Why Do Dogs Mark Their Territory?

You mark your stuff by putting your name on it; your dog marks theirs with urine. We’ve covered why dogs submissively urinate, now here’s how to prevent urine-marking behaviors before they happen in your house.

Sign up to receive our exclusive e-book full of training techniques, problem-solving and important information about caring for your pet. Clean soiled areas thoroughly with a cleaner specifically designed to eliminate urine odor.

If you’ve added a new cat or new dog to your family, follow our tip sheets to help them live in harmony.

How do I stop my dog from marking his territory in the house?

Employ management. ….Reduce stress. ….Clean soiled areas. ….Consider neutering. ….Discourage all marking, even outdoors. ….Try a belly band. ….Most importantly, don’t punish!

Why is my dog marking in the house all of a sudden?

Usually it is because of feelings of insecurity or a perceived threat. … Changes cause him to feel anxious, which may cause him to mark. Some dogs feel the need to lift their leg and pee on all new things that enter your house, shopping bags, visitor’s belongings, new furniture, children’s toys etc.

Is marking territory bad for dogs?

Territoriality is not always a bad thing, but it is definitely bad for your home, because it involves urination around things or places that “belong” to the dog; exposure to the scent later can also trigger re-marking. Here is what you need to know in order to prevent this behavior.

Why does my dog mark everything on walks?

One of the primary ways that dogs communicate with each other is through smell (hence sniffing each other when they first meet, and sniffing constantly during walks — they are gathering information). Marking lets other dogs know that they are there, and maybe even that they are available for mating.

Leaving a scent mark with urine is a normal dog communicative behavior. Marking is most likely to occur on or near new or novel odors, especially the urine left by other dogs. The volume of urine used for marking is usually small. The problem is much more common in intact males, but many neutered males and spayed females also mark their territory. If your dog marks where other dogs have urinated, when exposed to new odors, or when entering a strange environment, it may be a form of territorial marking. This may be more likely to occur if you visit or move into a new home or if you redecorate or get new furniture. Supervising introductions or accessibility until your dog gets used to the new smells may be all that is required in these cases. Dogs that begin to mark in their home environment may be responding to stress or anxiety. Hormonal influences and sexual arousal, especially in intact male dogs, may also lead to an increase in marking behavior.

Ensure that all training is reward based and that your dog has a regular and stimulating routine of exercise and play (see Enrichment, Predictability, and Scheduling). If the problem is related to fear or anxiety toward another dog in the home, then separation, gradual supervised reintroduction and a program of desensitization and counter-conditioning may need to be implemented.

When you are available to supervise, you should be playing, training or exercising your dog, or ensuring that it is sufficiently occupied and relaxed that there is no attempt or desire to mark (see Enrichment, Predictability, and Scheduling). Should your pet begin to wander away or head toward objects that have been previously marked, you can prevent problems by interrupting your dog with a verbal command or leash, and giving him an activity to keep him occupied.

Spay (or neuter) first

Spay or neuter your dog as soon as possible. The longer a dog goes before being spayed or neutered, the more difficult it will be to train them not to mark in the house. Spaying or neutering your dog should reduce urine-marking and may stop it altogether.But if they have been marking for a long time, a pattern may already be established. Because it has become a learned behavior, spaying or neutering alone won’t solve the problem. Use techniques for housetraining an adult dog to modify your dog’s marking behavior.Sign up to receive our exclusive e-book full of training techniques, problem-solving and important information about caring for your pet.

How do I reduce outdoor marking?

Dogsmark” by urinating on upright objects.Leaving a scent mark with urine is a normal dog communicative behavior. Marking is most likely to occur on or near new or novel odors, especially the urine left by other dogs. The volume of urine used for marking is usually small. The problem is much more common in intact males, but many neutered males and spayed females also mark their territory. If your dog marks where other dogs have urinated, when exposed to new odors, or when entering a strange environment, it may be a form of territorial marking. This may be more likely to occur if you visit or move into a new home or if you redecorate or get new furniture. Supervising introductions or accessibility until your dog gets used to the new smells may be all that is required in these cases. Dogs that begin to mark in their home environment may be responding to stress or anxiety. Hormonal influences and sexual arousal, especially in intact male dogs, may also lead to an increase in marking behavior.