Why Do Cats Get Zoomies?

If you’ve ever seen your cat go from zero to 60 in just a few seconds from catnapping to making a wild dash across the floor they probably had a case of the cat zoomies. But what are cat zoomies and why does your usually chill cat get these sudden bursts of energy?

“Such discomfort could be caused by infections or inflammatory processes involving the urinary tract, colon or rectum,” explains Dr. Mike Paul for the Pet Health Network . Accompanying weight loss, changes in litter box usage or unusual vocalization , for example, should prompt you to bring your cat to the vet.

Once you’ve determined that your cat’s spontaneous bouts of wildness are nothing to worry about, you can try to plan your play sessions around their zoomies, as International Cat Care recommends: “Playtime … actually has the most beneficial effects if it is provided relatively frequently in short energetic bursts of activity.”

Why do cats get the Zoomies at night?

Cats that get the zoomies late at night might be releasing all the pent-up energy that hasn’t been spent hunting or playing throughout the day. Cats are predators at heart that rely on the act of hunting (or play hunting) to stimulate their mental instincts and desires.

Why do cats start running around like crazy?

The most logical explanation is that this behavior could simply be pent-up energy in your cat. Cats spend lots of time lying around just watching the world go by. But they do have energy to burn just like any other animal. The racing around could be a way of burning off that pent-up energy.

Why do cats suddenly go hyper?

Not all unwanted behavior from cats is behavioral. With older cats, the most common physical reason for overactive activity is hyperthyroidism. Cats with this condition have an overactive thyroid gland, which is the control mechanism for their energy levels. Subsequently, you’ll have a cat with bursts of energy.

Why do cats have a mad half hour?

Main Causes. In most cases, this period of the day is essentially our cat’s way of releasing energy in a short, concentrated burst. In the same way that humans are advised to get 30 mins exercise a day, it’s often our pet’s means of getting the movement they need while venting any pent up frustrations or feelings.

Picture this youre sitting around, having a quiet evening when suddenly your cat barrels out of nowhere, running around the house like a madwoman. This behavior is called the cat zoomies, and its probably completely normal but there are some instances when it might necessitate a trip to the vet. Lets learn more.

Zoomies is a word used to describe seemingly random periods of bursts of energy in cats. Cats with the zoomies might suddenly leap up and race around the living room or even the entire house, running, jumping, climbing and otherwise going crazy with activity.

In between the long periods of rest and sleep, cats often experience a surge in energy (in the wild, this is when they would be hunting). Despite having easy access to food, domesticated cats are still driven by their instincts to hunt and chase prey.

Some indoor cats are desperate for something to break up the monotony, so they make up their own fun time in the form of the zoomies, which can combat their pent-up energy. Oddly enough, frenetic random activity periods (also known as FRAPs, or the zoomies) are one sign of hyperthyroidism in cats. Senior cats suffering from changes in sight, hearing, and their sense of smell may also start displaying frequent bouts of the zoomiesbecoming startled by something can sometimes trigger the zoomies.

If your older cat starts showing more frequent zoomies, especially if she hasnt really been prone to them before, have her checked out by a veterinarian. When cats are feeling upset about something going on in their life, they may display behavioral changes, including an increased incidence of the zoomies. This can be a normal response, as sort of victory lap to the feeling of lightening their load so to speak.

However, if it happens often, or if it is combined with inappropriate urination or defecation outside the litter box, you should have your cat seen by a vet to rule out any health issues.

Why Cats Get the Zoomies

While it’s pretty easy to tell if your cat has a case of the zoomies, the reason behind them can be more mysterious. What are cat zoomies‘ causes? Here are three of the most common explanations.

1. Sleep Habits

Cats often get the zoomies after a long snooze. Because cats sleep much of the day in order to conserve energy (your feline friend can sleep anywhere from 12 to 16 hours a day), when they’re awake, they’re

2. Hunting Instinct

Despite getting all the food they need from their pet parents, cats are innate hunters and have a predatory instinct. Sometimes it may seem as if your cat is chasing nothing, when, more than likely, they’re pursuing imaginary prey. To get a sense of your kitty’s expert hunting skills, toss a few pieces of kibble down the hallway and see how quickly they bound after it.

3. Bathroom Issues

Many cats seem to take a victory lap after using the litter box. Some cats run like crazy after they’ve had a bowel movement, particularly if it was uncomfortable. “Such discomfort could be caused by infections or inflammatory processes involving the urinary tract, colon or rectum,” explains Dr. Mike Paul for the Pet Health Network. “It could even be caused by constipation issues.” If your veterinarian rules out medical reasons for the post-bathroom sprinting, you can conclude that it’s probably just your cat’s way of celebrating a job well done.

