Why Do Cats Chase Lasers?

All cat parents are familiar with the eternal struggle between cat and laser pointer. For something so small and scentless, that little red dot sure can keep cats busyin spite of (or perhaps because of) the fact that they never really can catch it. Interestingly though, theres some debate about whether or not laser pointers are a great toy for our feline friends. So why do cats chase lasers, and is it time to ditch the laser in favor of a different type of toy?

Remember, your cat is stalking and pouncing on that red dot because its brain is telling it to catch the food and kill it. The laser is an unattainable target, and no matter how great your cats hunting skills are its never going to get to eat it and its never going to finish out its predatory cycle.

If you notice a connection between playing with your cat and a laser and bad behavior, its probably time to put the pointer away for good.

Is it cruel to play with a laser with a cat?

When used properly, playing with laser pointers is a fun cardio activity. If you shine a laser light directly into your cat’s eyes, however, it can harm your cat’s vision and can even permanently damage their eyes, emphasizes Cat Health. A laser’s light can burn the retina in the blink of an eye — literally.

Why are lasers bad for cats?

Most cats are likely to grow bored with chasing the laser pointer after a few minutes. But for your dog, it triggers something deeper. “The lack of closure in laser-beam chasing could be messing with your dog’s head,” according to Dr.

Do lasers make cats crazy?

Cats seem to go crazy pointlessly chasing the elusive beam of light. Cat laser pointers and cat laser toys can frustrate kitties, overstimulate them, and, in some cases, cause them to act aggressively toward playmates. … There are so many other exciting toys to use.

What do cats see when they see a laser?

Cats chase the laser pointer’s dot of light because it changes direction and speed. Cats see the moving dot as alive and worth catching.

Most of the concern surrounding laser pointers and cats stems from the laser itself. Is it dangerous for their eyes? Of course, you dont want to point the beam directly into your cats eyes on purpose, but no that really isnt the big problem with laser pointers. The real danger is the feeling of frustration a game of laser tag leaves with your cat.

The laser beams incessant moving taps into this prey drive and the cat cant help himself he has to chase it.

Many cats enjoy chasing after red dots, also known as laser pointer projections, as a favorite pastime. So why do cats like lasers so much? Are laser pointers good or bad for cats?

Its the reason your cat stares at small bugs crawling on the floor before pouncing on them or looks longingly into the yard at the birds at the birdfeeder. It is also the reason your outdoor cat may occasionally bring you presents, such as birds, lizards, or even small bunnies to leave on your doormat.

The truth is that you just need to make sure you are using the laser pointer in a safe manner that fulfills their hunting instinct and doesnt cause stress. Laser pointers can be great for helping cats lose weight and mental stimulation. Just like humans, pets need a proper diet and regular exercise to maintain a healthy weight .

As pet parents, we can use our cats natural prey drive to help keep them mentally and physically healthy. To get your cat moving, a laser pointer can be a great tool that you can use in conjunction with a good diet.

Surely youve pointer a laser in front of a cat watched the antics ensue. If you arent familiar, cats will chase laser pointers to the end of the earth. It could be going back and forth and theyll be mesmerized by this little dot. A smallest of dots, yet their attention is captured.

So, when youre flashing your laser pointer around, theyll instantly pick it up in their peripheral view. Not only that, but the brightness of the laser is a sharp contrast against their default dark background, making it stand out against everything else.

The Allure of the Laser

Lasers are inherently stimulating to cats because of what they represent: fast-moving prey. Just because your cat doesn’t have to work hard for its food (unless you count all the effort it takes to meow all morning until you fill up its bowl), doesn’t mean that it’s not hardwired for the job.As the dot of a laser darts around the room, your cat interprets it as a small animal trying to run and hide. As such, certain inherent feline behaviors come out, notably the innate desire to hunt, pounce, and kill the prey in question. The fact that it’s merely a projection doesn’t matter very much because your cat is operating on auto-pilot, not on intellect.

How Cats See Lasers

There’s another factor at play here too when your cat chases a laser, and that’s the fact that it simplyThe retina is one of the main structures of the eye. It is composed of two key types of cells: rods and cones. Rods deal with low light vision and detecting movement, while cones help the eye see color. Human eyes have more cones than rods, which means we see the world with a lot of vibrancy. Cats, on the other hand, have more rods than cones, making them experts at picking up even the slightest of movements.What does this have to do with lasers? It means that they’re pretty hard to ignore. The moment you turn a laser point on your cat is going to pick it up in its peripheral vision, and if it hasn’t quite figured out yet that it can’t actually eat that red dot (or if it knows it can’t but doesn’t care) then that’s all it will take to start its predatory cycle.

The Debate Over Cats and Lasers

It might be surprising to hear that there’s some controversy over whether it’s a good idea to tempt your cat with lasers, but the cat-laser debate is one that has been going on for some time.The main problem noted by cat enthusiasts who are anti-laser is that having your cat chase a laser is a form of teasing. Remember, your cat is stalking and pouncing on that red dot because its brain is telling it to catch the food and kill it. The cat’s not doing it distinctly as a form of play, even if it’s having fun.The laser is an unattainable target, and no matter how great your cat’s hunting skills are it’s never going to get to eat it and it’s never going to finish out its predatory cycle. Many cats figure out the ruse and stop interacting with the laser. Others find it immensely frustrating and may start behaving badly as a result. Frustrated cats act out in less than ideal ways, such as by becoming destructive or aggressive. If you notice a connection between playing with your cat and a laser and bad behavior, it’s probably time to put the pointer away for good.To help make laser pointers more of a game and less of a tease, give your cat a treat or a physical toy right when you’re finished playing. That way it’ll get the satisfaction of a “kill,” even if it’s not of the laser itself.

Why Do Cats Like Lasers?

Cats are natural predators and often have a high prey drive—the instinctual drive to catch rodents, birds, and bugs.It’s the reason your cat stares at small bugs crawling on the floor before pouncing on them or looks longingly into the yard at the birds at the birdfeeder. It is also the reason your outdoor cat may occasionally bring you “presents,” such as birds, lizards, or even small bunnies to leave on your doormat.

How Can Laser Pointers Benefit Cats?

You may have heard that laser pointers are not safe or are bad for cats. The truth is that you just need to make sure you are using the laser pointer in a safe manner that fulfills their hunting instinct and doesn’t cause stress.Here are some guidelines for playing it safe while using a laser with your cat: