Why Do Dogs Eat Rabbit Poop?

Dogs are very curious and inquisitive creatures. They often seek to investigate new objects they find, usually will use their nose and mouth! This means dogs will commonly pick up various things around the house and garden. But what happens when your dog eats rabbit poop from your backyard?

By following these steps, youll be sure that your veterinarian has all the information they need, and that your pup will be in a good place to take whatever action your vet recommends . Step 2: Analyze Whats Been Consumed Try and work out roughly whats been eaten and make a note of the time.

You can treat them as normal, but if any symptoms of ill health develop then contact your local veterinary clinic for advice. In some cases your pup may pick up a bug or a parasite from eating rabbit feces.Rabbit poop can contain various nasty germs that can upset a dogs stomach. In the week after rabbit droppings are eaten, you might see your dog become lethargic, eat less, and have vomiting and diarrhea.

If any of these symptoms start after eating rabbit feces, make sure you contact your local veterinary clinic for advice. Bear in mind many of these infections are zoonoticthey can pass to people too, so take care over hygiene. If your dog is really struggling with vomiting and diarrhea or is not eating for more than a day or so, it is important to seek professional veterinary care.

Your veterinarian may suggest a blood test or imaging (ultrasound or X-ray) of the tummy if your dog is very sick, but in most cases, these will not be necessary. These might include a blood test, tummy imaging, or most likely a fecal sample sent to a lab to look for , , and worms . If rabbit poop and other interesting-smelling objects are a regular problematic habit, then one sensible option is to train your pup to accept a basket muzzle.

Giardia is thought to be a normal part of the life in a rabbits gut and does not typically cause them problems. But if Fido has pre-existing health conditions or if a large amount is poop is eaten, then it can cause illnesses in dogs.

Is it dangerous for dogs to eat rabbit poop?

Veterinarians will sometimes see evidence that a dog has been eating rabbit droppings by finding the parasite, coccidia, in the stool. The rabbit form of coccidia doesn’t cause harm to the dog and simply passes through the intestinal tract. There is a dog form of coccidia that can cause infection and then diarrhea.

Can dogs get roundworms from eating rabbit poop?

Puppies and dogs can also get roundworms from ingesting infective eggs in the environment or from eating infected mice, rabbits and earthworms. Once in the body, the eggs hatch releasinglarvae that can migrate throughout the liver and lungs, and eventually return to the intestines, where they grow into adults.

Why do dogs eat rabbit and deer poop?

Why do dogs eat deer poop? Dogs eat deer poop for a number of possible reasons including the coprophagia condition, lacking nutrients in their diet, due to anxiety or boredom, as learned behavior from other dogs, or they simply just like eating deer feces.

Can a dog get rabies from eating rabbit poop?

Some may think because rabies is so highly contagious, your dog could contract it just from eating the poop of an infected animal, but this is not possible. The rabies virus is contracted via saliva, so the transmission would actually require a bite or saliva from an infected animal getting in a wound.

Dogs will eat the most disgusting things, and that includes rabbit poop. While unpleasant, this behavior is common amongst canines. The technical term for it is coprophagia and is triggered by a number of factors.

If your dog is prone to eating rabbit poop, make sure theres enough fiber and complex B-vitamins in its diet. Puppies or dogs with a compromised Immune system should stay away from rabbit droppings altogether.

The good news is dogs are unlikely to be harmed by rabbit poop, especially if theyve only consumed a small amount. While most dogs wont display any symptoms after eating rabbit poop, some might react to the parasites found in feces. Parasites are common in rabbit feces and can be passed onto dogs through the consumption of infected pellets.

Not all rabbit droppings will be infected with harmful parasites, but its impossible to know until the dog displays symptoms. As described by VCA Hospitals , coccidiosis is an intestinal tract infection caused by a single-celled organism (a protozoan) called coccidia. Veterinarians can determine whether or not a dog has consumed rabbit feces by the presence of coccidia in the stool.

If your dog develops gastric sensitivity or diarrhea after eating rabbit droppings, get it checked out because something else more sinister might be to blame. However, diarrhea caused by giardia must be treated as quickly as possible; otherwise, serious gastric inflammation, weight loss, or a severe lack of appetite can occur and make the canine extremely unwell. The MSD Veterinary Manual describes Leptospirosis as an infectious disease caused by a type of bacteria called Leptospira.

Dogs are most commonly affected and can develop the disease after coming into contact with infected rabbit feces. Fever Shivering Muscle tenderness Stiffness or reluctance to move Increased thirst Either frequent or reduced urination Dehydration Vomiting Loss of appetite Jaundice Lethargy Painful inflammation of the eyes Dogs that lack fiber or B-complex vitamins in their diet are more likely to ingest rabbit poop to get these essential nutrients into their body.

Therefore, you must feed your dog a diet rich in fiber and B vitamins to give it the nutrients its needs and prevent it from consuming rabbit droppings. VCA Hospitals explains that this organ serves as a secondary olfactory system specifically designed for chemical communication. If your dog is hungry or greedy, it will eat anything that smells even remotely edible including rabbit droppings.

If your dog enjoys the taste of rabbit feces, it will seek droppings out more regularly as a tasty snack. However, some medical conditions, such as liver disease, parasites, and anemia, cause dogs to consume rabbit feces. If the problem persists, seek veterinary help for advice on how to treat your dog with alternative methods.

The best way for your dog to avoid nasty parasites and infections from rabbit poop is to stop eating it. Not only will your dog be less tempted to eat the rabbit droppings it finds, but it already has the nutrients it needs, reducing the need to consume them altogether. Your dog will begin to associate the horrible taste and smell with the rabbit feces and, as a result, will avoid poop completely.

This learned behavior should break the habit, as your dog wont want to risk eating something it doesnt like. The next time your dog looks ready to chew on some newly-found rabbit dropping, shout leave it. Your pet should simply walk away. If your yard is home to rabbit poop, aside from clearing it up every time it appears, you can distract your dog with games and puzzles that offer mental and physical stimulation.

If your dog continues to consume rabbit poop even after implementing these measures, you might have no choice but to place a muzzle on your pet especially if feces make it unwell. If youve recently bathed your pet with a fragranced shampoo, rolling in rabbit poo is its way to hide the scent. Keep your dog on a short leash to prevent it from roaming into grassy areas where rabbit droppings are present.

Let the shampoo sink in for ten minutes or so and add orange peel to the bath water, which helps to break down the grease.

If you’re a dog owner and live in an area with lots of wild rabbits, chances are high your dog will eventually encounter rabbit poop. Rabbits eat continuously throughout the day, so they also tend to poo frequently.

It happens so quickly: One moment your dog is sniffing some grass, and the next he’s eating rabbit poop like there’s no tomorrow. Because they are so easily ingested by bunnies, cecatropes usually aren’t left around long enough for a dog to time them.

If your dog remains lethargic for more than a few hours, still refuses food, and/or vomits any blood, take them to the vet right away. Other types of parasites, including coccidia, giardia, and cryptosporidia, can affect animals. However, these parasites are “species specific,” according to veterinarians, and should not cause any symptoms in either dogs or cats.

Rabbit poop is one of the richest sources not only of digestive enzymes, but also B vitamins,” says veterinarian Karen Becker . Normally the leave it and drop it command works wonders to stop a dog in his tracks from eating something potentially dangerous, but it takes a really sharp eye to catch a dog before he wolfs down those small pellets! Your best option therefore remains erecting some type of fencing or barrier that prevent rabbits from entering your yard.

It is not meant to substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, or formal and individualized advice from a veterinary medical professional. Answer: Most likely, digestive issues will follow if your dog ate a whole lot. You may need to install chicken wire and make sure that it is at least 2 feet high to prevent the rabbits from jumping and buried 3 to 6 inches deep.

Our dachshund has gotten sick 5 times within the last 3 months from eating our bunny’s pellets. We try to be as diligent as we possibly can and have moved the bunny to a different room and gated the door, so hopefully this doesn’t happen because it can add up going to the vet! My 6 month old puppy just came back from the vet with bad bacteria in her tummy, could be rabbit poop, could be wood she chews on, could be anything.

Fast Balance (strong probiotic), Bland Diet, Pumpkin, and Slippery Elm. I have two pet rabbits and no matter what I do I cant seem to stop them from eating the poop straight out of the cage (theres a small gap where poop gets lodged, they eat it where the tray pulls out and whatever gets kicked out) I have three dogs, all mixed breeds but all between 30 and 50 lbs and they’ve never had an issue, not to say that wild rabbits poop might have more cause for harm than domestic since I control their environment and have far less exposure to potential parasites This family of rabbits live under my shed so when Penny isn’t feeling well this is usually the reason.

We have a lab/ shepard mix an she eats rabbit poop all the time, she has never gotten sick and her appetite has not changed . With a more serious case, your dog can be hospitalized for pancreatitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Diarrhea Syndrome (AHDS). We were told to bring in a sample of his feces which was first tested to see if he was infected by parasites (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm) or other organisms such as coccidia.

Additionally, this organism and the sickness that can occur is zoonotic, it can be passed from animal to human and vice versa. Panacur (a milky white substance dispensed via a syringe once a day) and Metronidazole (which in higher doses can cause neurological disturbances that require hospitalization). She gave us a feces sample kit and a prescription for Metronidazole, put Winston on an IV of fluids and Cerenia, then sent us home.

Winston was put on double the Metronidazole, Panacur was added, we continued his bland diet. Again he was put on an IV of fluids and Cerenia and the vet drew blood for a full chem profile. Due to the giardia, then the insufficient first course of antibiotics, to the doubling of the Metronidazole and adding the Panacur, his GI system is a mess.

We called our usual vet and she ordered Science Diet, Tylan Powder, and oral Cerenia. Long and short, from our experience, giardia is dangerous for dogs (and potentially humans). With over $700.00 dollars in vet bills, but more importantly, Winston being sick for about a month, we do not take lightly the consumption of rabbit feces.

I have started to research ways to boost Winstons GI health to better fight against giardia. Our vet told us we could give him Panacur for five days each month to fight against it, but Im not sure thats the best choice. Weve learned that giardia is a potentially life threatening organism that lives innocuously enough in a poop that dogs seem to be wild about.

I am finding that one of them has lost weight since the rabbit have started to come into our yard, about a year ago. It does worry me and I wish I could find a way to stop them eating the poo or get rid of the rabbits! Im thinking of buying a muzzle so at least he can sit outside and enjoy the grass in the sun without being tempted by the rabbit poop.

He ate his dinner but that evening he had awful diarrhea and threw up once the next morning. My toy poodle, 18 months old now, ate a bunch of rabbit poop and then vomited it! my dog got sick eating rabbit poop the next day after ingesting dark pellets with vomiting and red diahrrea, only drink water for the next 24 hours.

He had horrible diarrhea, vomiting (with rabbit poop in it) and now excessive drooling and now he’s very tired . I think the reason was because he has a sensitive stomach and has certain food allergies (such as wheat) and probably had an allergic reaction to the poop (just a guess). My dog who only has free reign when in my huge fenced backyard had worms at her last annual checkup.

Yes, our dog (14 mo old cocker) eats rabbit droppings and has developed coccidiosis three times in the past few months. Called vet, suggested we give her pepcid AC or pepto and watch her closely. They have all been snacking on rabbit poop (unbeknownst to me) Until my 14.5 year old Eskimo became violently ill with HGE and Pancreatitis last weekend.

The day before she was discharged, my 13 year old Eskimo was “off” and by Tuesday also violently sick, vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Pat thanks for sharing your comment about your dog who got coccidia from eating rabbit poop, I hope he gets better soon! Our Border collie/ Blue heeler mix is also a great fan of the bunny poop feast!

We thought it was allergies, even tried going to a less ingredient food- less than what he is already on, was also going to bring him in to get checked out, but then did some researching and realized it was probably from the buffet outside. We started watching him and since he doesn’t get to eat it anymore, he’s back to normal, all symptoms have disappeared. Ony thing that comes to mind is to fence off an area so that it is rabbit proof.

My puppy eats it like crazy, we are having such trouble potty training him because he sees outside as a bunny poo buffet. My Doxies scarf it down before I can stop them…it’s making my younger one vomit a very disgusting, foul smelling substance. I know that daushounds we’re bred to hunt rabbits so I didn’t think the poop could be fatal since they probably used to eat a ton of it.

I have heard good things about 1 inch mesh chicken wire slightly buried at the bottom to prevent digging under. You’ll need to consider the risks of him getting dehydrated since he’s a small fellow, I would play it safe and see the vet. Fortunately, my dogs like yours have scarfed down those pellets for some time, and so far they’re healthy and never gave signs of illness.

My dog has gotten sick twice in the last month, with major diarrhea and a bit of vomiting. He went to the vet, had a fecal test, blood panel, and x-ray and they could find no problem, but gave me meds for the diarrhea. I can’t say for certain if its related, but I do remember seeing him eating rabbit poop a few days before he got sick the first time.

My Shih Tzu ate some rabbit poop and started vomiting up so white foamy stuff from his mouth. We will be walking through our normal field and turn around to see my chiweenie doing the “inchy shuffle,” grazing on rabbit poo she seems to be more than capable of sniffing out. We have bunnies living under our deck and my golden eats the poop by the truck loads.

The best option may be to cut grass and fence off the area with chicken wire that have spaces of 1 inch or less. He needed to be treated with oral antibiotics due to soft stools with mucous and inappropriate weight gain. HGE stands for Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, according to VCA Animal Hospitals:” it can arise from dietary indiscretion (ingesting non-food items or even dramatically different foods than what the dog is accustomed to)” and lists several other potential causes such as immune-mediated disease, toxins, pancreatitis, stress, anxiety, hyperactivity, intestinal parasites, bacteria, poor diet, new treats etc.

My puppies also wanted to eat it all the time which is why I was forced to keep them on leash when outdoors until they did great with the leave it command. My 3 1/2 month old puppy has developed quite a taste for rabbit poop and here I am up all night because he has d,iarrhea from hell. Read under the bad and the ugly where a link to a vet discusses the risks for giardia and other parasites.

While there are many dog foods who claim to add them, consider that a great percentage of them are lost in the packing /storing process.

This is a common complaint that I hear from pet owners! It is important to note that eating rabbit droppings does not mean that your dog has a dietary deficiency; its just a gross habit. In addition, the types of parasites that rabbits can pass in their stool, do not cause infections in dogs.

Yes, the same bubonic plaque that wiped out 30 to 50 percent of the population of Europe in the 14th century thus causing a massive labor shortage and changing the economic and political structure of modern societies permanently!

Why Do Dogs Eat Rabbit Droppings?

To a dog, the poop of another animalThere are the smells of the content itself, its bacterial life, and the smells of the rabbit to explore. It even

Can Rabbit Droppings Make My Dog Sick?

Rabbit droppings are largelyRabbit droppings can in some cases containsWhile most dogs will not have a problem after eating rabbit droppings,Eating rabbit feces isn’t the end of the world for your pup, but

My Dog Ate Rabbit Poop: What Now?

If Fido just recently ate some rabbit feces, there are a few steps you can take. By following these steps, you’ll be sure that your veterinarian has all the information they need, and that your pup will be in a good place to

Step 2: Analyze What’s Been Consumed

Try and work out roughly what’s been eaten and make a note of the time. For example, it is useful to know if it is

Step 3: Call Your Veterinarian

Follow the advice of the veterinary clinic. They may advise you to continue managing your dog at home. But if the symptoms are concerning, or if your dog has pre-existing health conditions like a sensitive tummy, then the

Step 4: Follow Your Vet’s Advice

Monitor your canine companion closely over the following 24 hours. You can treat them as normal, but if any symptoms of ill health develop then

What Happens Next?

Rabbit poopIn general, the tummy upsets associated with rabbit droppings are likely to be short-lived. Your pup will likely be ill only for a few short days. Most dogs will recover without trouble. That said, some of the bugs and parasites in rabbit fecesThese infections are rare and are not associated regularly with rabbits, but theoretically

How Will The Vet Treat My Dog?

In most cases, your dog willIf your dog is reallyTypically, if a dog isYour veterinarian mayIf a dog is showing signs of longer-term, chronic issues, then your veterinarian may recommend investigations. These might include aThe vast majority of these infections from rabbit feces are manageable and treatable. But they all require different specific treatments, so an accurate diagnosis is essential.

Preventing Rabbit Feces Ingestion

If rabbit poop and other interesting-smelling objects are a regular problematic habit, then one sensible option is toIf wild rabbit droppings is the issue, then it may be worth looking forIf pet rabbit droppings are the issue, it may be worth trying to separate the living spaces of your rabbit and your pup. This will help to keep the rabbit feces away from your curious canine. If you live in the countryside and wild rabbits are in your yard, you may need to look through your yard before letting Fido outside.

Are There Parasites in Rabbit Poop?

There are two types of rabbit droppings. The first is normal fecal droppings, which are hard, round pellets of indigestible fiber. These are the fecal pellets you’re most likely to find in a rabbit’s hutch.The second isBut are rabbit feces considered toxic? The good news is dogs are unlikely to be harmed by rabbit poop, especially if they’ve only consumed a small amount.As rabbit poop is mostly undigested grass and hay, little damage is likely to occur after consumption. However, parasites in a rabbit’s feces can cause sickness – more on this below.While most dogs won’t display any symptoms after eating rabbit poop, some might react to the parasites found in feces. After your dog has consumed poop, look out for the following:If the symptoms appear severe or get worse over time, seek veterinary treatment.

Coccidia

As described byVeterinarians can determine whether or not a dog has consumed rabbit feces by the presence of coccidia in the stool. However, the rabbit form of coccidia doesn’t harm dogs. Instead, it passes through the intestinal tract and comes out through the feces.If your dog develops gastric sensitivity or diarrhea after eating rabbit droppings, get it checked out because something else more sinister might be to blame.

Giardia

Giardia is a tiny parasite that causes giardiasis, which is a diarrheal illness. Once the parasite gets inside the dog’s system, it causes frothy, greasy, foul-smelling diarrhea. You may also see traces of mucus in the dog’s poop.The disease isn’t usually fatal unless the dog’s immune system is young or weak. However, diarrhea caused by giardia must be treated as quickly as possible; otherwise, serious gastric inflammation, weight loss, or a severe lack of appetite can occur and make the canine extremely unwell.Treatment for giardiasis varies, but infected dogs are usually given oral medication. All dog toys and bedding must be washed to remove traces of the parasite.

Why Do Dogs Like Rabbit Poop?

TheHowever, Leptospirosis is more easily transmitted through urine. If a rabbit urinates at the same time as defecating, Leptospirosis is more likely to work its way into a dog’s system.Some dogs don’t show any signs of illness, while others develop the following:Leptospirosis can be treated with antibiotics. However, if left untreated, the disease can lead to kidney or liver damage. Annual vaccinations are available and can protect dogs for up to 12 months.

Nutritional Deficiencies

Dogs that lack fiber or B-complex vitamins in their diet are more likely to ingest rabbit poop to get these essential nutrients into their body.While rabbits eat cecotropes, they leave their feces alone. This is because they already eat enough fiber through grass, hay, and alfalfa.Rabbit poop also contains many digestive enzymes that come from a rabbit’s stomach. These enzymes aid with digestion, which many dogs on a kibble-only diet lack.Therefore, you must feed your dog a diet rich in fiber and B vitamins to give it the nutrients its needs and prevent it from consuming rabbit droppings.

Curiosity

Your dog doesn’t need a nutritional deficiency as an excuse to eat rabbit feces. Dogs use their advanced sense of smell and taste to detect new and unfamiliar things. Eating gross things, like poop, is their way to ascertain what it is they have discovered.As described byThey also have an extra smelling organ in their mouths called the Jacobsen’s organ.Unfortunately, this means that dogs often eat things that are bad for them before their owners get a chance to stop them.

Hunger

Dogs are driven by their basic instincts. One of these includes hunger. If your dog is hungry or greedy, it will eat anything that smells even remotely edible – including rabbit droppings.Heading on walkies before your dog has had a meal with fuel this desire to eat. If your dog enjoys the taste of rabbit feces, it will seek droppings out more regularly as a tasty snack.

Provide A Nutritious Diet

Pica is a condition that causes dogs to eat non-food substances. Coprophagy is the technical term for the consumption of feces and is one of the most common forms of pica.Pica usually develops because of behavioral issues. However, some medical conditions, such as liver disease, parasites, and anemia, cause dogs to consume rabbit feces. Common reasons for pica include:As a compulsive condition, pica requires on-going treatment. Relapses are also common. The following steps can be taken to help prevent pica:If the problem persists, seek veterinary help for advice on how to treat your dog with alternative methods.

Hide the Taste

You can stop your dog from eating rabbit poop every time you catch your pet about to do so. However, long term, it’s more effective to put your dog off eating the feces.To do so, place something your dog hates the taste of on the rabbit droppings you find. This could be a hot sauce or something similar. Just make sure the food is safe for dogs to eat.Your dog will begin to associate the horrible taste and smell with the rabbit feces and, as a result, will avoid poop completely. This learned behavior should break the habit, as your dog won’t want to risk eating something it doesn’t like.

Teach “Leave It”

If your dog doesn’t already know it, teach it to understand the command “leave it.” This is an effective way to stop your dog from eating rabbit feces.To do so, first find an empty room with no distractions. Grab a tasty treat, and then show your dog what you’re holding to grab its attention. Allow your dog to have a sniff of the treat while keeping it covered and firmly say, “leave it.”Once your dog stops sniffing, reward it with the treat. The next stage is to repeat the process while leaving your hand open. Every time your dog leaves the treat alone, reward it.Practice this with other things around the house that you need your dog to leave, and in time, it will recognize the command.The next time your dog looks ready to chew on some newly-found rabbit dropping, shout “leave it.” Your pet should simply walk away.

Distract Your Dog

If your yard is home to rabbit poop, aside from clearing it up every time it appears, you can distract your dog with games and puzzles that offer mental and physical stimulation.Your dog will be so busy having fun, it won’t notice the camouflaged rabbit feces in the grass. It also means you can leave your dog in the yard without having to worry.Tired dogs are also less likely to look for rabbit feces. Therefore, wear your pet out before it gets a chance to go looking for poop to eat.If your dog continues to consume rabbit poop even after implementing these measures, you might have no choice but to place a muzzle on your pet – especially if feces make it unwell.

My Dog Keeps Rolling in Rabbit Poop

As well as eating rabbit poop, your dog might be partial to rolling in it, too. While it seems strange that dogs would want to cover themselves in unbearable smells, the reality is that what smells horrible to you might smell pleasant to your dog – and vice versa.There are many reasons why a dog might do this. The first is that this behavior stems from when dogs lived in the wild as predators. They would roll in rabbit poop to hide their scent from their prey, allowing them to go in for the kill.Similarly, because dogs are pack animals, it’s possible they roll in rabbit poop to tell the rest of their pack where they’ve been and what they’ve found. You are part of your pet’s pack and your dog is therefore keen to share its adventures with you.When dogs roll in rabbit poop, they might also be leaving their scent behind as a mark-making behavior. This is to let other animals know that the rabbit droppings belong to the dog leaving its scent.Also, dogs don’t enjoy smelling too clean. If you’ve recently bathed your pet with a fragranced shampoo, rolling in rabbit poo is its way to hide the scent.

What Makes Rabbit Poop Irresistible?

It happens so quickly: One moment your dog is sniffing some grass, and the next he’s eating rabbit poop like there’s no tomorrow. What gives?If you’re a dog owner and live in an area with lots of wild rabbits, chances are high your dog will eventually encounter rabbit poop. Rabbits eat continuously throughout the day, so they also tend to poo frequently.

What About Parasites?

It’s a myth that dogs can get tapeworm from eating rabbit poop. According to VCA animal hospitals, tapeworm can only establish in a dog’s body if the dog eats the actual rabbit. It’s not unusual for dogs who eat rabbit poop to also eat any dead rabbits found on the property if they are let outdoors unsupervised.Another factor to consider is that dogs more commonly get tapeworms from eating infected fleas. Rabbits, just like dogs, can have fleas. So if there are fleas in your dog’s environment, they can be the cause for your dog’s tapeworm infestation.However, if you are concerned, it may be helpful to know that the passage of tapeworm segments in dogs who eat rodents or rabbits can be seen in the dog’s feces between six to eight weeks after consumption.Other types of parasites, including coccidia, giardia, and cryptosporidia, can affect animals. However, these parasites are “species specific,” according to veterinarians, and should not cause any symptoms in either dogs or cats.”Rabbit form of coccidia is not the same type of coccidia that can affect dogs, and it just simply passes through the dogs body, explains veterinarian Dr. Ivana Vukasinovic. The rabbit form of coccidia derives usually from the genus Eimeria, while the dog form is from the genus Isospora.Coccidia may be present in the dog’s stools during a fecal flotation test, but this doesn’t mean that the dog is infected or that the coccidia from the rabbit are reproducing in the dog.Dogs are therefore more likely to get the type of coccidia that triggers illness by swallowing contaminated soil, water or foods contaminated with coccidia oocysts rather than from the ingestion of rabbit poop.

How Can I Stop This Behavior?

Normally the leave it and drop it command works wonders to stop a dog in his tracks from eating something potentially dangerous, but it takes a really sharp eye to catch a dog before he wolfs down those small pellets! And of course, it may be impractical if you leave Rover in the yard unattended for any period of time,Your best option therefore remains erecting some type of fencing or barrier that prevent rabbits from entering your yard.