Why Do Dogs Pee on Beds?

If your dog is peeing on your bed, you are likely beyond frustrated. Dog urine can ruin your bed. Plus, once the urine odor is there, your dog can be attracted to pee on the area again.

It’s important to begin by ruling out medical causes before you try to address potential behavioral problems. Other issues with the urinary tract can make it difficult for dogs to control bladder activity.

Hormone-responsive urinary incontinence is not uncommon in female dogs and may even affect males though more rare. If your vet rules out all potential medical reasons for your dog’s inappropriate urination, then it’s time to work on correcting the behavior. An anxious or fearful dog is unable to learn new things, so you will need to reduce stress before you work on training.

Why did my dog pee on my bed all of a sudden?

Your dog could be leaving his scent in your sheets for several reasons. He might have a medical condition, be anxious, excited, or nervous, not be properly house trained, marking, or just like your scent. … If your dog is anxious or nervous, he might pee all over the place, including your bed.

How do you get a dog to stop peeing on the bed?

Your vet may be able to help with anti-anxiety medications or supplements. When training your dog to stop peeing on your bed, you must first restrict access to your bed when you are not around. Keep the bedroom door closed while you are gone. If needed, keep your dog in a crate for reasonable amounts of time when gone.

Do dogs pee out of spite?

Dogs do not urinate or defecate out of spite or jealousy. The unfamiliar scents and sounds of a new home may be stressing and he feels the need to reaffirm his claim on his territory.

It’s important to consult your pet’s veterinarian with any medical concerns, and before making any changes or adding supplements to your pet’s health plan.

If it happens regularly, try to identify potential triggers that might have set him off, such as a loud noise, an unfamiliar face, or you stepping out the door. Many canines who are threatened or stressed will resort to this behavior, usually as a response to a new arrival in the home, like a baby or another pet.

A dog wetting the bed may be cause for a medical concern, so if your pet has made a habit out of it, maybe it’s time for a visit to the veterinarian. Frequent and uncontrollable elimination can also be indicative of other conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, bladder stones, arthritis, and kidney disease. The easiest way to stop your pup from relieving himself at a specific spot is by cleaning the pee with a cleaner like Charlie & Max Pet Odor and Stain Eliminator .

The best thing at the end of a long day is taking a relaxing shower and flopping into bed. Youve dreamt about your pillow and comforter all day. Its finally time. You get into your PJs, turn off the light, and slide into bed. But something is not right. It feels wet? What on earth? You sit up, feel around, and it turns out there is a puddle on your bed. You look at the ceiling for a leak, you feel around for a water bottle or glass of something that might have spilled, but you find nothing. You prep for the sniff test. As youre leaning in to get a whiff, your dog comes in with his tail between his legs. You dont have to sniff; you know who did it.

If your dog is urinating on the bed when youre not home, close the bedroom door and make sure someone comes by during the day to walk him.

Sometimes even housetrained dogs do it they pee on the bed. Of all the places to go potty in the house, why the bed? If this sounds like your dog, then read on to find out the reasons behind your dog peeing on the bed and what you can do to stop it.

Your best bet is to start housetraining over again from the beginning to establish firm boundaries and house rules with your dog. UTIs, urinary stones, prostate problems, spinal injury, hormonal imbalances, and certain medications can all lead to incontinence.

Its especially common when theyre stressed out or being disciplined or in a submissive position such as lying on their back with belly exposed or standing with a tucked tail. What to do about it: If you think your dog is engaging in submissive peeing, understand that this is a psychological, not a physical, problem. Scolding, punishing, or getting angry can make the situation worse, so stay calm and use positive reinforcement to reward behavior you approve of, like going potty outside and displaying confident postures.

When your dogs afraid, whether from a loud thunderstorm or vacuum cleaner or something else, they may run to your bed because they feel safe and secure there. Just adding in one short walk to your daily routine or an extra late night potty break could give your dog the chance they need to go and empty their bladder. Different dogs will have different potty break frequency needs, which can also fluctuate during warmer months when theyre drinking more water.

Wash your bedding in hot water and use an enzyme pet cleaning solution on your mattress if the urine soaked through. Keep the door to your bedroom closed or keep your dog in a crate or restricted to another part of the house. If a dog soils his or her bed, simply washing Forgiveness with soap and water will not only eliminate foul smells, but rid the mattress of any dust mites, allergens or other contaminants that generally build in mattresses over time.

