Why Do Cats Close Their Eyes When You Pet Them?

Most felines enjoy being cuddled, petted and fussed over. Some may go to great lengths to let you know that they enjoy the cuddles and petting. They may purr, headbutt you, lick your nose or lay and get comfy on your lap while closing their eyes.

Aside from being appreciative, enjoying the gestures and as an expression of trust, your cat may also close her eyes because she feels extremely relaxed. Her breathing is usually slow and steady, her ears and whiskers are in a neutral position and the tail is low and static.

she is squirming and attempting to escape she is batting at hands with claws she is growling her ears are pinned back her eyes are widely dilated her tail is twitching or swishing wildly A cat that wants to cuddle and be petted will push her face against your hand and will lead you to her ears or chin. If you observe your cat nudging you with her head or rubbing her cheeks against her body, that is a very positive sign confirming that she is receptive of your cuddles and petting.

To approach your cat for a hug, start by giving her a few soft pets and slowly pick her up to hold her.

Why does my cat close its eyes when I pet him?

Cats close their eyes when you pet them because petting gives them pleasure. Most of all, it is a sign of complete trust toward you and that you are someone with whom she can hold her defenses down.

Do cats feel love when you pet them?

It’s a question that many cat owners have wondered. And the answer is a resounding yes! Cats often feel love quite strongly for their owners and other companions.

An essential part of pet care is staying attuned to your animals emotional needs and responding accurately to these bids for connection. A big part of this is petting your cat! Animals vary in their desire for tactile interaction, but most of them will appreciate a massage here and there. In the course of giving your cat a good head or backrub, you might have noticed that it tends to close its eyes. So, why do cats close their eyes when you pet them?

You probably know that in addition to a healthy diet, exercise, mental stimulation, and regular visits to the vet, most pets crave love and attention just like we do. Pupils that have narrowed into slits convey strong emotions as well, often anger, annoyance, or aggression.

Vertical pupils aid predatory animals in their hunting and night vision capacity. Like human eyes, a cats pupils will change size to adjust to the light input they receive. You might notice that your friendly feline will opt to make eye contact with you when he or she wants food, attention, or when you talk to each other.

A weaker adversary will avert their eyes submissively in deference to the stronger one, which is why cats have been known to seek out the one person in the crowd who doesnt like them! A cats keen sense of vision might lead him or her to follow the path of a minuscule insect or carefully stalk a floating speck of dust. However, you may have gotten mixed messages while attempting to show your kitty some love and left with battle scars.

Though they share some affinity for the same rub zones, not all places will receive a thumbs er paws up from your finicky feline. At the same time, youll want to be careful its tempting to reach out and feel that fluffy underside, but most cats dont appreciate being petted in that spot. You will also hear a gentle rumbling coming from their throats a cats purr is another way to know theyre feeling content.

If your cat closes its eyes when you pet him or her, youve received just about your feline buddys highest compliment.

Our cats are intriguing little beings. While all cats are individuals, many cats seem to close their eyes when you go to pet them. Your cats sense of touch is much more heightened than yours, which explains why they are so quick to react should you touch them in a region which they do not approve of. Like their belly or the base of their tail, as these zones of their bodies hold many super-sensitive nerve endings and can instantly result in overstimulation.

And if you feel happy right along with them, go ahead and give them a slow blink back in return so the two of you can speak the same language.

What Do Cats Eyes Tell You

Catseyes are incredibly expressive. If you know your cat well, you can probably recognize contentment, sadness, annoyance, or ecstasy. Here are some physical descriptions you might observe in your feline and what they convey.

Pupil Size

Cats’ pupils will dilate when they’re in a heightened state of arousal. This can translate to excitement, fear, or defensiveness.If you see your cat’s pupils growing, it means they have decided that the situation at hand deserves more attention,When the pupil is enlarged, it helps the optical receptors receive as much information about their surroundings. You must take cues from other parts of the cat’s body to see if this attention is negative or positive.An arched back and bushy tail is a sign of defensiveness. A waving tail and lots of meowing could mean excitement over that can of food you’re opening.

