Why Does My Cat Have Blood in His Poop?

We all do it. We do it every time we change the litter or hear the call of compacted clay being clawed. Im talking about inspecting our cats poop. We humans are inexplicably interested in monitoring our companion animals eliminations. And thats a good thing. Identifying a bathroom problem early can prevent more serious complications and restore health to an ailing kitty. According to the petinsurance.com, intestinal upset/diarrhea was the sixth top medical condition of cats in 2015. One of the most common intestinal irregularities cat parents report is blood or mucus in the stool. Should you worry if you spot beads of blood or mounds of mucus in the litter box? Lets find out.

Grading the fecal quality and estimating the quantity can help your veterinarian more quickly, and correctly, diagnose your cats condition. Bright red blood without either diarrhea or hard, dry stools generally indicates the problem is closer to the rectum and anus.

Mucus is a normal secretion of the intestinal tract to help lubricate and moisten the linings and facilitate fecal passage. It is abnormal to see lots of slimy, often clear to pale yellow-green liquid accompanying your cats bowel movements. What will my veterinarian do to determine the cause of the blood or mucus in my cats poop?Most of these problems can be diagnosed on medical history, physical examination, and microscopic fecal evaluation.

Is blood in cat stool an emergency?

Blood in the stool can result from common and minor ailments or may be an indication of serious underlying infection or sickness. While this is not always an emergency condition, if the blood in the stool persists for more than short periods of time or occurs frequently, you should seek veterinary care for your cat.

What do I do if my cat has blood in her poop?

Always contact your vet if you notice blood in your cat’s poo. If there is only a very small amount of blood, your cat is bright, eating properly and seems otherwise healthy and happy, your vet may advise trying to settle their stomach for 24 hours before having an appointment.

Can roundworms cause bloody diarrhea in cats?

These parasites can be wormlike or one-celled protozoan organisms. They usually cause fairly nonspecific symptoms, such as a dull coat, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, mucousy or bloody feces, loss of appetite, pale mucous membranes, or a potbellied appearance.

Cleaning the cats litter box probably doesnt top anyones list of favorite activities. However, regular checks into your cats bathroom habits can tell you a lot about their day-to-day health. Disposing used cat litter gives you a heads-up to changes in your pet changes like bloody stools that indicate somethings wrong. And while blood is alarming, you may not need to rush Kitty to the vet.

It also localizes a potential issue to the lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract: the colon or rectum. This results from digested blood, and it means youre dealing with the upper GI tract: the stomach or small intestine.

If the kitty bum checks out, but youre noting red on your cats stool, its time to consider potential issues in the lower end of the GI tract. On the flip side, the straining associated with constipation often results in ruptured blood vessels in the GI tracts lining. If your cats behaving normally, eating without a problem, and not vomiting, you dont need to rush to the ER just yet.

After all, stress can cause inflammation to crop up and give your cats GI tract a wobble. An over-the-counter probiotic can help kick out unwanted bacterial overgrowth, allowing healthy bacteria to settle back in. A simple teaspoon of pumpkin mixed into your cats food will provide the fiber their GI tract needs.

Just skip pumpkin pie filling: Those spices will make the GI upset worse. And if the amount of blood increases, or your cats acting sick, make that appointment ASAP. Cats naturally hide signs they arent feeling well, so theres a big problem if you see warnings.

When youre cleaning out the litter box and notice a bright red streak of blood in your cats stool, or a stool thats black and tarry looking, its a shock. Questions pop into your head immediately: What does this mean? Is my cat sick? Is it serious? Should I take him to the vet?

The veterinarian can determine the seriousness of the issue and how to best treat your cat. Take careful note of the color of the blood in your cats stool.

If its bright red, that means the bleeding is most likely occurring in the rectum or lower intestines. If it looks dark or more like black tar, that means its older blood and comes from bleeding in the upper GI tract. Difficulty or crying while pooping Frequent urination or drinking Vomiting (if vomiting blood this is a medical emergency) Constipation / straining to defecate Anorexia and weight loss Diarrhea Anal lumps Anus blocked by matted hair and fecal matter Bloody diarrhea, or mucus in the diarrhea Draining of pus from the anal area Hard feces Lethargy (combined with blood in the stool/rectal bleeding this is a medical emergency)

Make good notes of all of the visible symptoms carefully so you can tell the vet when you visit. Your observations will be of tremendous help in the diagnosis since your cat cant talk! Its also a really good idea to take a sample of the stool with you (a plastic bag works great to collect and transport the stool sample) to the veterinarian.

