Why Do Cats Like Cardboard?

Most feline servants will quickly learn that the expensive and elaborate toys dont hold a candle to the cardboard box. Cats will scoff at the shiny new toys in disappointment while turning a fluffy tail up at the gift. Cat logic dictates that they must choose the box that it came in over the toy itself. You may get lucky and find a willing cat that plays WITH their new toy inside the box.

The sense of security your feline feels from the safe space greatly helps reduce their stress. If a simple box can help avoid these issues, Ill happily cover my home with them!

Running from your problems isnt recommended for most humans, but for the feline, it can provide much needed time to cool down. Photo property of Cole and Marmalade ~ Sisters Jugg and Zig Zag playing in their first box Thats the range of temperatures in which cats are comfortable and dont have to generate extra heat to keep warm or expend metabolic energy on cooling.

That range also happens to be 20 degrees higher than ours, which explains why its not unusual to see your neighbors cat sprawled out on the hot asphalt in the middle of a summer day, soaking in the sunlight. With most humans enjoying a comfortably cool 72 degrees in their homes, this can be quite chilly for our furry friends. Remember, when planning out your cardboard enrichment projects keep your cats natural instincts in mind.

Boxes provide concealment that can give cats a chance to hide from their prey, catching them unaware.1 If you have multiple cats in your home, you’ve no doubt seen one cat hide in a box waiting for the unsuspecting second cat to wander by. Boxes are great for sneak attacks on fellow cats and your unsuspecting ankles.

This means that when you’re bringing a cat home for the first time, a cardboard box might be a helpful item to have on hand. This insulation is something cats crave when they are outdoors, since boxes may also provide shelter from the weather.

5 Cats love exploring the lay of the land, so they can get excited if you bring something new into your home, whether it’s a toy, a grocery bag, or a box. You might even make the box a little more welcoming by padding it with some soft blankets and throwing in one of your cat’s favorite toys.

Cats love boxes for a few reasons, according to science. In a cardboard box, our cryptic kitties get everything from a stress-reducing hiding spot to a cozy, warm spot for a catnap. Here are four reasons why cats and boxes make the best of friends.

A recent study found that providing hiding boxes to feral cats as they arrive at an animal shelter decreases their stress and reduces the time it takes them to recover from the transition. These sensations of gentle pressure stimulate the body to produce endorphins, neurochemicals that boost pleasure, reduce pain, and create a sense of well-being.

She discovered this phenomenon early in her life , when she found that steady pressure on the trunk of her body was soothing, relieved anxiety and decreased feelings of overstimulation. I was packing to move to a new house, and I started to get worried that I couldnt find my cat Toast anywhere. my cat-loving friend Texas told me.

You like many cat owners you will have noticed your felines tendency to favour the cardboard packaging their new toys arrive in, as opposed to the toys themselves. Cardboard boxes are a particular hit and the phrase If it fits, I sits can be applied to almost any type of cardboard box. Small, tall and hardly enough space at all boxes will all be used by your kitty. So why do they love cardboard boxes so much?

Enrichment

We laughingly admit that we “talk” to our feline companions and are sure they are responding to us. But cats by nature, cannot simply talk through an issue or discuss their problems with other felines. They tend to retreat to their comfort zone, avoiding conflicts instead.Running from your problems isn’t recommended for most humans, but for the feline, it can provide much needed time to “cool down”. In their happy place, their anger and anxiety ideally melts away.Unless you are Jugg and Zig Zag and use the box as a wrestling ring!The only issue here is that if your cat begins spending TOO much time in isolation, other issues may arise. Be sure to show them lots of love and attention so they know the outside world isn’t such a bad place.Cardboard does a wonderful job of retaining body heat…something our sunbeam-soaked cats crave. The average body temperature for felines is between 99-102.5 degrees F.In 2006, the National Research Council reported that the thermoneutral zone for a domestic cat is 86 to 97 degrees Fahrenheit.With most humans enjoying a comfortably cool 72 degrees in their homes, this can be quite chilly for our furry friends. Cardboard boxes help provide insulation to help them retain their body heat, no matter the time of day.This theory can be traced back to natural feline instincts before they were (happily) domesticated. Primarily living outdoors and hunting in the wild, most of their food sources came from wooded areas.Simply, forests have trees, paper is made from tree pulp, cardboard is made from paper.The smells associated with paper may remind them of these desirable wooded areas. Although cats are obligatory carnivores, meaning they must have meat to survive, plants can be enticing too. Some believe that cats crave a more fibrous texture plants provide. The smell of the plant based cardboard gets those taste buds tingling. I know we’ve had many a box here decorated with “FANGtastically decorated edges” courtesy of the cats.

Boxes Make Great Hunting Hideouts

Boxes provide concealment that can give cats a chance to hide from their prey, catching them unaware.

Boxes Make Cats Feel Safe

Boxes help cats feel safe.In fact, in Gourkow and Phillips (2016) study of clicker training in shelter cats suggested that when provided with boxes, cats seemed to show lower stress levels. This means that when you’re bringing a cat home for the first time, a cardboard box might be a helpful item to have on hand. Your cat might feel right at home and much less stressed if there’s a box greeting him.

They Help Keep Cats Warm

Boxes can help keep cats warm. Cats‘ normal body temperatures can range from 99.5°F to 102.5°F. Cardboard can provide insulation that helps them retain their body heat.This insulation is something cats crave when they are outdoors, since boxes may also provide shelter from the weather. Even if your cat is indoors only, your furry friend still feels an instinctual need for shelter.

The Box Is New and Mysterious

The “new” factor of a box might be enough to grab your cat’s interest.This “new” factor might also explain why cats like paper and why cats like bags. A new crinkled-up paper or bag can be very enticing because it provides a new opportunity for exploring.

Large Cats Love Boxes Too

You might be surprised to learn that large cats love boxes just as much as your pet cat.Big Cat Rescue

3. Boxes keep cats warmer

Cats like to be in warm rooms—warmer than most people prefer. This might be because they are descended from desert dwelling cats of ancient Egypt. And it’s definitely the reason that cats are magnetically attracted to warm spots like heating vents, sunny spots, and the top of appliances.Boxes help keep heat in and make for cozy sleeping.