Why Do Cats Touch Noses?

Cats are fascinating to watch. Everything a cat does is deliberate. Felines do not take action for the sake of it. The purposeful nature of a cats ways is especially evident in how they communicate. In fact, some experts argue that everything a cat does is a form of communication. Most people associate cat communication with meows. However, most of their communication is nonverbal.

This means that cats cannot afford to be overly verbal, as it will blow their cover, resulting in a missed meal. This is because a solitary predator relies on itself to survive, meaning that any injury can be a death sentence, as it will be unable to hunt.

Why does my cat like touching her nose to mine?

Your cat treats you like you are just a part of its cat family and so it comes to touch your nose just like would do to other of its members. Your cat will love you even if we humans are unknown to them. They come to touch your nose just out of love and affection.

Do cats kiss with their nose?

Wet nose kisses are a wonderful sign of affection. Sure, there’s some initial sniffing involved for identification purposes, but this says you’re someone the cat likes. If the cat really likes you, he may punctuate the nose kiss with a gentle love nip.

What does a cat Boop mean?

boop me! Cat-to-cat, it is a greeting that conveys immense trust. It’s like the open hand humans extend to say, “I have no weapon.” After all, in Cat World, a face coming at you can mean very big trouble. … In many ways, this affection move is the final frontier to cat closeness.

Even though cats do not communicate with one another like us, their communication methods are highly developed and sophisticated. Interestingly, cats communicate a lot of information based on their sense of smell. As a result, cats often touch noses with one another to express some sort of information.

Image Credit: rihaij, Pixabay Cats can communicate their breeding capability, sex, age, and social hierarchy through something called pheromones . Cats often use pheromones to claim their territory by rubbing their faces on items.

If the act is not accompanied with aggressive behavior and the cats are really taking the time to smell one another, they likely are just greeting each other. Image Credit: Andreas Lischka, PixabaySometimes, cats touch noses not as a greeting, but to learn where they have been . More so, the nose touches are likely to smell where the other has been if one of the cats have ventured off to new areas recently.

It doesnt take a rocket scientist to notice when a nose touch asserts dominance. Dominance smelling is accompanied with aggressive behavior, stiff motions, and an overall uneasy feeling. For example, house cats that live together may do this to claim territory over a favorite treat or food bowl.

Even though it may sound a bit strange, cats can learn a lot of information about one another by smelling the others nose.

When you draw a cat, there are a few things that you never forget, and one of them is her little nose. This nose, of course, takes responsibility for the sense of smell, but do you know that touching it has many meanings depending on each part of a cats life? Why do cats touch noses? This is the topic today.

If you want to know how a cat feels at a certain time, try to pay special attention to any parts of her body. For example, a cat with a high tail, tall body, and turned ears forwards is feeling friendly and confident.

A piece of the evidence showed is that domesticated housecats meow a lot more than feral cats. In this case, the unopened eyes cannot help the cat to identify her mother, so a nose touch between two of them can be an action to show their affection. In addition, newborn cats can use their noses to belly up to the milk bar as it is the most developed sense of them at that time.

In most cases, a touch nose from your cat as a type of cross-species communication is not really a sign of affection. They touch noses to show the sign of friendship, but at the same time, they share their scent glands on the heads and cheeks as a territorial mark.

Cats nose poke (gently touch their nose to the others nose) only trusted friends, be they feline, human, canine, or equine. A nose poke leaves the cat vulnerable as he must be close to the other entity to do it, therefore it is offered sparingly and only to the best of friends. Behaviorists vary on ideas as to why cats do this. Some suggest its related to the cats scent glands; scent glands release scent when rubbed and the nose poke is a gentle touch.

In a low spot the cat could be disturbed by the family dog, children, or even the evil vacuum cleaner. It usually occurs when the cat is being petted on a lap or in your bed as the kneading is associated with feelings of warmth and comfort.

Some cats as they knead will also suck on a piece of fabric (blanket or your shirt or sweater). Hell be playing, grabbing with his teeth and front paws, and then will begin kicking ferociously with his back legs. Liz shares her home with three English Shepherds: Bones, Hero, and Seven, as well as one confident and bossy orange tabby cat, Kirk.

Greeting

Cats learn how to touch noses when they are kittens. Mama cat usually greets her blind and deaf kittens by touching their noses with hers. This action allows her to pass her scent to them so that they can recognize her even before their eyes open.As such, cats grow up knowing that touching noses is one way of greeting one another. This method is typically reserved for familiar faces.You will also notice that your cat sometimes bumps its nose against yours. The reason is still the same; they are simply greeting you. Therefore, never bypass a chance to touch noses with your kitty.

Warning

However, unfamiliar cats can also touch noses. This usually happens if none of them is encroaching on the other’s territory. As mentioned, cats will do all they can to avoid unnecessary fights. Like politicians, they use tact.This will involve approaching each other cautiously and then extending their noses to greet one another. Since each party is in a vulnerable position, this action is meant to communicate, “I am willing to be peaceful as long as you are willing to do the same.” This is how stray cats manage to live peacefully with one another, despite being solitary by nature.

More About Communication Via Scent

Even though cats do not talk like humans, they have a very developed and sophisticated form of communication. Obviously, cats communicate vocally through meows, hisses, and other vocal noise. Much less obvious is cat’s ability to communicate via scent.