The stool sample can assist in the diagnosis of your cats issue. Try as best you can to differentiate between blood in the stool and blood in the urine. If your cat has blood in his urine, thats a different set of issues.

Bright red blood in your cats poop is called hematochezia. When your cat has a difficult or painful time defecating, its called dyschezia. Both of these are symptoms that your cat may have an underlying condition that causes inflammation or irritation of the rectum or anus.

Since cats are stoic characters, they are generally slow to complain or exhibit symptoms so its entirely possible that this condition is worse than you might at first think. There are many reasons your cat could have developed hematochezia. Change in your cats diet / too much human food / too much food altogether Trauma to the digestive system from the nose to the anal region (bites from a cat fight, fractured pelvis, etc.)

Stress Bowel disease that causes chronic irritation to your cats gastrointestinal tract Inflammation of the colon (colitis) Intestinal infection due to bacteria or parasites Anal sac abscess (these can get itchy, causing your cat to rub her hind end on the ground) Medications, especially NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) or strong antibiotics Tumors (both malignant and benign can cause bleeding) Ingestion of mouse or rat poison (anti-coagulants that disable blood clotting this would be a medical emergency) Cats who are diagnosed with hematochezia (blood in cat feces) are usually treated on an outpatient basis. If the underlying condition is severe enough, such as dehydration or internal bleeding, the vet will need to get those under control before releasing your cat back into your care.

Depending on the underlying cause that is diagnosed, your vet may prescribe antibiotics or other medications, such as anti-inflammatory drugs and/or laxatives. In many cases, where the problem was caused by changes or problems related to the cats food the vet may prescribe a change in diet (see below). If the anal canal is restricted, the vet may do a balloon dilation to widen the canal gradually so that the blocked feces can be released.

Conditions like condyloma, fistulas, hemorrhoids and fissures are classified as anorectal diseases. Some anorectal diseases may require surgery to cure. If the vet pinpoints your cats diet as a source of the blood in his stool, here are a few tips:

Dont change your cats diet suddenly. Your cat may have a food intolerance. An exclusion diet (eliminating certain ingredients to see if symptoms go away) may be the best way to find the food ingredients that are causing the irritation to his system.

Your vet can recommend the best way to go about an exclusion diet. Dont make any changes without your vets approval. Cats can not only be finicky, but they can also be sensitive to changes in their food.

You dont want to make the situation worse. So, the bottom line is: If you see blood in your cats stool, take him to vet right away. It might or might not be a serious illness but its definitely a sign that something is wrong and your cat needs help to heal!

In the meantime, you can learn more about how to keep your pointy-eared buddy happy and healthy through our cat blog or cat page ! We hope you found this article helpful and if your cat ever gets any cuts, abrasions, ear infections or ringworm , we hope you keep Banixx Pet Care in mind.

– If your pet is on anti-inflammatory medication such as steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, discontinue the medication and seek veterinary attention immediately.

If your pet is lethargic, inappetent, depressed, has other signs of trauma or pain on defecation, seek veterinary attention immediately. If a large volume of blood is passed, seek veterinary attention immediately.

If your pet shows no other signs of illness and there is a small amount of blood in the stool, you can add fibre to the diet (for example, teaspoon of bran or psyllium husk, or mashed pumpkin), or alternatively use a commercial high-fibre diet. Where constipation secondary to fur balls is suspected, teaspoon of cod liver oil or a dose of a commercially available paraffin-based pet laxative once a day for three days may aid in the passage of stool. DO NOT GIVE ENEMAS SOLD FOR USE IN HUMANS TO YOUR PET UNLESS PRESCRIBED BY A VETERINARIAN AS THESE ARE POTENTIALLY HARMFUL.

Haematochezia originates in the colon, rectum or anus and refers to fresh blood. Melena produces dark, tarry stool due to the presence of digested blood from the upper gastrointestinal tract (the stomach and small intestine). Inappetence Vomiting Depression Weight loss Pale gums Other injuries (in the case of trauma)

Inflammatory bowel disease Infection (parvovirus) Gastric ulceration Foreign body Stomach or intestinal cancers Inflammation (colitis) Infection (campylobacter) Benign growths in the bowel or rectum (polyps) Parasites (hookworms, whipworms, roundworms, coccidia) Your veterinarian will perform a full physical examination including a rectal exam, and in some cases x-rays or ultrasound.

