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We use the word peacock to refer to the entire species, but the correct name for the pheasant is peafowl. Peafowl are native to India, Southeast Asia and Central Africa — not the U.S., although there is a large, growing population in Florida. All it takes is for a few birds to escape captivity, and they will quickly breed and multiply.

Florida’s west coast, including many towns along the Gulf of Mexico, are among the areas that are most populated with the birds. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has reported receiving dozens of calls from angry residents about peacocks across the state. They knock out patio screens, their feathers clog air conditioning units, they will walk into homes if doors are left open. Many people say they don’t mind the birds because they’re a beautiful tourist attraction that prospective homebuyers love to see in a neighborhood.

Do peacocks live in the United States?

Peafowl are native to India, Southeast Asia and Central Africa — not the U.S., although there is a large, growing population in Florida. All it takes is for a few birds to escape captivity, and they will quickly breed and multiply.

Where do peacocks live mostly?

All peacocks are believed to have originated in Asia, but they now inhabit Africa and parts of Australia. They are most common in India. Peacocks live in deserts, dry savannas, forests and dense foliage areas. There are three main types of peacock, the Indian peacock, the African Congo peacock and the Green peacock.

What kind of trees do peacocks live in?

The Peafowls’ Wild. Peafowl prefer warm climates. Their ideal habitat is an open tropical seasonal forest with trees for roosting.

Are peacocks in the jungle?

Peacocks are usually found in tropical forests where they feed on plant parts, seeds, flower petals and insects.

Peacocks live in dense, forested areas where they roost in trees and gather together in flocks called “parties.” The two most recognizable peacocks are the blue peacock, which is endemic to Sri Lanka and the green peacock that lives in Myanmar and the Indonesian island of Java. Another species, The Congo peacock, lives in the African jungle.

Wild peafowl prefer to live in forests with easy access to rivers and streams, which makes it easier to find water and stay cool during warm weather. If the domestic climate is cooler than what peafowl are used to, electric heaters or other types of heat sources are typically installed in the enclosure.

The tropical forest is dry, but the air is sticky with the nearness of the river and the coming rains. Dead leaves crumble underfoot, returning their substance to the baked soil. Suddenly, leafless branches thrash close overhead; insect murmurs and monkey chatter go silent; there’s a raucous scream. A murder? An ape? Nope. It’s a peacock.

The classic blue Indian peacock’s unique claim to fame is his magnificent arc of 3-foot tail feathers in gleaming metallic colorts, each topped by a brilliant eyespot placed there, legend says, by an ancient Greek goddess. The truly spectacular white peacock is a genetic mutation that occurs in the Indian blue. They also like living within a convenient distance of vegetable gardens and fruit orchards, but not too close to humans. To keep a muster of peafowl — one peacock and up to five peahens — in an enclosed space requires a minimum of 80 square feet per bird. Protect against escape and against flying predators with a covered top and perhaps even an electrified wire barrier to deter large intruders. Peafowl usually drink once a day in the wild, but caged birds need access to clean, fresh water all the time. As their omnivorous wild diet ranges from seeds and plants to bugs and snakes, an appropriate menu for a captive would include a grain mix formulated for game birds, or a commercial turkey food, mixed with fresh fruits and vegetables, insects such as crickets or mealworms, and a supplement mixture of crushed shells, gravel and appropriate vitamins. Serve their food in elevated troughs or bowls, and clean up scattered leftovers to discourage pests.

Nowadays we’re very used to seeing peacocks in parks and gardens in almost every continent. Their popularity is in a large part owed to their striking plumage and docile nature. In fact, peafowl were artificially introduced to most of these areas centuries to keep as decoration.

The blue peacock ( Pavo cristatus ) comes originally from India and the island of Ceylon (Sri Lanka). However, the probability of finding groups of wild peacocks is not restricted to that geographical area, but rather throughout the habitat in which the species can thrive. They are found in the wild in India, but also in Myanmar, China, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia and Java. Their habitat is more tropical than that of the blue peacock; it has been widely destroyed and reduced, which is why the green peafowl is an endangered species. Peafowl eat berries, seeds, tender shoots, insects and even small reptiles, generally snakes. When other peoples started to travel to India, they became just as enamored with the beautiful birds as the local population. When the British Raj took control of India, it was common for them to send birds back to their homeland to be displayed to the public. In the Middle Ages, they were eaten as food in Europe, a practice which still takes place today in parts of China. Namely, so that they can come across each other during mating season, in which male peacocks compete between themselves with dances that end with the tail feathers being spread in an explosion of color.

