Why Do Cats Like Cardboard Boxes?

Owners are constantly baffled when they buy their cat a cool new toy and they’re much more interested in the box it came in! But why do cats love boxes so much? Keep reading to find out why.

Cats are ambush predators and finding confined places where they can hide, hunt prey and feel safe and warm is an instinctive behaviour. Cats get comfort and security from enclosed spaces, which is why they love spending time in cardboard boxes.

If your cat is in a box, any intruders like prey, humans or other pets have to come directly into their field of vision, meaning nothing can surprise them. We recommend providing your cat with a box in your home to give them a safe space for them to escape to. Cardboard is the perfect texture for your cat to bite and scratch, making them great fun to play with.

Many owners find that cats love boxes purely to bite and chew, and soon shred them to bits. To your cat, a plain old box makes a really interesting and fun toy that can keep them entertained for days on end.

Why is my cat obsessed with cardboard?

Boredom. If your cat is easily bored, biting on cardboard boxes might be a way for her to find something to do and expend some of her energy. … If you give your cat attention while she’s doing something destructive, you are actually teaching her that if she keeps doing this behavior, she will always get your attention.

Why do cats sleep in cardboard boxes?

The reasons are primarily that boxes provide shelter from stress, and that they keep cats warm. … Cardboard boxes are usually made of multiple layers of card to provide strength, which makes them a good insulator for cats trying to keep out of a cold draught.

Why do cats like boxes that are too small?

Cats are naturally drawn to small, confined spaces such as baskets, boxes, nooks and even vases. They feel comfortable and comforted there, even when they don’t exactly fit. … The places our cats choose to snuggle into provide a measure of security to them, physically and psychologically.

Why do cats like going into boxes?

“And a box gives them a place of safety and security.” While inside a box, cats feel that they cannot be snuck up on from behind or the side — anything that wants to approach them must come directly into their field of vision. In effect, such hiding spaces allow them to watch the world around them without being seen.

Cats love boxes for a few reasons, according to science. In a cardboard box, our cryptic kitties get everything from a stress-reducing hiding spot to a cozy, warm spot for a catnap. Here are four reasons why cats and boxes make the best of friends.

A recent study found that providing hiding boxes to feral cats as they arrive at an animal shelter decreases their stress and reduces the time it takes them to recover from the transition. These sensations of gentle pressure stimulate the body to produce endorphins, neurochemicals that boost pleasure, reduce pain, and create a sense of well-being.

She discovered this phenomenon early in her life , when she found that steady pressure on the trunk of her body was soothing, relieved anxiety and decreased feelings of overstimulation. I was packing to move to a new house, and I started to get worried that I couldnt find my cat Toast anywhere. my cat-loving friend Texas told me.

Most feline servants will quickly learn that the expensive and elaborate toys dont hold a candle to the cardboard box. Cats will scoff at the shiny new toys in disappointment while turning a fluffy tail up at the gift. Cat logic dictates that they must choose the box that it came in over the toy itself. You may get lucky and find a willing cat that plays WITH their new toy inside the box.

The sense of security your feline feels from the safe space greatly helps reduce their stress. If a simple box can help avoid these issues, Ill happily cover my home with them!

Running from your problems isnt recommended for most humans, but for the feline, it can provide much needed time to cool down. Photo property of Cole and Marmalade ~ Sisters Jugg and Zig Zag playing in their first box Thats the range of temperatures in which cats are comfortable and dont have to generate extra heat to keep warm or expend metabolic energy on cooling.

That range also happens to be 20 degrees higher than ours, which explains why its not unusual to see your neighbors cat sprawled out on the hot asphalt in the middle of a summer day, soaking in the sunlight. With most humans enjoying a comfortably cool 72 degrees in their homes, this can be quite chilly for our furry friends. Remember, when planning out your cardboard enrichment projects keep your cats natural instincts in mind.

Love and marriage, horse and carriage, peanut butter and jelly, biscuits and gravy, thunder and lightning You know this game! What else? Cats and boxes! Thats right! Everyone knows how much cats love boxes. You can google it in images and have a literal melt-down from all the adorable pictures. There is even a facebook page titled Cats in Boxes where people post all sorts of funny pictures of their cat in a box. Cats have some kind of deep-rooted attraction to boxes. Its really kind-of odd that they would prefer a manufactured, utility-type of container to nearly every any other type of toy or enclosure, isnt it?

A new environment can be very stressful for a cat and a hiding box helps to make the transition more comfortable. These anxious, frightened shelter cats found comfort and security with having a box to hide in.

Our domestic cats no longer need to hunt for survival, but it sure feels good to play like it! Cats are notorious scratchers sharpening their claws on your couch, your curtains, the carpet Boxes make for great scratching. So it makes sense that if they have their own little hiding place, they leave their scent on it to mark the territory as their own.