Blood and urine tests may be recommended to evaluate the systemic health of your pet. Hall E (2009) Canine diarrhoea: a rational approach to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Mansfield CS, James FE, Craven M, Davies DR, OHara AJ, Nicholls PK, Dogan B, MacDonagh SP & Simpson KW (2009) Remission of histiocytic ulcerative colitis in Boxer Dogs correlates with eradication of invasive intramucosal Escherichia coli.

Washabau RJ (1999) Pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of feline idiopathic megacolon.Veterinary Clinics of North America Small Animal Practice 29(2):589-603. Weese JS (2011) Bacterial enteritis in dogs and cats: diagnosis, therapy and zoonotic potential.

Sources of hematochezia

You may see two kinds of blood in your cat’s stool. And knowing which you’re dealing with matters. They tell you where the problem comes from:

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

If your cat’s having diarrhea or showing signs of constipation, their body’s craving moisture. Providing as much water as possible will help. Set out extra water bowls, splurge on a water fountain, or make a switch from dry food to canned food. Most cats don’t get enough fluid in their day-to-day intake, so providing extra goes a long way.

Dietary assistance

Sometimes, your cat needs a GI reset. The bloody stools you’re seeing represent inflammation in the system. An over-the-counter probiotic can help kick out unwanted bacterial overgrowth, allowing healthy bacteria to settle back in. Most cat probiotics mix into canned foods, and cats usually love the flavor.Are you seeing constipation warnings? A simple teaspoon of pumpkin mixed into your cat’s food will provide the fiber their GI tract needs. Sure, cats are carnivores, but they don’t mind that little bit of fruit. Just skip pumpkin

Rest and relaxation

Also, review any recent changes in the household. Did the bloody stools appear in the litter box after a new addition? Has your cat shown other signs of stress? You may need to provide some calming time to help your kitty’s system wind down.

Time to call the vet?

If you see blood in your cat’s stools for more than a few days, it’s time to make a vet appointment. And if the amount of blood increases, or your cat’s acting sick, make that appointment ASAP. Cats naturally hide signs they aren’t feeling well, so there’s a big problem if you see warnings. You don’t want to waste time with home remedies.

Litter box health matters

Sure, it seems silly to scope out your cat’s litter box. But there’s a lot of information in your cat’s stools. You may find a warning of a brewing problem. And while bloody cat stools are frightening, they may not signal a serious issue. Keep an eye on your cat first — before you hit the panic button.

What Causes Blood in Cat Stool?

Take careful note of the color of the blood in your cat’s stool. If it’s bright red, that means the bleeding is most likely occurring in the rectum or lower intestines. If it looks dark or more like black tar, that means its older blood and comes from bleeding in the upper GI tract. Your vet will want to know this information.
Make good notes of all of the visible symptoms carefully so you can tell the vet when you visit. Your observations will be of tremendous help in the diagnosis since —your cat can’t talk! It’s also a really good idea to take a sample of the stool with you (a plastic bag works great to collect and transport the stool sample) to the veterinarian. The stool sample can assist in the diagnosis of your cat’s issue.Try as best you can to differentiate between blood in the stool and blood in the urine. If your cat has blood in his urine, that’s a different set of issues.

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If the vet pinpoints your cat’s diet as a source of the blood in his stool, here are a few tips:So, the bottom line is: If you see blood in your cat’s stool, take him to vet right away. It might or might not be a serious illness – but it’s definitely a sign that something is wrong and your cat needs help to heal!In the meantime, you can learn more about how to keep your pointy-eared buddy happy and healthy through our cat blog or cat page! We hope you found this article helpful and if your cat ever gets any cuts, abrasions, ear infections or ringworm, we hope you keep Banixx Pet Care in mind.

WHAT IS IT?

Blood in the stool is known as haemtochezia or melena and may appear as blood mixed throughout the stool, at the tail end of stool or, in severe cases, the whole stool may consist of blood.Haematochezia originates in the colon, rectum or anus and refers to fresh blood.Melena produces dark, tarry stool due to the presence of digested blood from the upper gastrointestinal tract (the stomach and small intestine).

TREATMENT

Signs depend on where in the gastrointestinal tract the blood originates from.Other signs may include: