Why Cats Pee on Clothes?

One of my cats is peeing in my son’s laundry basket full of clothes. He has always treated her fine, so this isn’t a personality problem. We keep his bedroom door shut, but somehow, every once in a while, when it is left open, it happens again. Is there some kind of repellent I can use to keep her out of his room? It has become so ingrained in her I don’t think she can be trained to stop. — Sue, Chino Valley, AZ

If the crate won’t fit, put it in the family room and sleep on the couch for a few days. After the initial adjustment period, put the crate in an area that is not high traffic, but near where you hang out most of the time, like the main living space of your home.

Why is my cat suddenly peeing on my clothes?

One of the most irritating things that can happen to a cat owner is to realise that your cat has taken a pee on your clothes. There are three main reasons why this may happen: medical problems, behavioural issues or simply (and the most common reason) their litter tray is dirty so they’ve chosen somewhere else to go.

How do I stop my cat from peeing on my stuff?

Begin by making sure your cat’s litter boxes are as clean and desirable as possible. ….Place litter boxes in a quiet yet accessible area of the home. ….Make sure there’s a box on each level of your home.

Why does my cat keep peeing on my stuff?

Frustration, stress, or anxiety can sometimes lead your cat to urinate places other than their litterbox. Any change in their routine, such as a new person in the household or moving to a new house, can cause this. They may also “mark” spots in the house with their urine as a means of marking their territory.

Why is my cat peeing on my clothes and towels?

No one knows for sure why cats do this, but they may not like the smell of the laundry or the smell or location of their litter box. They may be reacting to stress, which is often the result of change in the home, like the addition of a new baby, new furniture or a move to a new home.

Its a very common complaint you get in from a hard day at work, go to put on your PJs, and theyre covered in urine. Cats often pick the worst places to pee, sometimes even urinating right in front of their shocked owners. But contrary to popular opinion, they dont do this to make a point or because theyre getting back at their owners. There are many reasons why you might find your cat urinating in places other than their tray.

A urine sample usually reveals no bacteria or crystals, and theres not a lot that can help except pain relief and time. Of course, there are other causes of FLUTD, including bacterial cystitis and stones or tumors in the urinary tract, but these are much less common.

Image Credit By: dassel, pixabaySome cats will avoid their tray because they are stressed, but they arent suffering from FIC. If your cat is at the losing end of an argument, this bite is often on the tail or lower back meaning theyre uncomfortable when they pee. These cats have often had a confidence knock, too meaning theyve got a bit of anxiety or fear around urinating and will prefer a quiet spot.

Image Credit By: Maria Sbytova, shutterstock Did you know that 1 in 3 cats will suffer from chronic kidney disease ? You should use a proprietary pet odor removal product they contain enzymes to destroy the molecules that make the area smell. Even if you cant smell it, your cat probably can, and theyll be drawn to the area again so make sure you do a good clean up job!

1. FLUTD (Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease)

Cats are very prone to urinary issues – we call thisCats will display classic signs of cystitis – urinating little and often, painful urination, and even blood in the urine. Because it hurts to pee, cats will avoid their tray and pee in other places – my old cat used to use the bath. A urine sample usually reveals no bacteria or crystals, and there’s not a lot that can help except pain relief and time.If your cat is young and has recurrent problems where they won’t urinate in the tray, this is probably the main reason. Of course, there are other causes of FLUTD, including bacterial cystitis and stones or tumors in the urinary tract, but these are much less common.

2. Stress, Fear and Bullying

Some cats will avoid their tray because they are stressed, but they aren’t suffering from FIC. Instead, they develop a fear of using the tray. This is usually the case for cats who are being bullied.If the litter trays are somewhere that the cat finds scary, they’re going to avoid the tray and find a suitable replacement – often a pile of clothes on the floor! This affects cats that live in multi-cat households but are being bullied by one of the other cats, or even cats that are being bullied by a neighborhood cat.The litter tray is often by the cat flap, which may feel unsafe. Putting trays near large windows is also bound to cause problems if there’s a bully cat outside. For these cats, try placing a tray in the area they want to use – if that’s under the dining room table, place a tray there. This is clearly where they feel safe!

3. Marking

Next time your cat pees in front of you, watch what they’re peeing on. If it’s a vertical surface, they’re probably marking, not peeing! It’s a myth that neutering will stop cats from spraying – both males and females can spray even when they’re neutered, although they’re a little less likely to do it.Cats spray to mark their territory, especially if there’s something they’re worried about – like another cat nearby. So, if your cat is spraying, it’s worth working out what’s upsetting them. Is there a neighborhood cat threatening their territory? Perhaps there’s been strange people coming into the house? Is there anything you can do to help your cat feel more confident, like closing the curtains so they can’t see the other cat prowling around the garden?

4. Unclean Tray

Some cats just won’t use a tray that has something in it, even if it’s their own stool or urine. And this can be annoying, as sometimes they’ll wait until the tray is clean before using it, necessitating an immediate re-clean. Having several trays may well solve the problem, and self-cleaning trays can be worth the investment for these cats!

5. Arthritis

Arthritis is very common in older cats, with one study finding signs in 90% of cats over the age of 14. Unfortunately, cats often mask the signs of pain, and this means that owners (and even vets!) aren’t aware that they’re struggling. But sometimes they show subtle signs. Avoiding the litter tray is one of these signs, as cats with arthritis may struggle to get into their tray (especially if their tray is high-sided) or assume the urination position. And to make matters worse, if they find it painful to urinate, they sometimes assume it’s the tray at fault – and start urinating elsewhere.If your cat has started urinating in new places or avoiding the tray and they’re elderly, consider whether arthritis could be a possibility. Try a tray with lower sides, or provide ramps. Your vet can also recommend medication for them.

6. Injury

Just like arthritis, an injury to the legs or back can cause cats to be painful when urinating. The most common injury that can do this is a cat bite and the abscess that almost inevitably follows. If your cat is at the losing end of an argument, this bite is often on the tail or lower back – meaning they’re uncomfortable when they pee. If they associate the pain with the box, they’ll often try weeing elsewhere. These cats have often had a confidence knock, too – meaning they’ve got a bit of anxiety or fear around urinating and will prefer a quiet spot. Veterinary treatment is usually needed for the bite, too.

7. Kidney Disease

Did you know that 1 in 3 cats will suffer from chronic kidney disease? The failing kidneys can’t recoup water from the urine before it leaves the body, meaning that cats urinate more often, and a bigger volume. They drink more to compensate, but that inevitably leaves the body, too. These cats can saturate their tray quite quickly and may choose to urinate elsewhere. They may also be ‘caught short’ and not be able to make it to the tray. Cats with renal disease need veterinary care and support.