Pheromones

Cats can communicate their breeding capability, sex, age, and social hierarchy through something called pheromones. Pheromones are almost like scented messages that cats use to send out information about themselves and learn information about other cats.Cats often use pheromones to claim their territory by rubbing their faces on items. Many pheromone glands are located on the cat’s face, which makes it easy for cats to find what they want to claim and rub their pheromones on it.Because so many said glands are located on the face, it’s likely no shock that cats go nose to nose in order to smell one another’s pheromones more closely. There can be many reasons or purposes behind going nose to nose to smell the other cat’s pheromones.Nevertheless, three purposes for going nose to nose are more common than anything else. More specifically, cats go nose to nose to greet one another, learn where the other has been, and to establish dominance by smelling each other’s pheromones. Let’s look at each one of these messages more closely.

1. Greeting One Another

The most basic reason that cats will touch noses is as a greeting. You can think of nose touches as the cat’s form of a handshake. It allows the cats to smell one another’s pheromones and simply get used to the other.If two cats are going nose to nose and are not acting aggressively in any way, they are most likely greeting one another. You should allow the process to continue. The cats are simply getting familiar with one another.It should be relatively easy to know when cats are greeting each other through their nose-to-nose touches. If the act is not accompanied with aggressive behavior and the cats are really taking the time to smell one another, they likely are just greeting each other.

2. Smelling Where the Other Has Been

Sometimes, cats touch noses not as a greeting, but to learn where they have been. This often happens with cats who are very familiar with one another and don’t need any more introduction.Whenever a cat rubs its pheromones on something, a little bit of that thing’s scent gets on the cat. So, the other cats can smell where they have been. By touching noses, the other cat may simply be curious about what they are smelling.If you have two cats that live together or are very familiar with one another, their nose touches should not be accompanied by any aggression. More so, the nose touches are likely to smell where the other has been if one of the cats have ventured off to new areas recently.

3. Establishing Place in Social Hierarchy

Sometimes, cats will go nose-to-nose in a more aggressive way and to establish their place in the social hierarchy. Pheromones can communicate dominance and mating preference. When going nose to nose, cats will express their pheromones to establish their territory and place in the hierarchy.It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to notice when a nose touch asserts dominance. Dominance smelling is accompanied with aggressive behavior, stiff motions, and an overall uneasy feeling. Additionally, cats will likely urinate or block the other cats way whenever they are going nose to nose in this manner.If one of the cats does not back down, the nose touching can easily escalate to a catfight. Conversely, if one cat clearly has pheromones that express dominance over the other, the dominant cat will hold its ground and the other will likely skulk away.Occasionally, even cats that like each other can go nose to nose to assert dominance. For example, house cats that live together may do this to claim territory over a favorite treat or food bowl.

The Nose Poke

Cats nose poke (gently touch their nose to the other’s nose) only trusted friends, be they feline, human, canine, or equine. A nose poke leaves the cat vulnerable as he must be close to the other entity to do it, therefore it is offered sparingly and only to the best of friends. Behaviorists vary on ideas as to why cats do this. Some suggest its related to the cat’s scent glands; scent glands release scent when rubbed and the nose poke is a gentle touch.A word of warning, though. Never force a nose poke. This communication needs to be initiated by the cat. If you try to force it, the action could be viewed by the cat as aggressive and you could be scratched or bitten.

The Face Rub

A face rub, unlike the nose poke, is both a greeting and a way to claim ownership. This claim is not dominant or possessive, however, as much as it is sharing scent and showing the world that the two of you belong together. Cats will rub their face and body (side rub) but the face has many scent glands, so much of the rubbing is with the face. These glands are located around the mouth and chin, along the sides of the face, and around the ears.This communication is not one way, however. When you pet your cat, rub his ears, and scratch under his chin, you are leaving your skin dander and skin oils on your cat, too.

Comfort in High Places

When someone adopts one of my foster kittens I always ask if they have a cat tree. Most adopters have one but sometimes the potential adopter looks confused. I’m often asked why they need cat furniture when they have a home full of furniture. I explain the cat tree is great for teaching a kitten where scratching and clawing is allowed (versus using your furniture for this), but the tree also provides the kitten a high, safe place.

The Head Bunt

Some cats give head bunts when they’re hungry, others when they just want your attention. With my cat, Scottie, the head bunt isn’t a push; it’s a bump, and every cat may adapt it for his or her own uses. If you don’t pay attention, for example, your cat may try a harder push to see if that gets your attention.The head bunt is usually an attention-getting behavior. Cats do it to get you to find them faster, and your cat could head bunt you for petting, to get you to play, or for cuddles.For most felines, high hiding places are safer than hiding places that are lower. In a low spot the cat could be disturbed by the family dog, children, or even the evil vacuum cleaner. In a high spot such as on a cat tree, on the back of the sofa, or the top of the refrigerator, the cat can see what’s coming.When your cat is in one of these spots, leave her alone. She’ll come down when she wants your attention.

Kneading and Sucking

Kneading is an action leftover from when the cat was a nursing kitten. Pushing with the front paws and then releasing, alternating paws, and flexing the toes, is a natural part of nursing and stimulates milk release. Many kittens will continue to do this after weaning and it is usually a comforting action. Kittens who have been taken from their mom too young will knead even when being fed with a bottle.Many cats will continue to knead even as adults. It usually occurs when the cat is being petted on a lap or in your bed as the kneading is associated with feelings of warmth and comfort.Unfortunately, as a kneading cat flexes his toes, the claws come out, turning kneading into a painful activity for the owner. Just pull a blanket, wrap or sweater over your skin so your cat can continue to knead but your skin is protected.Some cats as they knead will also suck on a piece of fabric (blanket or your shirt or sweater). This is also related to nursing behavior and is usually seen in kittens who were removed from momma too soon. If I take in foster kittens who are two or three weeks old, they will often knead and suck when being petted. Many will grow out of the behavior but some will continue to do this as they grow up.