White British Shorthair Cat?

The British Shorthair is solid and muscular with an easygoing personality. As befits his British heritage, he is slightly reserved, but once he gets to know someone hes quite affectionate. His short, dense coat comes in many colors and patterns and should be brushed two or three times a week to remove dead hair.

As with so many breeds, British Shorthairs almost died out during World War II, victims of food shortages that left breeders unable to feed their cats. These smiling cats enjoy attention, are normally quiet, but occasionally have bursts of crazed activity before changing back into your affectionate, dignified friend.

Challenge his brain and keep him interested in life by teaching him tricks and providing him with puzzle toys that will reward him with kibble or treats when he learns how to manipulate them. The British Shorthair is generally healthy, but hes prone to hypertophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hemophilia B, a hereditary bleeding disorder. The British Shorthairs plush coat is easy to groom with weekly combing or brushing to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.

Whether youre planning to get your feline friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, dont forget that old adage let the buyer beware. And dont forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy kittens. Sometimes pedigreed cats end up at the shelter after losing their home to an owners death, divorce or change in economic situation.

Wherever you acquire your British Shorthair, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides.

Can British Shorthair cats be white?

There is a great variety of torbie colors. Tortie colors can be found in calico (bi-color) or tri-color variations, tortie with white, torbie with white, tortie color point as well. The color of British cats of the color-point type is distinguished by special color marks.

How much is a white British Shorthair cat?

These cats are quite expensive in the United States. Most breeders sell them for somewhere between $800 and $2,500.

Are British Shorthair cats friendly?

The British Shorthair is a simple breed through and through, with a friendly, quiet character that makes it perfect for keeping with children and animals. These cats are considered to be fairly balanced and people-friendly. They are not particularly acrobatic, with a much calmer nature than some breeds.

What is the rarest color of British Shorthair?

The classic solid colors of the British Shorthair are lilac and blue while black, chocolate, and cream are not very common. Cinnamon, red, and fawn are the rarest and genetically interesting solid colors of the British Shorthair.

The British Shorthair is a compact, well-balanced, and powerful cat, with a short, very dense coat. They often convey an overall impression of balance and proportion in which no feature is exaggerated.

British Shorthair can make great apartment cats, being alert and playful without being hyper or destructive. British Shorthairs tend to show their loyalty to the entire family rather than select one person with whom to bond.

British Shorthairs tend not to be vocal cats; they make tiny squeaking sounds rather than meows, which is quite humorous coming from those burly bodies. They make up for it by some of the loudest purring youve ever heard; British Shorthairs are often known for their motor boat type purrs. British Shorthairs dislike being picked up, and tolerate it with legs stiffly stretched out to push you away.

This breed, whose appearance is much different from the Brits youll see today, came to Great Britain some 2,000 years ago, courtesy of the Roman Empire. As they conquered and colonized other lands, the Romans brought cats along with them to protect their homes from rodents. Eventually, however, Phoenician caravans transported them along trade routes, and Roman armies smuggled them out of Egypt and carried them along to many lands.

Although the Phoenicians first introduced cats to England, the Romans were most likely responsible for their widespread establishment when Rome invaded the British Isles. Lithe with long, elegant bones, these cats were sandy brown or yellow-gray in color, with ticked coats like the Abyssinian and tabby markings on their face, legs, and tail. They were probably members of, or closely related to, the African wildcat, Felis silvestris lybica, the progenitor of all domestic cats.

Because of the colder and wetter conditions, the cats in Europe developed stocky, muscular body styles and thicker, water-repelling coats that were favorable to the climate. For hundreds of years, these cats earned their livings protecting from rodents in Great Britains barns, granaries, alleys, gardens, and households. In the 1800s, residents started to appreciate these hardy alley cats for their beauty, strength, personality, and their value as companions.

In 1970, ACFA recognized the breed for championship in only one colorsolid blueand under the now obsolete name British Blue. Blue was, and still is, the most common color both here and in Great Britain. Medium length in proportion to the body, thicker at base, tapering slightly to a rounded tip.

One of the most popular cat breeds in the world, the British shorthair is appropriately named. Not only do they have a thick, plush short coat, they also have a friendly yet no-nonsensethat is, rather Britishsensibility about life. British shorthairs make ideal family cats and enjoy being with their owners, but may turn up their noses at being held or cuddled too much.

This beautiful breed comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns, but the traditional British shorthair is wrapped in blue fur. Besides being treasured for their easygoing attitude about life, British shorthairs are beloved for their thick, dense coats that come in almost any color or pattern.

But aside from their common blue coat, this breed is easy to recognize because of their thick legs, broad chests, rounded heads, and chubby cheeks that are totally pinchable. These cats have a wide range of coat colors and patterns, but blue British shorthairs are the most popular. These gorgeous cats only require a quick brushing once a week to keep their coat free of loose hair and dirt.

