below 80 degrees regularly, watch to see if this coincides with moving.

How do I stop my cat from moving her kittens?

Keep the area clean and as odor-free as possible..Ensure the area is dim, quiet, and relaxing..Keep other pets away from the area..Give the new family plenty of privacy..Monitor Mom and her kittens from a distance, when possible.

Why does my cat keep wanting to move her kittens?

Cats will instinctively want to keep their kittens somewhere clean. That’s because strong scents can attract predators in the wild, and that will put the lives of her kittens in danger. If the nest is becoming dirty, then she might start trying to move her kittens to a cleaner spot.

Why does my cat keep moving her 4 week old kittens?

Most mother cats will move their babies around 3 or 4 weeks old. This could be because they ‘ve gotten too big for the basket you supplied her to give birth in. It may have simply gotten a little messy so it’s time for a cleaner space.

It can be exciting knowing that your cat is having a litter of cute kittens. But after theyre born, theres so much to keep an eye on as a cat owner. Some mother cats can start moving their kittens away from the nest area, and this can happen for a variety of reasons. There are a few methods that you can use to stop your mother cat from moving her kittens, though!

Image Credit: Christiane Hfer, PixabayWhile it can be incredibly exciting to have newborn kittens in the house, resist the urge to pick them up and cuddle them. Your mother cat should be doing a great job of looking after her kittens, and as long as she has a clean nest and access to food, water, and her litter tray, she needs minimal supervision.

As the kittens start moving around and exploring on their own, the mother cat will become more relaxed and accepting of people visiting her babies. Image Credit: JackieLou DL, PixabayAs soon as you know that your cat is expecting kittens, start thinking about potential locations for her nest. Image Credit: Ermolaev Alexander, ShutterstockSometimes a mother cat will move a single kitten if she thinks that they may be ill.

Uterine metritis is an infection that leads to fever, lethargy, decreased milk production, and a bad-smelling discharge from your cats uterus. Image Credit: New Africa, ShutterstockNewborn kittens cant regulate their own body temperature, so they need help keeping warm for the first few weeks of life. As part of your daily check, remove any soiled blankets, clean the litter box thoroughly, and make sure spilled food is cleared away.

Why Do Mother Cats Move Their Kittens?

Why does my female cat keep moving her kittens?” is a question often asked by owners. If you’re not a professional cat breeder, you may never have witnessed this behavior before. Thankfully, this is not a concern. All the same, it’s prudent to learn why your cat feels the need to move her young.

Privacy

One of the main reasons a cat will move her kittens is for privacy. Your cat is unlikely to welcome the prospect of feeding her young in full view of her human family. She’ll find a different spot.Your cat may be hiding from the father of her kittens. As per Biology of Reproduction, it takes a queen at least 6 weeks to enter heat again after giving birth. An intact tom needs no such recovery time, which can lead to conflict.

Excessive Stimulation

Kittens may be blind and deaf for the first 2 weeks of their lives, but this does not last. Once your kittens open their eyes and ears, they are subject to an assault on the senses. Their mother will seek to protect them from this.If an area that houses a cat and her young is too bright, the kittens will likely be moved. All cats dislike bright illumination, seeing better in dim surroundings, but kittens are particularly susceptible.Noise is also a concern. Avoid leaving the cat and kittens close to a television or stereo. Think about any walls, too. If the cats are close to loud neighbors or windows that leak a lot of sound from the street, it may distress the kittens.

Dirty or Soiled Territory

Cats grow increasingly fussy about their surroundings after giving birth. If their territory is dusty, grimy, or dirty, they will beat a hasty retreat and set up home elsewhere.

Warmth

Kittens need to run a warmer body temperature than adult cats. This is why kittens often cuddle up together or gain heat from their mother. This is especially important for newborns.If a cat feels that her kittens are not warm enough, she will look for new territory for them. Kittens need an ambient temperature of around 80 degrees. That may seem warm, but you can also reduce it by five degrees or so as they age.

Safety

Life can be frightening for a cat, and that goes double for kittens. The conventional predators of adult cats, such as coyotes, will make short work of a kitten. Your cat will do whatever it takes to keep her young safe.Your cat will also protect her kittens from you, whether you know it or not. Perhaps more importantly, the kittens will be safeguarded from jealous rivals. Other cats in the home, including the kittens’ father, may react poorly to new animals stealing attention. Alternatively, a male cat may look to play a little rougher than kittens can tolerate.Until the other cats in your household adjust to these new arrivals, the kittens will need to be kept safe. If that involves keeping the kittens out of the way, so be it.