The Forgiveness Dog Sofa , from $199.95-$399.95, is made with a 5 thick mattress thats fully washable with soap and water, which not only gets rid of urine and odor, but eliminates dust mites, allergens, and other contaminants, too.

Why Dogs Pee on the Bed

There are several possible reasons your dog is peeing on your bed. It’s important to begin by ruling out medical causes before you try to address potential behavioral problems.

Urinary Tract or Kidney Problems

Urinary tract infections commonly cause dogs to have urinary accidents. Your vet may need a urine sample to run a urinalysis. If your dog does have a UTI, antibiotics will be needed to clear it up. Other issues with the urinary tract can make it difficult for dogs to control bladder activity.Other possible urinary problems seen in dogs include cystitis (inflammation of the bladder), crystals in the urine, bladder stones, structural abnormalities, kidney disease, and even tumors. Most urinary issues can be treated with medications, supplements, or diet changes. In more extreme cases, issues like bladder stones may require surgery.Certain diseases like diabetes and Cushing’s disease can affect the urinary tract, as well.

Incontinence

Dogs with urinary incontinence will leak urine involuntarily. This may occur only while the dog is asleep, but some dogs with incontinence will dribble urine while they are awake as well. Incontinence is relatively common in senior dogs, but certain conditions can cause incontinence in young dogs, as well. Hormone-responsive urinary incontinence is not uncommon in female dogs and may even affect males though more rare. Fortunately, medications are available to help.

Housetraining Issues

Is your dog fully housetrained? Some dogs will appear to be mostly housetrained but then will find a favorite place to relieve themselves indoors. This may be your bed! If you think housetraining is the issue, then it’s time to work more with your dog on training.

Excitement, Fear, Stress, or Anxiety

Excitement urination is common in younger dogs. They tend to dribble some urine when they are overly excited or are put in a submissive position. Many dogs grow out of this behavior, but some will need training if it continues into adulthood.Fear, stress, and anxiety can all cause a dog to urinate inappropriately. Changes to your dog’s environment may explain sudden stress. However, underlying medical conditions also cause stress to your dog. Rule out health problems first, then try to reduce your dog’s stress as much as possible.

Territorial Marking

Some dogs are more territorial than others. Many like to mark their territory with urine. However, when they do this to your bed, it becomes a major problem for you. Territorial marking can be minimized through training and behavior modification.

Your Pup’s Bathroom Needs Have Been Neglected

Nothing may be wrong, even if there’s been a peeing incident. Perhaps, your adult pooch simply never learned all the rules of potty training. Despite the popular belief in old dogs and new tricks, even adult pooches can be housetrained with time and patience.Another reason for the bed peeing accident may be the lack of ample bathroom breaks. If you’ve been leaving for long periods without popping in every few hours, it’s not so strange to discover a puddle of pee in the house.Take now that puppies typically need to relieve themselves every two hours, and even older canines should be let out at least three to five times a day.

Dog Anxiety, Stress, or Fear

Stinky accidents like these may be a drag for you, but it’s probably worse for little Fido. Peeing and pooping in strange places can be linked to a dog’s emotional distress. The reason for their distress can be as easy to identify as thunderstorms or a new house guest, but it can also be as innocuous as a change in the house such as a new piece of furniture.When dogs are stressed, it can cause them to lose control of their bladder temporarily. If they’re scared of something, it’s also possible that they’re eliminating on the bed because they’re too afraid to go to their usual spot. Separation anxiety is also linked to dogs urinating in the house.Observe your pup closely in the hours after his little accident. If it happens regularly, try to identify potential triggers that might have set him off, such as a loud noise, an unfamiliar face, or you stepping out the door. Treats for relaxation and anxiety relief may help him settle down and feel more at ease, especially at nighttime.

Marking Territory

One of the most common reasons is marking behavior. If your dog is peeing in various places around the house in small amounts, he might be claiming his territory instead of urinating to relieve himself.While this behavior is more common among male dogs, it’s not unheard of among female dogs. Many canines who are threatened or stressed will resort to this behavior, usually as a response to a new arrival in the home, like a baby or another pet. It’s also more common among pups that haven’t been spayed or neutered.

Medical Reasons

A dog wetting the bed may be cause for a medical concern, so if your pet has made a habit out of it, maybe it’s time for a visit to the veterinarian. Incontinence or reduced bladder control is one of the symptoms of urinary tract infection, a painful bacterial infection that can be treated with antibiotics.Frequent and uncontrollable elimination can also be indicative of other conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, bladder stones, arthritis, and kidney disease.