British shorthairs are a large cat breed , with males potentially tipping the scales at 17 pounds. When it comes to temperament, British shorthairs are hard to beat: They’re active without being boisterous, they’re affectionate without being cloying, and they’re smart but don’t feel the need to show off by figuring out how to open your refrigerator. Right: Even if they don’t have blue fur, British shorthairs are instantly recognizable by their round heads and chubby cheeks.

This happy breed loves a good romp as much as a night stretched out in front of the television. British shorthairs are ambiverts: They thrive on attention, but also value personal space and may turn up their noses at being held or hugged too much. Like most cats, British shorthairs aren’t too fussy about where they liveas long as they have loving owners who take the time to interact with them.

This means he’s always up for a game of chase-the-little-red-laser-beam, but you won’t have to worry about him getting into trouble while you’re at work (especially if you give him plenty of toys for entertainment). Because British shorthairs are a larger cat breed, make sure to buy at least two oversized litter pans to comfortably accommodate your pet when he’s fully grown. A good rule to follow when choosing a litter box : It should be as wide as your cat is from his nose to the base of his tail and about half as long.

Their short, soft, dense coat only requires weekly brushing to remove dead hair and skin cells. British shorthairs are active without being boisterous, they’re affectionate without being cloying, and they’re smart but don’t feel the need to show off by figuring out how to open your refrigerator. These kitties can be prone to a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy , which is a thickening of the muscular walls of the cat‘s heart; this causes difficulty breathing, lethargy, and loss of appetite in older animals.

To help prevent health problems from developing, start by getting your British shorthair kitten from a reputable breeder who uses healthy adults. In addition to regular health check-ups, exercise should play an important role in your British shorthair‘s life. These cats have energy but aren’t that active, so they can gain too much weight (especially in their later years ) unless you develop strategies that keep them moving when they’re young.

Over the years, according to The Cat Fanciers’ Association , they developed round faces with short, thick coats of all colors. In the late 1800s, a determined cat breeder named Harrison Weir began developing the British shorthair officially by crossing different individual felines. With his chubby cheeks and big green eyes, Puss in Boots is generally considered to be a British shorthair (despite his Spanish accent).

Choosing a British Shorthair Breeder

You want your British Shorthair to be happy and healthy so you can enjoy your time with him, so do your homework before you bring him home. For more information on the history, personality and looks of the British Shorthair, or to find breeders, visit the websites of the Cat Fanciers Association, Cats Center Stage, the Fanciers Breeder Referral List and The International Cat Association.
A reputable breeder will abide by a code of ethics that prohibits sales to pet stores and wholesalers and outlines the breeder’s responsibilities to their cats and to buyers. Choose a breeder who has performed the health certifications necessary to screen out genetic health problems to the extent that is possible, as well as one who raises kittens in the home. Kittens who are isolated can become fearful and skittish and may be difficult to socialize later in life.
Lots of reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include kittens always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any kitten, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your feline friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and unhealthy catteries can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick kitten, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy kittens.
Put at least as much effort into researching your kitten as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Be patient. Depending on what you are looking for, you may have to wait six months or more for the right kitten to be available. Many breeders don’t release kittens to new homes until they are between 12 and 16 weeks of age.
Before you buy a kitten, consider whether an adult British Shorthair might be a better choice for your lifestyle. Kittens are loads of fun, but they’re also a lot of work and can be destructive until they reach a somewhat more sedate adulthood. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health. If you are interested in acquiring an adult cat instead of a kitten, ask breeders about purchasing a retired show or breeding cat or if they know of an adult cat who needs a new home.

Personality

If you’re looking for a cat that will loot your refrigerator and swing dizzily from your chandeliers, then the British Shorthair is not for you. Some say the British Shorthair is the perfect household companion if you like a breed that’s undemanding, not always underfoot or in your face. British Shorthairs like to keep a low profile; they are affectionate but not clingy, playful but not overactive. They are quiet, even-tempered, and undemanding with a bit of typical British reticence, particularly when they’re first introduced.When they get over their initial reserve, however, they become extremely faithful companions. British Shorthair need love and attention if they are to become the loyal, loving companions they can be; the more attention and affection you give them, the more they will repay you in kind. Once they get to know and trust you, British Shorthair are confident and devoted, and enjoy following you from room to room to keep an eye on your activities. They are calm, quiet companions, appreciating quality time without demanding your total attention.British Shorthair can make great apartment cats, being alert and playful without being hyper or destructive. British Shorthairs tend to show their loyalty to the entire family rather than select one person with whom to bond. They tend to be more independent than many breeds and usually adapt well to most situations. British Shorthairs tend not to be vocal cats; they make tiny squeaking sounds rather than meows, which is quite humorous coming from those burly bodies. They make up for it by some of the loudest purring you’ve ever heard; British Shorthairs are often known for their motor boat type purrs.One thing Brits are not, however, is lap cats. They’d much rather sit beside you, or curl up at your feet, than cuddle on your lap. British Shorthairs dislike being picked up, and tolerate it with legs stiffly stretched out to push you away. They detest being kissed, too, but head presses are acceptable, and they accept petting with great enthusiasm and mighty purrs of appreciation. They get along with other animals in the home, including dogs as long as the proper introductions are made. British Shorthairs are at their very best with children, and children love these plush smiling friends.

History

The British Shorthair is native to Great Britain in the same way that the American Shorthair is native to America—long ago it was transported there from somewhere else. However, the progenitor of the Brit, as it’s affectionately called, is probably Great Britain’s oldest natural breed of cat, and was roaming around Great Britain for centuries before its cousin journeyed to the New World.In many ways, the British Shorthair’s struggle for recognition resembles the American Shorthair’s in North America. Both began as working cats and weren’t appreciated as the special breeds they are for many years. The British Shorthair originated from a common street cat once called the European Shorthair. This breed, whose appearance is much different from the Brits you’ll see today, came to Great Britain some 2,000 years ago, courtesy of the Roman Empire. As they conquered and colonized other lands, the Romans brought cats along with them to protect their homes from rodents. These cats had been obtained from the Egyptians, who were very tight-pawed with their treasured felines. Eventually, however, Phoenician caravans transported them along trade routes, and Roman armies smuggled them out of Egypt and carried them along to many lands. Although the Phoenicians first introduced cats to England, the Romans were most likely responsible for their widespread establishment when Rome invaded the British Isles. Eventually, the Romans were driven from the Isles, but the cats they had brought with them remained.The cats left behind didn’t look like today’s British Shorthair. Lithe with long, elegant bones, these cats were sandy brown or yellow-gray in color, with ticked coats like the Abyssinian and tabby markings on their face, legs, and tail. They were probably members of, or closely related to, the African wildcat, Felis silvestris lybica, the progenitor of all domestic cats. After arriving in Europe, however, they mixed with the European wildcat, Felis silvestris silvestris, a local wildcat subspecies inhabiting most of Europe. This caused a shift in both coat and body style, since the European wildcat has a broad head, small wide-set ears, a sturdy, muscular body, and short, thick fur.Some European wildcats bear the mackerel tabby pattern; this common tabby pattern found today in so many breeds and mixed-bred cats may have arisen from the European wildcat. Because of the colder and wetter conditions, the cats in Europe developed stocky, muscular body styles and thicker, water-repelling coats that were favorable to the climate. For hundreds of years, these cats earned their livings protecting from rodents in Great Britain’s barns, granaries, alleys, gardens, and households. From these working cats, the British Shorthair developed into a stalwart, substantial breed. In the 1800s, residents started to appreciate these hardy alley cats for their beauty, strength, personality, and their value as companions.Blue British Shorthairs, at first simply called “Shorthairs,” were favorites of cat enthusiast Harrison Weir. Mr. Weir was instrumental in getting the British Shorthair recognized as a breed in its own right. While they became popular for some time there after, just before the turn of the century, longhaired exotics caught people’s eye and British Shorthairs declined in popularity. Nevertheless, British Shorthairs held their own until the chaos of World War II decimated the breed, along with most other European breeds as well. After the war, efforts were dedicated to preserving the British Shorthair breed. It took many generations to bring the breed back to their former glory, but eventually they prevailed.Americans took little notice of the British Shorthair until the 1960s. In 1970, ACFA recognized the breed for championship in only one color—solid blue—and under the now obsolete name “British Blue.” Blue was, and still is, the most common color both here and in Great Britain. The breed slowly earned supporters, and between 1970 and 1980 British Shorthairs were officially recognized in all the many colors of the breed. Today, the British Shorthair has an active following. In Great Britain, the breed also has many fans.

Body

Medium to large, well-knit, and powerful. Level back and a deep broad chest.

Head

Round and massive. Round face with round underlying bone structure well set on short thick neck. Forehead is often rounded with slight flat plane on top of head. Nose is medium, broad. In profile there is a gentle dip. Chin is firm, well-developed in line with nose and upper lip. Muzzle is distinctive, well-developed, with definite stop beyond large, round whisker pads.

Ears

Medium in size, broad at the base, rounded at the tips. Set far apart, fitting into rounded contour of the head.

Eyes

Large, round, well opened. Set wide apart and level. Eye color depends upon coat color.

Legs & Paws

Legs short to medium, well-boned, and strong. In proportion to the body. Forelegs are straight. Paws round and firm. Toes five in front

Tail

Medium length in proportion to the body, thicker at base, tapering slightly to a rounded tip.