Education

Kittens take the lead of their mothers in all walks of life. Your cat will take her responsibility to impart life lessons seriously. As soon as the kittens are old enough, she will teach them to hunt, use the litter tray and find food or water.This will, naturally, involve leaving the nesting box. While your kittens will typically follow your cat, she may initially move them. Do not panic about this. It is an indispensable part of kittens learning the independence they’ll need when they go to new homes.

How Far Do Cats Move Their Kittens?

Cats often struggle to find the right balance when it comes to moving their kittens. On the one hand, the cat wants to put a safe distance between their birthing site and any potential predators. On the other, your cat will prefer to stick to familiar terrain.A cat will rarely attempt to take her kittens outside. The kittens will often end up on the same floor of the house as your cat’s nesting box. Check these sites first, as well as other places your cat frequents.

Why Does My Cat Separate Her Kittens?

The majority of the time, a cat moving her kittens is a package deal. Your cat will move her entire litter at the same time. If you find yourself wondering why your cat keeps moving one of her kittens and not the others, it’s likely bad news for the kitten.Most litters have a runt – the smallest, weakest member of the family. Following an extensive birth, this runt may be excluded from feeding and lessons. Often, this leads to the kitten dying without external intervention.This sounds cruel, especially from such a maternal animal as a cat. How could a mother leave her baby to die? To the cat, this is a sacrifice for the greater good. A cat can only feed so many kittens, and greater emphasis is placed on those likeliest to survive.You can save the runt of a litter if you intervene quickly. Take this kitten to a vet and ensure it receives adequate warmth and food. This will keep the kitten alive for a spell, at the very least.Kitten isolation is not always due to Darwinism. One kitten may be separated from a group as it is aggressive or carries a potentially contagious illness. The result remains the same, though. Lacking food and warmth, you must immediately rescue the kitten.

Avoid Handling Kittens

Unless it is strictly necessary, do anything you can to avoid handling kittens for the first 2 weeks of their life. Kittens are so vulnerable at this age that your cat will do whatever it takes to protect them.For a start, you may be accidentally hurting the kittens. Even if you are not, you are likely scaring the animals out of their wits. They cannot see or hear you and will not recognize your scent. Handling removes them from their source of warmth and food.You need to accept that your cat may not trust your intentions, either. All a cat cares about is protecting her young. It does not matter how well you treat her. She may assume that you intend something untoward. As a result, she’ll bite and scratch to deter approach.The more you handle kittens in this pivotal, early stage of development, the stronger your scent will be. Such an aroma will not go unnoticed by your cat, so she’ll consider it necessary to hide her babies. Avoid giving this impression.

Keep Territory Clean, Warm and Quiet

As mentioned, your cat will want to keep her kittens calm, quiet, and clean. This is a balancing act. Clean too much, and you’ll be considered a territorial invader. Ignore it, and the cat will abandon her terrain.The best time to act is to wait for your cat to move her kittens. While the area is vacant, remove anything untoward such as soiling. Cats and kittens alike will still want familiar scents, so switch one pre-used blanket for another.Get a thermometer for the wall. If the ambient temperature around your cat and kitten nest drops below 80 degrees regularly, watch to see if this coincides with moving. If so, find a safe way to provide a little more warmth – either heaters or blankets.

4. Make sure the nest is warm

Newborn kittens can’t regulate their own body temperature, so they need help keeping warm for the first few weeks of life. If there are drafts where your mother cat has made her nest, then she may decide to move it to a warmer place. Check that doors and windows are kept shut. You might even consider adding a thermometer to the room so you can keep an eye on the temperature.

5. Keep the nest clean

Cats will instinctively want to keep their kittens somewhere clean. That’s because strong scents can attract predators in the wild, and that will put the lives of her kittens in danger. If the nest is becoming dirty, then she might start trying to move her kittens to a cleaner spot.As part of your daily check, remove any soiled blankets, clean the litter box thoroughly, and make sure spilled food is cleared away. If the nest and surrounding area are as clean as possible, the mother cat will be more likely to stay in the same spot.