White Crested Black Polish Chicken?

What color eggs do white crested black Polish lay?

White Crested Black Polish, do they lay eggs? Yes, they lay medium sized white eggs.

Are Polish crested chickens good layers?

Polish are a very special and unique breed of chicken with their huge bouffant crest of feathers and v-shaped comb. … Egg laying is varied in this breed – some lay well and some very poorly. In short, Polish are sweet, beautiful exhibition birds and can be good layers in the backyard flock, but they’re not reliable.

Are white crested black Polish bantams?

The solid black body with a bright white “top hat” make these little bantams a favorite. They are non bearded, quite small, and easy to care for.

Are Polish chickens hard to raise?

The Polish is difficult to introduce to a flock with other breeds of chickens, especially if they are active or aggressive. They are low in the pecking order and are small with luxurious feathers and some health issues.

Polishyou either love them or hate them! Not many chicken keepers are on the fence about this breed. The lovers will crow about Polish being a very special and unique chicken breed, with their huge bouffant crest of feathers and v-shaped comb. They’ll tell you that they love the relatively small size of the Polish breed, that they’re super tame and lovely, and make wonderful pets.

Are you ready to meet with a fun, friendly, quirky chicken with personality and good looks? Well, wait, no more here they are! The Polish chicken has a long history, with much of it lost in the mists of time.

It is thought that the name Polish was derived from the old Dutch word pol for a large head. There are paintings of the bird from the fifteenth century where it seems to be part of everyday life, so it has been around for a long time.

Its hard to mistake a Polish chicken the hen will have a pom-pom hairdo which is fairly neat and tidy. On the other hand, the roosters look like a wild thing with the feathers giving a bad hair day impression! Polish chickens can also be bearded (depending on the variety), which sees a profusion of feathers around the head and face.

The egg production of polish chickens can be widely variable depending on the line of breeding. I could not find any information on the mother hens parenting ability, so I assume its a fairly rare occurrence! If, on the other hand, you want a bird for the kids 4H project that is easy to work with and docile, not inclined to peck or have temper tantrums, the Polish could fit your needs very well.

The 4H projects emphasize hands-on learning, so having a bird that can be handled frequently and thrive is a true blessing. They are good to raise with small kids in mind because of their gentle nature, and children seem to be unable to resist holding and cuddling them all of which the Polish hen will tolerate very well. This breed bore confinement very well , and due to its inquisitive nature and impeded eyesight, its probably best kept penned for safety.

If your home flock is packed with assertive breeds such as Rhode Islands, Welsummers etc., the Polish may be picked on. They tend to be low in the pecking order because of their docile nature and good temperament and pulling the head feathers seems to be irresistible to some birds! Finally, the head feathers are especially prone to lice or mites infestations, so the hens need to be checked regularly before the problem becomes especially troublesome.

The Polish are generally said to be a calm and gentle bird, suitable for children to have as pets. They can be nervous and flighty, but this is usually attributed to the birds head feathers visual problems. Talking or whistling on your approach to the bird will alert them that you are coming, and they will be less inclined to startle.

Although many Polish are bred purely for exhibition or eye candy, some breeders have chosen to remain truer to the birds origins. Most other chickens cant resist pulling those head feathers, leading to bald chickens.or worse. Polishes are great foragers in the yard and can fly fairly well, so beware of them roosting in trees!

Many breeders move their flocks inside a draft-proofed building in areas of freezing and damp winters. The crest and beard, if present, should be checked frequently and regularly for infestations of lice or mites and treated accordingly. Folks who show their Polish take great pains and a lot of time.

While flighty, they are a great conversation starter for those looking to decorate their flock with this ornamental breed.

Cackle Hatchery has White Crested Black Polish chicks available. The Polish breed originated in the Netherlands. Several varieties of this chicken breed were admitted into the American Standard of Perfection from more than a century ago. The mature White Crested Black Polish chicken present a striking contrast in color with its body plumage of lustrous black and crests of white with a few black feathers. The little chicks are cunning with their black bodies and white top hats. They are ideal show fowls. Cackle Hatchery sells the non-bearded variety of the White Crested Black Polish chicken. You will be delighted with these lovely and interesting chickens. They are not only are attractive but useful, as they are fine layers of white eggs and non-setters. Place your order today and we will ship your chicks as soon as possible. For more details give us a call!

History of the Polish Chickens Breed

Truly, the origins of this bird are unclear. There are several anecdotal stories of how it came into Europe.My favorite is that in 1736, the King of Poland was unseated and fled to France. With him, in his ‘luggage,’ he brought his beloved Polish chickens.They became the darlings of French society at the time, being loved by the French aristocracy, and from then on, their future was assured. As romantic as this might seem, it is doubtful to be true.The truth is probably more mundane. The first real mention of them comes from the Netherlands, where they were possibly imported from Spain. It is thought that the name Polish was derived from the old Dutch word ‘pol’ for a large head.There are paintings of the bird from the fifteenth century where it seems to be part of everyday life, so it has been around for a long time. It was declared a thoroughbred in the sixteenth century by the Dutch.The Polish traveled from Europe to England (1700s), eventually finding their way to the USA in 1830-1840.It was initially imported as a good white egg layer but was later surpassed by the white Leghorn for superior egg-laying.It also goes under ‘Paduan,’ ‘Poland,’ or ‘Tophats.’