Narrowed Pupils

Pupils that have narrowed into slits convey strong emotions as well, often anger, annoyance, or aggression. Coupled with arched eyelids and a tense body, your cat, may be poised for attack.Vertical pupils aid predatory animals in their hunting and night vision capacity. The unique eye shape affords them a sharper depth-perception than those with round pupils or horizontal slits.A cat’s eyes at rest will also be on the narrow side, though not as narrow as can be described as ‘slits.’ Paired with a relaxed body, smiling eyes, and a gently moving tail, you’re in the presence of a happy cat.Like human eyes, a cat’s pupils will change size to adjust to the light input they receive. That’s why it helps to look for other clues in your cat’s body language to decode his or her messages.

Slow Blinking

Is your cat making eyes at you? A cat may slowly open and close its eyes dreamily – these eye movements are like little kisses from your pet and exude contentment, love, and trust.Feel free to slow-blink in return to let your cat know it’s mutual!

Should You Make Eye Contact With Cats

As a general rule, it’s perfectly ok to make eye contact with your cat. You might notice that your friendly feline will opt to make eye contact with you when he or she wants food, attention, or when you “talk” to each other.Problems may arise when attempting to maintain prolonged eye contact. Animals use eye contact to establish dominance amongst themselves and view prolonged eye contact as aggressive or threatening.A weaker adversary will avert their eyes submissively in deference to the stronger one, which is why cats have been known to seek out the one person in the crowd who doesn’t like them!

Why Is My Cat Staring

A cat’s senses operate on a delicately acute level. While you might be sharing the same space, you do not necessarily see the same things.Many cat owners have observed their very intelligent pets spending hours staring at the wall. What are they staring at?A cat’s keen sense of vision might lead him or her to follow the path of a minuscule insect or carefully stalk a floating speck of dust.It’s also possible that in those moments, cats are applying their sensitive ears more than their sharp eyes. Cats can detect the sounds of air moving through your vents or small animals moving about in your walls (sorry).Maybe your cat is staring at you! A cat is wired to visually monitor its surroundings, and that includes you. You are the source of their food, attention, and care. It is natural for them to maintain a certain interest in your actions as they survey the scene.Catseyes are engineered differently than humans’. While we rely on the closing of our eyelids to keep our eyes hydrated, cats have the added benefit of a third type of eyelid, a thin layer called the nictitating membrane, to moisten and remove debris from the eyes. This saves them the need for frequent blinking.Don’t get into a staring contest with your cat – they’ll probably win!

Do Cats Like To Be Petted

Generally, yes. Contrary to the widespread view that cats are aloof and uncaring animals, most house cats build strong relationships with their owners and enjoy their touch.However, you may have gotten mixed messages while attempting to show your kitty some love and left with battle scars. Your cat may be trying to tell you that that spot is not one of its preferred petting areas.Many people make the mistake of equating cats with dogs. Though they share some affinity for the same rub zones, not all places will receive a thumbs – er – paws up from your finicky feline.If your cat rolls on its back, exposing its tummy, that’s a good sign! Your cat feels safe enough to reveal its most vulnerable side. At the same time, you’ll want to be careful – it’s tempting to reach out and feel that fluffy underside, but most cats don’t appreciate being petted in that spot.Of course, there are cats out there who break the mold and do enjoy a belly rub. See how your cat reacts when it’s in a relaxed state and refrain from continuing if you observe any agitation.Other places that seem to bother cats when touched are their paws and tail.

Ah, That Feels Nice!

As you already know, cats are not naturally trusting. While there are certainly some cats who are naturally less on guard than others, many cats take a bit to feel comfortable around someone they don’t know. Think of your surroundings when you are petting your cat. Usually you are doing this inside your home and on their terms. When cats trust you, they don’t feel the need to be on high alert. And for them, closing their eyes around you is the ultimate sign of trust. If you watch closely, you will likely notice your feline friend slow blinking, too. This is their way of giving you a kitty kiss! 😘

I Like You

Cats are finicky beings who are highly selective with those they choose to be around. Much unlike canines, cats do not seek praise or need to be told that they’re a good boy or doing a good job. For a cat to choose you as a person they’d like to befriend, this speaks volumes about who you are as a person. Cats are great at sensing the energy of people. When a cat chooses to allow you to pet them, you’ve already mastered the hard part. When you pet a cat for the first time, they generally observe you as you do so. And we all know like I mentioned above that there are a few spots felines prefer not to be pet. Cats usually favor being pet on their heads and around their necks. Wonder why this is? Well, because they can easily see your hands and can rely on those ninja-like cat reflexes should those hands move to a spot not of their choosing.