Why Do Dogs Hate Vacuums?

Canine reactions to vacuums can range from entering attack-mode to running away in fear. Since vacuums are a necessary evil, the best way to help your dog tolerate cleanup day is to train him to make a positive association with his dust-sucking nemesis.

Add self-propelled cleaners to the scary equipment equation, and our dogs are forced to cope with yet another frightening household foe. Vacuums are unlike any other type of household equipment, and a single scary run-in can set the stage for a lifetime of fear.

Sure, hairdryers and mixers are similarly noisy, but they dont emerge from closets and take over the room the way vacuums do. Self-propelled cleaners, like Roombas, are especially frightening because they make noise, move unexpectedly, and appear and disappear without warning. Instead of forcing your dog to confront his fears when you bring out the vacuum, try putting him in a quiet room in a different part of the house and giving him something to keep him happily occupied.

Repeat this step a number of times, adding different types of movement so that it looks like actual vacuuming. It will probably take a series of training sessions spread out over a few weeks before your dog is comfortable with both the sound and movement of the vacuum. Youll know that your dog feels more comfortable with it when he exhibits the same Where are my goodies? response when the vacuum turns on.

How do I get my dog to not be afraid of the vacuum?

The Easy Solution: Try a Management Technique. A dog interactive toy, or “busy toy,” that dispenses dog treats or dog food kibbles, like the KONG Wobbler dog toy, gives him something to focus on other than the ruckus down the hall. Turning on a white noise machine or the television can also help to camouflage the noise.

Can a vacuum hurt a dog?

All vacuum cleaners can’t be used to vacuum-clean your dog. The suction power would ordinarily hurt your dog. Specifically created dog attachments can remove your dog’s hair without harming your dog in any way.

Why are dogs scared of brooms and vacuums?

Your dog may think a few nips on the broom will end this relationship the broom has with you. Although brooms do not make a noise like vacuums, they do represent an intrusion in the house. The broom is not around all the time and every time it arrives on the scene it is not part of friendly activities.

Why do animals hate vacuum?

Lack of exposure – Many pets are simply startled by this big, loud thing that emerges every so often to torment and chase them throughout the house (this is especially true for cats). … A pet who’s scared of loud noises, such as thunder or fireworks, may also find the vacuum cleaner frightening.

If you routinely procrastinate vacuuming for the sake of your dog, youre probably not alonethe machines are notorious for sending our pets into a tailspin.

If you got your dog from a backyard breeder, pet store or other questionable source, your dog may have never been exposed to a vacuum cleaner before. Reputable breeders, on the other hand, will make sure their puppies are exposed to a variety of household noises and stimuli before sending them to their new homes. This includes exposing the puppies to hair dryers, washing machines, vacuum cleaners and other loud appliances so they will feel more comfortable in their presence.

The terrorizing whirl of the motor; its almighty sucking strength; and fearsome reach of the hose. Do you really need to ask: Why are dogs afraid of vacuums?

Rather than letting your home become a mess of dirt and debris, implement the steps listed above to get your dog used to the vacuum so he doesnt run for cover every time it comes out of the closet.

Why Do Dogs Hate Vacuums?

It’s no surprise that many dogs are afraid of vacuums; they’re big, noisy and disruptive. Add self-propelled cleaners to the scary equipment equation, and our dogs are forced to cope with yet another frightening household foe.Vacuums are unlike any other type of household equipment, and a single scary run-in can set the stage for a lifetime of fear. Sure, hairdryers and mixers are similarly noisy, but they don’t emerge from closets and take over the room the way vacuums do.Self-propelled cleaners, like Roombas, are especially frightening because they make noise, move unexpectedly, and appear and disappear without warning.

The Easy Solution: Try a Management Technique

An easy way to help your dog cope with cleaning day is to manage his environment while you work.Instead of forcing your dog to confront his fears when you bring out the vacuum, try putting him in a quiet room in a different part of the house and giving him something to keep him happily occupied.A dog interactive toy, or “busy toy,” that dispenses dog treats or dog food kibbles, like the KONG Wobbler dog toy, gives him something to focus on other than the ruckus down the hall. Turning on a white noise machine or the television can also help to camouflage the noise.

Step 1: Establish a Positive Association

To start the training process, find a friend to help out and fill your pockets with small, meaty dog treats, like Blue Buffalo Blue Bits training dog treats.Bring your dog to a quiet room, and ask your helper to stand far enough away that your dog won’t be triggered when the vacuum appears. (Depending on your dog’s level of fear, it might be an adjacent hallway or even a different room.)Tell your helper to bring out the vacuum so that your dog can see it (keeping the vacuum turned off and still), then immediately start feeding your dog the small treats. Continue treating your dog for a few seconds, making sure that your dog can see the vacuum but maintains a relaxed posture. Then, have your helper remove the vacuum, and stop feeding your dog treats.Repeat the process several times, having your helper bring the vacuum into view and holding it still while you give your dog treats, then stopping the treats when it goes away. This first step helps your dog make a positive association with the vacuum, because when it appears, he gets goodies!After a bunch of repetitions, try a quick test: ask your helper to move the vacuum into your dog’s sightlines, as in the previous repetitions, and watch to see if your dog looks to you as if to say, “Where are my goodies?” That reaction means that your dog is starting to equate the vacuum with something positive!

Step 3: Desensitizing to the Vacuum Noise

The scariest part of vacuum training is turning it on, so make sure that your dog is happily orienting to you and taking treats with relaxed posture around a turned-off, moving vacuum before you try to flick the switch.Even if your dog is calmly tolerating the moving vacuum in the same room, you may want to turn the vacuum on in a different room or at a distance from your dog that is similar to when you began the training process. Ask your helper to start the vacuum for a few seconds, then feed your dog goodies while it’s on and stop when your helper turns it off.Watch your dog to make sure that the noise hasn’t derailed your progress. If your dog is unable to take treats when the vacuum turns on, it means that you’re too close to it; move farther away or shut the door between you and your helper when it’s turned it on.It will probably take a series of training sessions spread out over a few weeks before your dog is comfortable with both the sound and movement of the vacuum. Don’t rush this part of the training process!You’ll know that your dog feels more comfortable with it when he exhibits the same “Where are my goodies?” response when the vacuum turns on. At that point, you can begin moving it around and rewarding your dog, and then in subsequent sessions, start to bring it closer to your dog.