Introduction

The best thing at the end of a long day is taking a relaxing shower and flopping into bed. You’ve dreamt about your pillow and comforter all day. It’s finally time. You get into your PJs, turn off the light, and slide into bed. But something is not right. It feels… wet? What on earth? You sit up, feel around, and it turns out there is a puddle on your bed. You look at the ceiling for a leak, you feel around for a water bottle or glass of something that might have spilled, but you find nothing. You prep for the sniff test. As you’re leaning in to get a whiff, your dog comes in with his tail between his legs. You don’t have to sniff; you know who did it.

Encouraging the Behavior

Nobody wants to get into bed just to get out to wash the sheets and scrub the mattress. You want to stop this behavior right away before your dog develops bad habits. Dog urine is not good for your mattress or bedsheets and cleaning it will take time away from your much-anticipated slumber, which can be very frustrating. If you suspect your dog has a medical issue, it’s critical to take him to the vet. Diabetes is a serious condition that requires monitoring and medication. A urinary tract infection is painful and uncomfortable and will only get worse without treatment. Your vet will recommend medications and treatments to fix these problems. If your dog is severely affected by anxiety, your vet can suggest medications for that as well. The vet will help diagnose and treat any of these conditions, but a trainer might be a good approach, too. If your dog is marking, not house trained, or just excited, the trainer can work with you and your dog to remedy these problems. You might need to reintroduce house training or establish your dominance as the alpha. If your dog piddles when he gets excited, do not add to the excitement when he is in your bed.

Other Solutions and Considerations

Remember never to yell at your dog for urinating or defecating, even indoors. This will confuse him and possibly worsen the problem. When you work with the trainer, make sure you stay consistent with your training. Inconsistency will confuse your dog and make it less effective. Give your dog plenty of opportunities to relieve himself outside so he does not feel the need to urinate indoors. If your dog is drinking a lot of water, get him checked for diabetes, but also make sure his diet is not high in salt. Salt can make him thirsty which will make him urinate more. You might also consider limiting his access to parts of the house. If your dog is urinating on the bed when you’re not home, close the bedroom door and make sure someone comes by during the day to walk him. If he urinates on your bed when you’re there, then work with the trainer to change this behavior. When you need to clean up, there are special cleaners that eliminate an animal’s scent after he’s peed on something like bedding or carpet. They’re affordable and easy to use and will discourage a repeat offender if his reason is marking.

Why do dogs pee on beds?

Sometimes even housetrained dogs do it – they pee on the bed. Of all the places to go potty in the house,There’s no one reason dogs pee on the bed so there’s no one solution to stopping it. The underlying cause could beDog owners know that housetraining can be a long and challenging process. You may think you’re done with it, but it’s possible your dog still doesn’t know the rules of the house and thinks that peeing on the bed is okay.Simple urinary incontinence could be the reason your dog pees on the bed. As with humans, incontinence is more common with age, but younger dogs can be incontinent for a variety of reasons. UTIs, urinary stones, prostate problems, spinal injury, hormonal imbalances, and certain medications can all lead to incontinence.All dogs can engage in marking, or leaving small amounts of urine in multiple places, but it’s more common in dogs that haven’t been spayed or neutered, especially males. And since they’re more likely to mark objects that smell strongly, that means your bed – which smells a lot like you – is a prime candidate for marking.You’re the pack leader and “top dog” in your house, and your dog recognizes that. One way they may demonstrate their submissiveness is through submissive peeing to show they’re not a threat to you. It’s especially common when they’re stressed out or being disciplined or in a submissive position such as lying on their back with belly exposed or standing with a tucked tail.When your dog’s afraid, whether from a loud thunderstorm or vacuum cleaner or something else, they may run to your bed because they feel safe and secure there. (Again, your scent is a big part of that.) At the same time, their fear may cause them to pee.In addition to following the relevant steps above, there are some additional tips to help curb your dog’s bed-peeing behavior.This tip is obvious, but don’t overlook it! Just adding in one short walk to your daily routine or an extra late night potty break could give your dog the chance they need to go and empty their bladder. Different dogs will have different potty break frequency needs, which can also fluctuate during warmer months when they’re drinking more water.Dogs like to return to spots they’ve previously marked to do it again, so after an accident be sure to cleanKeep the door to your bedroom closed or keep your dog in a crate or restricted to another part of the house. This won’t address the underlying issue, but will keep your bed pee free!Dogs that pee on their owner’s bed may have a tendency to pee on their own beds, too. If that’s the case with your dog, then check out Snoozer’s Forgiveness washable dog beds, the first

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