Why Do Dogs Lick Other Dogs Faces?

Humans often think of canine licking as being nothing more or less than a sign of love and adoration. Although it sometimes is, indeed, a tender gesture, the behavior also often goes a little deeper than that, both in sprightly young puppies and in wise adult pooches. Face licking frequently denotes feelings of subordination.

By licking his face, he’s trying to establish a harmonious and pleasant rapport with him, communicating that he has no desire to dispute his status. If your other dog has taken your pup under his wing, and they’ve both bonded and connected in the time Junior has been in your residence, face licking could be totally unrelated to submission and dominance.

When young puppies lick their owners’ faces, it sometimes even is a way to get attention to ask for food or tasty treats. Puppies out in nature also lick their mothers’ faces to trigger them to regurgitate food — in soft gruel form.

What does it mean when my dog licks my other dog?

The first dog licks the muzzle of the second dog to simply reconfirm that he comes in peace. … Dogs who are already friends will also trade smooches. Two strongly bonded canine pals will lick and groom each other. They give each other “dog kisses” in displays of affection and friendship.

Why does my puppy lick my older dogs face?

If your puppy keeps licking your other dog’s face, it’s probably because he knows that your other pet has seniority and, therefore, is the “top dog” in your home. By licking his face, he’s trying to establish a harmonious and pleasant rapport with him, communicating that he has no desire to dispute his status.

What could be cuter than your puppy giving his doggy pal a smooch on the nose? Nothing, really. But is your dog actually planting a kiss on his buddy? Yes, but that’s only one reason your dog may lick another dog’s muzzle.

Then call them over and have them do a command such as sit or shake paws . Offer them treats simultaneously as a reward for being good to each other.

When a dog licks the face of another, the behavior probably can be traced to the puppy stage. A puppys display of licking signaled a desire to be fed. In adult dogs, it could be a sign of respect.

As a dog trainer I often coach clients on how to interpret and guide the interactions between multiple dogs in the household. Read on to find out everything about the peculiar doggy habit of licking each others faces!

Deference

When a young puppy senses that another dog is a lot stronger, and higher up socially, than he is, he might respond by trying to behave in a humble manner. Remember, dogs naturally live in pack societies that are centered around the power of alpha dogs. Your wee puppy is aware of the dominance of the other dog, who usually is older. If your puppy keeps licking your other dog’s face, it’s probably because he knows that your other pet has seniority and, therefore, is the “top dog” in your home. By licking his face, he’s trying to establish a harmonious and pleasant rapport with him, communicating that he has no desire to dispute his status.

Affection

If your puppy has a penchant for licking your other dog on the face, it could be a sign of positive and amiable feelings between them, as long as the other dog does it in return. If your other dog has taken your pup under his wing, and they’ve both bonded and connected in the time Junior has been in your residence, face licking could be totally unrelated to submission and dominance. It actually could be a sign of caring and confidence between the furry twosome — aww, It doesn’t get much sweeter than that.

Presence of a Wound

Never make any assumptions regarding what your pets might be doing until you take a closer look. If your puppy is licking your other dog’s face a lot, it might indicate the presence of a wound, rather than submission or companionship. If that’s the case, your other dog might require prompt veterinary assistance, so don’t ignore it. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet.

Licking Peoples’ Faces, Too

Puppies and mature dogs don’t limit their face licking just to fellow canines. They also frequently do it to humans they perceive to be dominant over them, such as their owners. When young puppies lick their owners’ faces, it sometimes even is a way to get attention to ask for food or tasty treats.

What Your Dog Wants

During an introduction, a timid and lower-ranking dog will lower his head, avoid direct eye contact and gently extend his tongue to lick the muzzle of a more dominant, confident and higher-ranking dog. The first dog licks the muzzle of the second dog to simply reconfirm that he comes in peace. Think of this as the doggy equivalent of social kissing. Dogs who are already friends will also trade smooches. Two strongly bonded canine pals will lick and groom each other. They give each other “dog kisses” in displays of affection and friendship. In this scenario, the dogs’ social hierarchy is not an issue. These dogs know and trust each other. They also look out for each other: A dog who excessively licks the muzzle of his canine pal may be doing this because the dog has a tumor, cut or other medical need that requires attention and treatment.

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Does one of your dogs like your other one’s face? Do you wonder why dogs do this and if you should stop or manage it in some way?As a dog trainer I often coach clients on how to interpret and guide the interactions between multiple dogs in the household. Read on to find out everything about the peculiar doggy habit of licking each other’s faces!