Why Do Dogs Lick Your Feet?

Dog behavior makes people laugh all the time. Which is great, unless were talking about the involuntarily laughter that spills out when your dog is licking your feet. For many ticklish dog owners, the slippery slobbering sensation of getting a foot bath from Fido is an exquisite form of torture.

If thats the case, the real reason for the licking could be some sort of stress in the dogs life a change in routine, an underlying health issue, or something else along those lines.

Is it bad for your dog to lick your feet?

Have you ever wondered: why does my dog lick my feet? For some owners, this behavior may seem odd. And for those with ticklish feet, it can be downright unpleasant, especially if your pup’s licking becomes a regular occurrence. But licking is a perfectly normal behavior for dogs.

Why are dogs obsessed with feet?

Dogs rely heavily on their highly receptive senses of smell and taste. There are several ways a dog could be using these senses so obsessively with your feet. … Dogs also may lick feet because they are stressed and feel soothed by the endorphins released while licking your feet.

Have you ever wondered: why does my dog lick my feet? For some owners, this behavior may seem odd. And for those with ticklish feet, it can be downright unpleasant, especially if your pups licking becomes a regular occurrence. But licking is a perfectly normal behavior for dogs. They lick to communicate and to take in their surroundings.

AKCs Chief Veterinary Officer Dr. Jerry Klein says that if your canine companion is licking only one paw, look for cuts or abrasions (or even an insect bite).

Dogs do things that we might not love, and licking our feet is one of those things. We should never forget that our dogs are designed to communicate with others without using words. Communicating with dogs is like trying to learn a foreign language, only harder because even the familiar letters are absent. Understanding why your dog does what he does is critical in maintaining your bond and growing your friendship. It makes you a better friend.

motivates participants to coordinate actions directed towards a shared goal that enhances each individuals fitness.

1. Your feet are meat

If there’s one thing we can say about dogs, it’s that they’re constantly looking for something to eat. Perhaps it’s crossed your dog’s mind that your fleshy, salty feet are like large, ambulatory chicken breasts (bone-in). Or maybe if you have hard, calloused feet, they give off more of a rawhide chew vibe. The dog likely knows that chowing down on Mom or Dad isn’t going to go over well. So they take their gustatory probing as far as they can – they lick.

2. Your feet are nasty

Dogs love gross stuff. They like to roll on dead things, rummage in garbage, root around in mud, and even eat poop. The more disgusting something is to a human, the more irresistible it is to a dog. Now think about what it means that your dog is obsessed with your feet. Maybe it’s time to take care of that fungus problem, or get some more breathable shoes so your feet don’t get so sweaty at the end of a long day.

3. Your feet are at their mercy

Dogs may lick feet for the exact same reasons they lick faces. The difference is, it’s harder for you to defend yourself from unwanted advances toward your toes (at least without kicking your best friend). This strategy might be particularly attractive to shorter dogs, who have to get their licks in whenever and wherever they can.

4. They have a problem

There’s a difference between an occasional toe taster and a full-time foot freak. If your dog falls into the latter category, you may be looking at compulsive behavior that’s being used as a coping mechanism. If that’s the case, the

So, Why Feet?

Sweaty, stinky feet are full of biological information, such as pheromones. Sweat also contains salt, which many dogs find appealing. There is a difference, however, between an occasional lick and a licking habit. If your dog takes licking a step too far, it could be a behavioral problem.When your dog licks your feet, chances are you respond immediately. This can quickly develop into an attention-seeking behavior, especially if your dog thinks it’s a game. The good news is that with a bit of training, you can spare your toes from further assault.