When to Contact the Vet

If your zooming cat is otherwise healthy, there’s no need to worry.If you notice excessive zooming, though, keep an eye out for any other unusual behaviors that may signal something’s wrong. Accompanying weight loss, changes in litter box usage or unusual vocalization, for example, should prompt you to bring your cat to the vet. Cats are especially likely to exhibit changes in behavior as they age.

Playing Through the Zoomies

Once you’ve determined that your cat’s spontaneous bouts of wildness are nothing to worry about, you can try to plan your play sessions around their zoomies, as International Cat Care recommends: “Playtime … actually has the most beneficial effects if it is provided relatively frequently in short energetic bursts of activity.”Being an active participant in the zoomies is a great way for you to bond with your kitty, help them release pent-up energy and tire them out for their next snooze. Plus, watching your cat bound aimlessly throughout the house might just be their way of trying to tell you that they want to play. After all, we all know that your cat is really in charge of you, and not the other way around!

First, what are cat zoomies?

Cats with the zoomies often get a bit of a glint in their eyes and then start rapidly moving. These rapid movements may take the form of running laps around the house, zipping out from under tables, going up and down the stairs, or running on and off your lap while meowing loudly. And then — as quickly as the cat zoomies started — your cat may just relax again.I call cat zoomies the kitty Olympics in our house because of the sprints my three cats will do from one floor to the other. Cat zoomies have a scientific name: Frenetic Random Activity Periods or FRAPs. FRAPs are surprising and sometimes alarming (especially in the middle of the night), yet completely normal, cat behavior.

What causes the cat zoomies?

Kittens and young cats naturally have lots of energy and generally experience zoomies more frequently than older cats, though inspiration can strike cats of any age. Even my 17-year-old cats get inspired to run around like kittens when they experience the zoomies.Many different things cause FRAPs. Cats may start zooming if another cat in the house has the zoomies, cats might zoom if they’re chasing a bug, and cats can zoom in the middle of the night when their human gets up to use the bathroom. Sometimes it feels like cats get the zoomies out of nowhere, or it seems like they’ve seen a ghost.

What Are Cat Zoomies?

Cats are known for strange behaviors, but cats are not the only species that exhibit zoomies. Dogs get the zoomies, too.Believe it or not, there is even a technical term that veterinarians use for the zoomies:

Why Do Cats Get Zoomies?

As it turns out, the zoomies are not random. There are several different reasons cats get the zoomies; some are related to cat behavior and some reasons are medical.Let’s break down the most common causes of the cat zoomies:

Sleep-Related Zoomies

It’s no secret that cats sleep a lot. In between the long periods of rest and sleep, cats often experience a surge in energy (in the wild, this is when they would be hunting). That burst of feel-good vibes can sometimes trigger the zoomies in cats.

Hunting Instinct Zoomies

Despite having easy access to food, domesticated cats are still driven by their instincts to hunt and chase prey. Cats sometimes get the urge to act out on these instincts by stalking imaginary prey and suddenly pouncing, which may trigger the further urge to begin racing around the house in a frenzy of activity.

Boredom/Lack of Activity

Living inside is safe for a house cat, but it’s also far less interesting than surviving in the wild. Some indoor cats are desperate for something to break up the monotony, so they make up their own fun time in the form of the zoomies, which can combat their pent-up energy.

Feline Hyperthyroidism

Oddly enough, frenetic random activity periods (also known as FRAPs, or the zoomies) are one sign of hyperthyroidism in cats.This condition, which is common in middle aged and senior cats, occurs when the thyroid gland becomes overactive, making too many thyroid hormones. In addition to hyperactivity, other signs of hyperthyroidism in cats include weight loss, increased appetite, increased thirst, excessive urination, vomiting and diarrhea.If your cat is experiencing the zoomies more than usual, and is also displaying other symptoms of hyperthyroidism, have her checked out by your veterinarian.

Age-Related Zoomies

In senior cats, zoomies are sometimes a sign of dementia and cognitive decline related to conditions such as cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).Senior cats suffering from changes in sight, hearing, and their sense of smell may also start displaying frequent bouts of the zoomies—becoming startled by something can sometimes trigger the zoomies.If your older cat starts showing more frequent zoomies, especially if she hasn’t really been prone to them before, have her checked out by a veterinarian.

Anxiety and Stress

When cats are feeling upset about something going on in their life, they may display behavioral changes, including an increased incidence of the zoomies. Sometimes, strife between one or more cats in a multi-cat household may lead to excessive zoomies. If you’re also noticing your cats having accidents outside the litter box, disharmony in the home may be to blame.

Bathroom-Related Zoomies

Some cats race around the house after using the litter box, especially after they poop. This can be a normal response, as sort of victory lap to the feeling of “lightening their load” so to speak.However, if it happens often, or if it is combined with inappropriate urination or defecation outside the litter box, you should have your cat seen by a vet to rule out any health issues.