Why Do Cats Chatter at Birds?

Anyone with a cat is likely familiar with that funny sound cats make when they spot a bird outside a window, or maybe when they’re chasing their favorite feather toy.

It has a lot to do with their hunting instincts, according to Dr. Erika Loftin, veterinarian and critical care specialist at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital . Siege the CatCats usually chirp when they’re looking at birds or squirrels, but they may also do it when they’re excited about “hunting” toys or kibble, or even their humans, although this is much rarer, Loftin said.

Why do cats make a chattering sound when they see a bird?

“Generally, cat chirping occurs when a cat is interested in or provoked by prey – a bird, a squirrel or a rodent, for example,” Loftin told The Dodo. “It’s more of an excited sound and less of a sound used to hunt. … “We usually hear this chattering behavior when a cat cannot get to the prey,” Haddon said.

Why are cats obsessed with birds?

Young kittens, as well as hyperactive breeds are extremely curious by nature. New odors, sights and noises can easily attract their attention. The need to satisfy their curiosity will make them do some crazy things, such as pawing at the TV screen whenever it’s showing chirping birds.

What noise do cats make when they see a bird?

Cat chattering (also called chirping or twittering) nearly always happens when a cat is titillated by a visual stimulus such as a bird or rodent moving about. These are her hunting instincts kicking in.

Why do cats chatter when they see something?

Usually, chattering is a reaction to prey. Your cat’s chattering might be an expression of excitement about spotting what they instinctively see as their next meal (or maybe their next “toy” for many of our lazy, well-fed house cats). … Another theory behind why cats chatter is that they are frustrated.

If youve noticed your cat making a strange chirping noise as he stares out the window at flies, people, or other cats, no need to worry. Its called cat chattering, and its just his predatory instinct.

Sometimes, you might also notice physical changes in your cat as she chatters: Her eyes may widen, her pupils may dilate, and her ears may tilt forward.

Most cats find windows to be the optimal seat in the house. Your cat can catch a few rays of the sun and watch the birds and squirrels outside. Sometimes your cat will even perk up and watch the birds outside while making a chattering or meowing noise. Youve heard your cat make the noise in the past, but you dont know why, so you ask: why do cats meow at birds?

Meowing also communicates frustration for indoor cats that are unable to catch the bird. We can only guess why you may find your furry friend meowing at birds, but theres evidence that it usually links back to your cats ancestry.

Although we may never know the real reason why your cat makes all those strange noises when he looks at birds, we can theorize about what it may mean. Remember: your cat may meow or make a chattering noise, but its usually for the same reason. Cats are hunters by nature, even if they are now domesticated house pets.

If your indoor cat spots a bird outside the window and cant get to it, hell probably become frustrated easily. Instincts may never go away, but this also doesnt mean that you need to fear your cat killing a bird if he ever accidentally gets outside. For the most part, your indoor cat uses the bird outside your window as a free entertainment show.

Dont fret that your cat may be plotting a murder without your knowledge.

One curious aspect of cat behaviour is their tendency to chatter at birds. The piercing, laser-focused stare, quivering mouth and repetitive squeaking, meowing or chirping is often accompanied by a wagging tail and alert posture. Its fascinating to watch, but why do cats do it? Cat in a Flat finds out.

On an expedition into the Amazon rainforests of Brazil in 2005, researchers from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and UFAM (Federal University of Amazonas) recorded a margay, a small wild cat, mimicking the chattering calls of its prey. The margay vocalised calls to impersonate a baby pied tamarin, which attracted the primates to investigate the area around the wild cat.

People who live in the Amazon have often anecdotally recounted stories of wild cats, including jaguars and pumas, mimicking the calls of prey such as small primates and rodents. As WCS researcher Fabio Rohe said : Cats are known for their physical agility, but this vocal manipulation of prey species indicates a psychological cunning which merits further study.

When Do Cats Chatter?

Cat chattering (also called chirping or twittering) nearly always happens when a cat is titillated by a visual stimulus such as a bird or rodent moving about. These are her hunting instincts kicking in. Sometimes, you might also notice physical changes in your cat as she chatters: Her eyes may widen, her pupils may dilate, and her ears may tilt forward. She’s concentrating hard and her body shows it.