Polish Chickens Appearance

Polish comes in standard and bantam size, and theThe types, colors, and year of recognition by the APA are as follows:In the later years of the twentieth century, another variety has emerged: The Tolbunt.It’s a stunning mix of white, brown, and black – a real head-turner. The APA does not yet accept this color, but I think it’s only a matter of time.Needless to say, there are many different color mixes and varieties around, but if you want a bird that conforms to the APA, you will have to stick with the colors noted above.

Egg Production

The egg production of polish chickens can be widely variable depending on the line of breeding.If you want a reliable daily egg layer, it would be wise to choose another breed since the Polish are so variable.In general, they lay a fair amount of white, medium/large eggs. The average is around 150 eggs per year. As we have already noted, they will rarely brood, although it is not unknown.I could not find any information on the mother hen’s parenting ability, so I assume it’s a fairly rare occurrence!

You Want An Egg Layer

The Polish are not well known for their egg-laying ability these days, but they do lay a good number of eggs in general, around 200 eggs/year.It takes them a while to get into the swing of lying, but they can lay pretty consistently once they do. If you want an egg-laying machine for your flock – the Polish is not it!If your home flock is packed with assertive breeds such as Rhode Islands, Welsummers’ etc., the Polish may be picked on. They tend to be low in the pecking order because of their docile nature and good temperament – and pulling the head feathers seems to be irresistible to some birds!Due to their visual impairment, the Polish are not equipped and other breeds for free-ranging lifestyles. While they enjoy foraging, they are easy targets for predators as they cannot see them as they attack.Finally, the head feathers are especially prone to lice or mites’ infestations, so the hens need to be checked regularly before the problem becomes especially troublesome.

Temperament

The Polish are generally said to be a calm and gentle bird, suitable for children to have as pets.They can be nervous and flighty, but this is usually attributed to the bird’s head feathers’ visual problems. Talking or whistling on your approach to the bird will alert them that you are coming, and they will be less inclined to startle.Trimming of the feathers around the facial area is frequently necessary for the wellbeing of the bird, not only for the ability to see predators but also to keep feathers out of the eye, leading to an eye infection.The hens rarely go broody, but this can obviously vary from strain to strain.Although many Polish are bred purely for exhibition or ‘eye candy, some breeders have chosen to remain truer to the birds’ origins. These birds are more likely to be better layered and tend toward some broodiness.They are inquisitive birds who like to investigate things, so they can end up ‘stuck’ somewhere and require assistance in getting out. Because of this, they are better kept in confinement which they tolerate really well.If they get separated from the flock and cannot see the others, they will often cry out and respond to the other hens calling them.

Pecking Order

They are low in the pecking order since they have such a mild and calm temperament. Most other chickens can’t resist pulling those head feathers, leading to bald chickens….or worse.Polishes’ are great foragers in the yard and can fly fairly well, so beware of them roosting in trees!They are also pretty hardy, tolerating most climates well, although they don’t handle being wet too well. The crest should be dried if it becomes soaked.Many breeders move their flocks inside a draft-proofed building in areas of freezing and damp winters.They can be kept in most climates, special consideration must be given to their loose feathered areas (such as their bouffants). Ensure they do not become wet and frozen in the winter. Freezing feathers can cause hypothermia and frostbite.If you live in a cold climate, it’s best to keep this bird inside during the severely cold months.

Health Issues and Special Needs

The chicks need to be carefully watched for the first few weeks of life due to the bony head prominence. This prominence does not knit together immediately, so one well-aimed peck to the head could kill or seriously injure the chick.The crest and beard, if present, should be checked frequently and regularly for infestations of lice or mites and treated accordingly. Feathers that impede vision should be trimmed lightly so that the bird can see.If you show or exhibit your birds, cutting the feathers will not be feasible during show season.The Polish chicken doesn’t differ greatly in health problems from any other chicken other than noted above.Folks who show their Polish take great pains and a lot of time. They prepare their birds to be looking their finest on the judging days. If you think you might like to get into showing your birds, contact the Polish Breeders Club.These birds’ docility makes them great project birds for kids to show in local county fairs since the Polish are always a bird that will attract looks and comments from visitors.

Summary of The Polish Chickens

This quirky bird is sure to bring a smile to your face when you see them!They may not be prolific egg layers. But they are certainly worthy of a spot in your flock for the visual appeal alone.They are currently listed as a ‘watch’ status on the American Livestock Breed Conservancy. This means their numbers are low and are being carefully monitored.It would really be a shame if the last King of Poland went to all that trouble only to have his breed become extinct!We hope you will consider adding this beautiful bird to your ‘must have’ list.Polish is a fun chicken to have in your flock. While flighty, they are a great conversation starter for those looking to decorate their flock with this ornamental breed.