Why Do Dogs Dig in Blankets?

If you have a dog at home, youve likely noticed theyve got some strange bedtime ritualslike turning in a circle a dozen times before settling down or snuggling up with their favorite blanket. You may have even noticed your favorite pup scratching and digging at their beds (you may even have a pile of dog bed stuffing on your floor as proof!).

Digging became a way for dogs living in areas with particularly cold or wet weather to find protection against their environment. To mark territory Like cats and many other four-legged creatures, dogs have scent glands on the bottom of their feet, which secrete a distinct pheromone.

If they think theres something exciting hiding under the cushions of their bed, like some leftover food or a toy, they might dig as a way of uncovering it.

Why does my dog dig at her blanket?

Bed-scratching can be territorial behaviour. Dogs are naturally driven to mark their territory. … Dogs have glands in their paws that leave a distinctive scent on bedding or other objects whenever they scratch. You may only see a tattered blanket, but your dog may see and smell a space that he has made his own.

Why do dogs scratch blankets before lying down?

Scratching the ground before settling into bed is another ritual you might have noticed your dog doing. … Scratching the ground is away to spread their scent and mark their territory, communicating to other dogs or animals that this is their nest or place of rest.

Why do dogs dig on beds and couches?

Dogs will dig to warm up their beds in the wild or to find a more comfortable sleeping position, much like how humans fluff their pillows before sleeping. Sometimes, dogs will dig on furniture out of boredom. They may not have enough toys or enough exercise going on in their daily lives to occupy themselves.

How do I stop my dog from digging my blanket?

Your dog may dig his bedding when he is too warm, so always be aware of the indoor temperature. To help increase your dog’s comfort, cool your home to a temperature that is comfortable for your dog using air conditioning or fans. To learn more about digging behavior in dogs, go to How to Stop a Dog from Digging.

Your new puppy has captured your heart. Youve invested time and money into your new pet, and that includes spending hours shopping for the best dog beds on the market. Two days after introducing your pup to the adorable, lacy bed with its pink canopy, the expensive piece of pet furniture is in tatters. Why do dogs scratch their beds with their constant digging and scratching? Read on to find out!

Burrowing under leaves and dirt could create a warmer or cooler space where dogs could escape the harsh weather and extreme temperatures. Our latest addition, the Ultimate Dog Bed , is made from the same 1680D polyester that can handle restless paws and teeth with ease, and stay in one piece for years to come.

At best, dog behavior can seem just a little odd to the rest of us humans; among these odd behaviors, you mightve spotted your beloved furry companion doing their scratching-ritual before picking a suitable place to nap.

Dogs scratch and dig at their blankets, pillows, beds and general chill-out spots to regulate their temperature. Dogs know this, and one theory is that this behavior is a throwback to more ancient times before their domestication, when the temperature was a lot more crucial to their survival.

This is their way of letting other animals know that this is their territory, and the same is true when they give their beds a couple casual scratches. Youve seen it before: Your dog gives the bedding a scratch or two before turning around a couple of times. Its a common theory that they do this for camouflage another proposed throwback to your dogs ancient behaviors.

If your dog is digging at the bed, he may be trying to hide some especially sweet booty (hes not likely to get very deep, but bless his heart for trying)! If you cant find the source of the problem, a visit to the vet might be in order to track down the root cause. Need to stop your dog from scratching at your new leather couches or digging a hole in your wooden floor?

(b) If your dogs scratching is becoming excessively destructive, one tip we found is to always keep their nails trimmed .

Weve all been there. Your beautiful yard has become a minefield of holes, your couch pillows and blankets are carelessly strewn about every day, andyour dog is the culprit. Lets answer the question, Why do dogs dig?, and learn how to stop your dog from digging up the yard, the carpet, or the bed. We promise that once you understand their reasoning youll have a better idea of how to deal with your mischievous canine buddies.

Yorkies caught vermin in mines and clothing mills and Dachshunds were renowned badger hunters. Lastly, northern breeds like Huskies and Malamutes often dig in order to find cooler spaces below the surface.

When it comes to this topic, we also cant rule out the fact that some dogs just find digging to be an entertaining way to pass the time. This instinct is based on the need to provide a safe space to house and raise puppies and to protect themselves from predators and harsh, outdoor elements. Northern breeds like Huskies, in particular, are instinctively inclined to seek cooler temps when the weather warms up.

Typically, their favorite digging spots are in shaded, cool areas (like underneath trees or patio furniture). This helpful article goes more in-depth about training your dog to stop digging, but heres a list of basic and straightforward options for starting out. Discourage them from digging with the help of buried rocks, smells they dont enjoy, or an automatic sprinkler (thatll teach em!)

We know its frustrating, but since its such an instinctual, natural behavior its important to be patient with your furry best friend especially with those breeds who are most prone to playing in the dirt.

Digging due to boredom

There are many reasons that dogs dig, but it seems best to start with the basis of it all—evolution. It’s in every dog’s DNA to dig, though there are certain breeds that are even more inclined to putter around in the dirt than others. Mini Schnauzers, Yorkshire Terriers, and Dachshunds are especially adept at making your yard look extra holey (good thing they have such adorable faces).Why these breeds in particular? All of them were used to hunt animals for food and pest control. Yorkies caught vermin in mines and clothing mills and Dachshunds were renowned badger hunters. Other hunting dogs like small hounds also have digging in their blood, so if there are any enticing small animals in your yard (gophers, mice, etc.) they’re bound to keep searching for them, regardless of the damage they might cause to your landscaping.More “primitive breeds,” like the Chow Chow, retain their self-preservation instincts strongly, which leads to digging for safety and shelter. Lastly, northern breeds like Huskies and Malamutes often dig in order to find cooler spaces below the surface. This instinctual behavior is amplified by general high energy and working instincts.Other breeds prone to digging include:

Digging by instinct

Another huge reason that dogs dig is their inescapable desire to create a safe shelter or home. This instinct is based on the need to provide a safe space to house and raise puppies and to protect themselves from predators and harsh, outdoor elements. Female dogs are often more prone to “denning” since, back in the wild, they were generally the ones preparing dens for their pups.Dogs also want to sleep in a comfy place (just like us!), but instead of buying that extra foam-top mattress, they like to dig. Outside, that means turning up dirt to make it soft and well-suited for their bodies. Inside, they toss around pillows and blankets to make their spaces more suitable. It’s like us fluffing our pillows before turning in.Another reason your pup might be digging? Temperature regulation. Northern breeds like Huskies, in particular, are instinctively inclined to seek cooler temps when the weather warms up. If they can’t take a quick dip in a pool to cool off, they might try to dig and find a nice place to hang out. The soil beneath the surface is cooler, after all. Typically, their favorite digging spots are in shaded, cool areas (like underneath trees or patio furniture).