It is believed that they enjoy chewing and tearing up boxes because they are fulfilling their instinct to kill and rip-up her prey. Dont waste your money on one of those fancy, expensive cat beds Just throw a blanket in your little fur-princess box and youve given her a palace! Boxes tend to be their favorite, but youll find cats curled up in any type of enclosure their owners purse, a suitcase, drawers, the laundry basket, cabinets anywhere that proves to be a good hiding place.

These items can get tangled or lodged in your cats intestines, or even loop around their internal organs causing a blockage.

Why do cats like boxes?

There are lots of reasons that cats love boxes, but the main one is because they’re confined, enclosed spaces. Cats are ambush predators and finding confined places where they can hide, hunt prey and feel safe and warm is an instinctive behaviour. Snug cardboard boxes fit the bill perfectly.

Boxes are safe

Cats get comfort and security from enclosed spaces, which is why they love spending time in cardboard boxes. Cats use boxes as hiding places where predators can’t sneak up on them from the side or behind. If your cat is in a box, any “intruders” like prey, humans or other pets have to come directly into their field of vision, meaning nothing can surprise them.And cats like boxes because they help to reduce stress and offer a safe zone where your cat can observe and not be seen. This is ideal for cats as their reaction to stressful situations is often to run and hide. Cats don’t have in-built conflict resolution strategies, so they much prefer to hide from their problems. The safety of the private, enclosed space is another possible answer to why do cats like boxes.

They help cats to adapt

A recent study conducted by the University of Utrecht recently discovered another reason why cats love boxes. The study was performed on a group of shelter cats, and around half were assigned boxes and the other half were not.The research discovered that the cats with the boxes actually recovered faster and adapted to their environment quicker. This shows that boxes are incredibly beneficial for cats to help deal with change! Read our guide to cat anxiety for more tips on treating it.

Cats are just curious

Another reason why cats love boxes is because they’re great for warmth! Not only is cardboard an amazing insulator, but the small space that boxes offer encourages your cat to curl up and relax, making it a comfy, warm space. The ideal temperature for cats to be comfortable is around 37

They make great places to sleep

Another reason why cats like boxes is because they are a great place to sleep. Cats spend up to 18 hours every day sleeping, so finding the perfect spot is important.Where you may see a simple cardboard box, your cat sees a safe, luxury cave that promises warmth and protection. We recommend providing your cat with a box in your home to give them a safe space for them to escape to.

It’s all about texture

Another reason why cats love boxes so much is the texture. Cardboard is the perfect texture for your cat to bite and scratch, making them great fun to play with. Many owners find that cats love boxes purely to bite and chew, and soon shred them to bits. To your cat, a plain old box makes a really interesting and fun toy that can keep them entertained for days on end.

3. Boxes keep cats warmer

Cats like to be in warm rooms—warmer than most people prefer. This might be because they are descended from desert dwelling cats of ancient Egypt. And it’s definitely the reason that cats are magnetically attracted to warm spots like heating vents, sunny spots, and the top of appliances.Boxes help keep heat in and make for cozy sleeping.

Enrichment

We laughingly admit that we “talk” to our feline companions and are sure they are responding to us. But cats by nature, cannot simply talk through an issue or discuss their problems with other felines. They tend to retreat to their comfort zone, avoiding conflicts instead.Running from your problems isn’t recommended for most humans, but for the feline, it can provide much needed time to “cool down”. In their happy place, their anger and anxiety ideally melts away.Unless you are Jugg and Zig Zag and use the box as a wrestling ring!The only issue here is that if your cat begins spending TOO much time in isolation, other issues may arise. Be sure to show them lots of love and attention so they know the outside world isn’t such a bad place.Cardboard does a wonderful job of retaining body heat…something our sunbeam-soaked cats crave. The average body temperature for felines is between 99-102.5 degrees F.In 2006, the National Research Council reported that the thermoneutral zone for a domestic cat is 86 to 97 degrees Fahrenheit.With most humans enjoying a comfortably cool 72 degrees in their homes, this can be quite chilly for our furry friends. Cardboard boxes help provide insulation to help them retain their body heat, no matter the time of day.This theory can be traced back to natural feline instincts before they were (happily) domesticated. Primarily living outdoors and hunting in the wild, most of their food sources came from wooded areas.Simply, forests have trees, paper is made from tree pulp, cardboard is made from paper.The smells associated with paper may remind them of these desirable wooded areas. Although cats are obligatory carnivores, meaning they must have meat to survive, plants can be enticing too. Some believe that cats crave a more fibrous texture plants provide. The smell of the plant based cardboard gets those taste buds tingling. I know we’ve had many a box here decorated with “FANGtastically decorated edges” courtesy of the cats.