Why Do Cats Wag Their Tails While Sleeping?

Why do cats wag their tails? You might be surprised to learn that tail wagging is very different for cats than for dogs. Cats may flick their tails while walking, thump their tails while lying down or hold their tails up high when they see youcats have a unique body language all their own. But if you do a little research and pay close attention to your cat, you can soon learn exactly what your cat is trying to say each time he wags his tail.

Your cat might swish her tail in a similar manner if she’s hunting a bug in your house and about to channel her inner tiger as she dashes to her prize. When a cat feels threatened or is unexpectedly startled, he will puff up his tail until it’s twice its normal width or even larger.

When your cat is feeling happy and confident, she’ll walk around your home with her tail held high, pointing straight to the sky. The diffuser helps reduce stress, allowing your cat to feel calmer and more relaxed.

While watching our cat snooze, we noticed his tail was tapping away like he was enjoying a disco medley we couldnt hear, sending quite a mixed signal.

You have to take the whole body into account when reading tail signals, says Carlo Siracusa , of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. The napping cat with the tapping tail, for example, is relaxed overall but paying attention to something happening around him, a sound or movement, so hes peaceful but hardly asleep on the job.

A whipping tale on an alert cat can mean nervousness, potential aggression, and Do not touch! says Siracusa. Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo ArkPlease be respectful of copyright. A downward curve can mean defensiveness, says Siracusa, while a relaxed cat will carry his tail in a neutral or low position.

These cats may be going through the motions, and bringing back a prey facsimile, to their territory, often near their food bowls. Females bring prey back to provision or teach kittens but males do this kind of thieving as well.

Dr Carlo Siracusa, an assistant professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told National Geographic that in order to read cat tail signals, you have to pay attention to their whole body, and not just their tails.

Dogs tend to be fairly good at telling their owners what they want, compared to cats, who are notoriously difficult to read. But veterinary experts say that paying attention to a cat’s tail movements can help reveal their mood or intentions.

A cat with a whipping tail can mean it’s on alert, nervous or potentially aggressive, and should not be touched Whipping tail: This can mean that the cat is on alert, nervous or potentially aggressive, and should not be touched. Tail in a low, neutral position : This is a sign of a relaxed cat Cat suddenly bolts : This energy, called ‘the zoomies,’ is probably an outlet for accumulated frustration, fear or energy that might have been used for catching prey.

For example, if a cat appears to be sleeping but is tapping its tail, it could be ‘relaxed overall but paying attention to something around him, a sound or movement,’ said Dr Siracusa. A cat with a whipping tail can mean it’s on alert, nervous or potentially aggressive, and should not be touched. Cats that are afraid of something tend to have an arched back and tail up and puffed.

Cats need stimulation and would be chasing prey and climbing up trees if they mostly spent time outside, said Dr Siracusa. Dr Nick Dodman, a professor of behavioral pharmacology and animal behavior at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, told National Geographic that cats are hunters and ‘speed merchants’. He agrees with Dr Siracusa that these ‘zoomies’ could be pent-up energy that cats might have used for catching prey.

In addition, cats are crepuscular, a term which refers to animals that are mainly active during twilight (immediately after dawn and just before dusk). Cats are crepuscular, a term referring to animals that are mainly active during twilight (immediately after dawn and just before dusk). Cases of sticky-pawed cats have been documented across the world, for example Brigit, a six-year-old tonkinese cat from Hamilton, New Zealand, who every night and often steals men’s underwear and socks on neighborhood clothing lines and places them on her owner Sarah Nathan’s bed in a proud display, according to the New Zealand Herald .

Females bring prey back to provide for their kittens and teach them, but males also exhibit thieving behavior too.

Cats May Wag Their Tails When Hunting

Cats also wag their tails when they’re hunting. Sometimes this looks more like an energetic swish or even a persistent thump. This often happens when she’s watching birds out the window and becomes very focused on her prey.

WHAT YOUR CAT IS TELLING YOU

It’s no secret: Cats tend to be more mysterious in their behaviors than dogs.Dogs tend to be fairly good at telling their owners what they want, compared to cats, who are notoriously difficult to read.But veterinary experts say that paying attention to a cat’s tail movements can help reveal their mood or intentions.Scroll down for videoA cat with a whipping tail can mean it’s on alert, nervous or potentially aggressive, and should not be touchedDr Carlo Siracusa, an assistant professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, told National Geographic that in order to read cat tail signals, you have to pay attention to their whole body, and not just their tails.