Coat

Short, very dense, well bodied and firm to the touch. Not double coated or woolly.

Color

Any other color or pattern with the exception of those showing evidence of hybridization resulting in the colors chocolate, lavender, the Himalayan pattern, or these combinations with white.

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British Shorthair

One of the most popular cat breeds in the world, the British shorthair is appropriately named. Not only do they have a thick, plush short coat, they also have a friendly yet no-nonsense—that is, rather British—sensibility about life. British shorthairs make ideal family cats and enjoy being with their owners, but may turn up their noses at being held or cuddled too much.This beautiful breed comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns, but the traditional British shorthair is wrapped in blue fur. The best part: This medium-to-large-sized cat has few health problems.

Appearance

Besides being treasured for their easygoing attitude about life, British shorthairs are beloved for their thick, dense coats that come in almost any color or pattern. Blue-gray cats, often called British blues, are probably the most popular color choice of British shorthair fanciers.But aside from their common blue coat, this breed is easy to recognize because of their thick legs, broad chests, rounded heads, and chubby cheeks that are totally pinchable. British shorthairs with blue coats have bold orange-amber eyes, but individuals with other coat colors can have green, copper, amber, or blue eyes.These gorgeous cats only require a quick brushing once a week to keep their coat free of loose hair and dirt. British shorthairs are a large cat breed, with males potentially tipping the scales at 17 pounds.

Temperament

When it comes to temperament, British shorthairs are hard to beat: They’re active without being boisterous, they’re affectionate without being cloying, and they’re smart but don’t feel the need to show off by figuring out how to open your refrigerator. British shorthair cats are easygoing and will treat everyone in the family (including dogs and other cats) like a good friend, especially if socialized as kittens.This happy breed loves a good romp as much as a night stretched out in front of the television. British shorthairs are ambiverts: They thrive on attention, but also value personal space and may turn up their noses at being held or hugged too much.Marilyn Krieger, a certified cat behavior consultant in San Francisco, gives top marks to this cat breed. “They are sweet, laid back, and are loyal companions,” she says.

Living Needs

Like most cats, British shorthairs aren’t too fussy about where they live—as long as they have loving owners who take the time to interact with them. British shorthairs are a happy medium between playful and just wanting to snooze in the sun all day. This means he’s always up for a game of chase-the-little-red-laser-beam, but you won’t have to worry about him getting into trouble while you’re at work (especially if you give him plenty of toys for entertainment).Because British shorthairs are a larger cat breed, make sure to buy at least two oversized litter pans to comfortably accommodate your pet when he’s fully grown. A good rule to follow when choosing a litter box: It should be as wide as your cat is from his nose to the base of his tail and about half as long.Like most cats, a British shorthair enjoys a cat tree (or two!) so he can scratch, stretch, and chatter at the window in comfort.

Care

Unlike long-haired cats, British shorthairs don’t need to be fussed over to look good. Their short, soft, dense coat only requires weekly brushing to remove dead hair and skin cells. But for the most part, they do a good job keeping themselves clean and tidy.Like other breeds, British shorthairs need frequent nail trims and dental care, as well as regular trips to the veterinarian. Be sure to spay or neuter your pet and keep their vaccinations up to date, as instructed by your vet. Check their ears regularly for wax build-up or possible ear mites as well. It’s also important to keep their litter boxes clean so they don’t turn their nose up at it.

Health

British shorthairs are a large, healthy breed that can live up to 20 years. However, they are susceptible to certain health problems, as all breeds are.These kitties can be prone to a condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is a thickening of the muscular walls of the cat‘s heart; this causes difficulty breathing, lethargy, and loss of appetite in older animals. And, similar to other breeds, British shorthairs can develop urinary tract and kidney issues.To help prevent health problems from developing, start by getting your British shorthair kitten from a reputable breeder who uses healthy adults. And always take your cat to your vet once a year for a check-up.In addition to regular health check-ups, exercise should play an important role in your British shorthair‘s life. These cats have energy but aren’t

History

An ancient breed, British shorthairs are believed to be the direct descendants of the cats brought to England by the invading Romans, according to The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy. They were used for vermin control and quickly spread throughout the country as street and farm cats. Soon, their calm and confident personalities prompted people to welcome them into their homes (and onto their laps). Over the years, according to The Cat Fanciers’ Association, they developed round faces with short, thick coats of all colors.In the late 1800s, a determined cat breeder named Harrison Weir began developing the British shorthair officially by crossing different individual felines. At the first organized cat show, held at London’s Crystal Palace in 1871, a blue tabby British shorthair owned by Weir won Best in Show.After World War I, the British shorthair we know today was finessed by adding Persian, Russian blue, French Chartreux, and domestic shorthair cats into the mix. Eventually, in the 1970s, the British shorthair was given formal recognition around the globe.