Peacocks of Florida Causing Problems

Residents in many parts of Florida have been complaining about the growing peacock population for years. Neighborhoods from Cape Canaveral down to Miami have been overrun. Florida’s west coast, including many towns along the Gulf of Mexico, are among the areas that are most populated with the birds. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has reported receiving dozens of calls from angry residents about peacocks across the state.

Issues Peacocks Cause

Most Florida residents with wild peacocks around their home complain about them walking around their front yards, invading their backyards and even walking on their roof. The birds are noisy, and squawk loudly — even in the middle of the night. They knock out patio screens, their feathers clog air conditioning units, they will walk into homes if doors are left open. They also scratch cars and have even attacked dogs. Their droppings are found everywhere, such as in pools, and can make children sick.

A Growing Issue, Hard to Control

Peacocks are not endangered, but they’re protected by Florida authorities, who say that Florida is the bird’s habitat. Some communities control populations by moving the birds, and others have tried a contraceptive pill. These solutions haven’t been perfect, however, because populations can multiply again so quickly.One example is Longbeach Village in Longboat Key. The town has reduced its population of 150 birds down to 12 every year since 2008, but these efforts have proven useless because the number of birds quickly grows again. A couple in Redlands, Florida reported having 130 birds around their home in 2009. They were working with a local non-profit conservation group, Vanishing Species, to relocate the birds. The couple says that when they purchased the house 18 years earlier, there were just two peacocks.

The Peafowl Rainbow

The classic blue Indian peacock’s unique claim to fame is his magnificent arc of 3-foot tail feathers in gleaming metallic colorts, each topped by a brilliant eyespot placed there, legend says, by an ancient Greek goddess. The truly spectacular white peacock is a genetic mutation that occurs in the Indian blue. The green peacock, a brilliant green who comes from Java, Burma or Indochina, is rare and endangered. The Congo peacock is much less colorful than his distant relatives. Very little is known about him.

The Peafowls’ Wild

Peafowl prefer warm climates. Their ideal habitat is an open tropical seasonal forest with trees for roosting. They usually settle near all-season water sources such as rivers and creeks. They also like living within a convenient distance of vegetable gardens and fruit orchards, but not too close to humans.

The Domestic Domain

To keep aThe enclosure should be landscaped with bushes and shrubbery to provide hiding places. It should be protected from digging predators by underground fencing and from climbing predators by high fencing. Protect against escape and against flying predators with a covered top and perhaps even an electrified wire barrier to deter large intruders.The birds need a covered area in which to retire from rain or snow. If the climate requires it, provide an insulated or heated space.The captive habitat should contain a roosting area for the birds to sleep in. They fly into the trees to roost in the wild, so they need elevated perches to overnight on. Use wooden dowels with a diameter that fits their feet — metal might freeze their feet in winter.Peahens nest on the ground in the wild, but in captivity they will use a communal nesting box if you’ll provide one; remove eggs daily to encourage its use.

Where Do Peacocks Live?

Nowadays we’re very used to seeing peacocks in parks and gardens in almost every continent. Their popularity is in a large part owed to theirIn this AnimalWised article, we ask

The origin of wild peafowl

If you wonder why we keep mentioning peafowl in our article on where do peacocks live, we should clarify. Peafowl is the type of animal, butNow that this is clear, where do peafowl originate?There are two species of peafowl, both of them native to South Asia. TheTheThe green and blue peafowl are of the same genera, but there is another genera in the same family made of one species known as theWhen we findPeafowl eat berries, seeds, tender shoots, insects and even small reptiles, generally snakes. Taking into account their omnivorous diet, they’re a versatile and adaptable species. The dietary habits of the peacock means they are, essentially,

Peafowl in captivity

However, although we knowWhen other peoples started to travel to India, they became just as enamored with the beautiful birds as the local population. In fact, it is believed that Alexander the Great took some home with him when he conquered the Northwest of IndiaWhen the British Raj took control of India, it was common for them to send birds back to their homeland to be displayed to the public. Peacocks were also given as gifts to nobility as they conferred a major social status. It is still common for wealthy families to keep peacocks as pets if they have the suitable space to keep them. In the Middle Ages, they were

Why are there no wild peacock populations outside of their native lands?

Zoos and aviaries across the world have kept peafowl for years. They often let them roam around the territory as they are not generally dangerous to the public due to their docileHowever, peacocks do not generally fare well outside theirThere may be some small

In search of a suitable habitat

PeafowlPeafowl use tree branches as resting places, which offer protection from some of their natural predators. Peacocks also need to have some water nearby, where they mainly go to drink during the mornings. Peafowl cannot live in cold climates, and their

Peafowl are gregarious birds

Peafowl