What to Do if Your Cat’s Eye Is Swollen?

This is a question that more than 5126 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva, which is the inside of the eyelids and the whites of the eye. A cat with conjunctivitis will often appear to have a red, swollen and partially or completely closed eye. The condition is very uncomfortable for the cat and it can progress to problems associated with self-trauma to the area, as well as inflammation inside the eye that is more painful and difficult to treat. It is vital that you seek veterinary assistance if you notice that your cat’s eye looks to be affected.

It is very contagious and can be contracted by either direct contact between cats or via infected food bowls or bedding. Foreign bodies, such as grass seeds as well as cat scratches to the surface of the eye, can lead to corneal ulcers which then results in conjunctivitis. The common signs of conjunctivitis include a red, swollen, irritated and painful eye. Any information you can give your vet about your cat’s eye, general health and their behaviour will help with the eventual diagnosis. Placing an orange coloured stain called fluroscene in the eye to check for corneal ulcers. Checking for other clinical signs such as sneezing, nasal discharge, oral ulceration, inappetence or a high temperature. Oral antibiotics – specifically ones that concentrate well in the tear film and/or the respiratory tract if cat flu is present. If cat flu is diagnosed then often there is a long term treatment and management plan established to prevent a recurrence.

How can I treat my cats swollen eye at home?

Dip a cotton ball in water. Wipe away the eye discharge, always from the corner of the eye outward. Use a fresh cotton ball for each eye..Steer clear of any over-the-counter drops or washes unless your vet has prescribed them.

Will my cats swollen eye go away on its own?

Treatment of Eye Inflammation in Cats. In many mild cases of conjunctivitis that have no infectious cause, the condition may clear up on its own. However, it’s unwise to delay veterinary treatment based on this fact, as the conjunctivitis may be a symptom of another, more serious condition.

Why is my cat keeping one eye closed and swollen?

An eye infection (conjunctivitis) – causing inflammation, itching and discharge. Something irritating – such as smoke, dust, sand, wind and chemicals. An allergic reaction – often causes severe swelling around the eyes and in other parts of the body. Glaucoma – increased pressure in the eye.

Your cat’s eyes, usually clear and bright, are looking a little gooey. They might be pawing at them or rubbing their face against the sofa or on the rug. Clearly, something’s wrong.

A frequent cause of eye discharge in cats, these can include viruses such as feline calicivirus, a contagious respiratory disease, pneumonitis or rhinotracheitis (herpesvirus), bacteria, and protozoa. Conjunctivitis with fever , diarrhea , and trouble breathing can point to potentially fatal feline infectious peritonitis, though this isn’t very common. Specific treatments depend on the cause of the infection as well as how serious it is and may include eye medications, antibiotics , decongestants, and fluids. Under general anesthesia , your vet may use plain water or saline to flush your cat’s blocked tear duct. Secondary bacterial infections, which can cause pneumonia and other serious issues, are common with calicivirus, so always call your vet if you suspect your cat has this disease. To safely remove your cat’s eye discharge and make them more comfortable while waiting for their vet appointment, arm yourself with a bag of cotton balls and these simple tips from the ASPCA: Because correct treatment can be so critical to the health and well-being of your cat, always talk to a veterinarian to be sure kitty is getting just the right care needed. North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine: “Ophthalmology – Special Services, Technology, & Information: Feline Herpes Virus.” Cat Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook, by Delbert G. Carlson DVM, James M. Griffin.

A cat’s eyes are beautiful, expressive, and provide important indicators when they aren’t feeling well. Eye infections in cats are very common, with some infections easily clearing up on their own, and some showing signs of a more serious illness. Knowing the most common causes and symptoms for cat eye infections can help you prevent them – or quickly deal with them – if you ever find your cat looking at you with weepy or gunky eyes.

Second, cats only need 1/6th of the light we do because they have a gel-like substance in the back of their eye called a tapetum lucidum (Image). With these complex anatomy additions, your cat’s eyes are critical for navigating their world – making it all the more important to keep them healthy. A healthy cat’s eyes are clear, bright, the pupils are both the same size, and there’s no excessive discharge or puffiness. Common allergens: Fleas Pollens Chemicals Smoke Shampoo Ear mites and other parasites Symptoms: Excessive itching or scratching – flea allergies can happen with a single bite Watery or runny eyes or nose Sudden snoring – when the back of the throat gets inflamed Diagnosis & Treatment: Blood or urine tests to rule out bacteria or parasites Cultures or allergen tests to determine the type of allergy Eye drops or ointments may be prescribed to decrease inflammation and heal the infection Conjunctivitis is a common reason for your cat’s eyes to be red and inflamed. Conjunctivitis, or Conjunctiva , is the inflammation of the thin mucous membrane on the outer surface of the eye. When it gets irritated by foreign bodies, infected, or injured, it can get red and uncomfortable. Whether the Conjunctivitis is bacterial, viral, or fungi based, it can be cleared up quickly with a vet visit, diagnosis, and treatment. Diagnosis & Treatment: A culture or specimen to determine the origin of the infection Blood or urine samples to confirm infection Eye drops or topical ointments applied to the eyes to reduce inflammation and heal the eyes Oral antibiotics or anti-viral medications may be prescribed if an infection or fungus is present Other cats will be carriers and show no symptoms because the virus lies dormant in their systems. Symptoms: Upper respiratory symptoms – coughing, runny nose, or sneezing Conjunctivitis – swelling or inflammation of the outer lining of the eye Corneal ulcerations – these are serious eye issues that need immediate vet attention to maintain vision in your kitty Diagnosis & Treatment: Blood and urine samples to detect if an ulcer or injury is present Eye drops or a topical ointment to ease symptoms and heal infections Oral antibiotics or antiviral medications to treat an upper respiratory infection if present Lowering stress as stress can activate the virus Lysine vitamin supplements may help reduce or eliminate virus flares It can be caused by allergic reactions (like to a flea bite) tumors, trauma to the eyelid, and other conditions like diabetes. Diagnosis & Treatment: Examination of the eyelids and surrounding areas to determine the presence and extent of inflammation, plus the cause of the infection Blood or urine tests and possibly cultures or biopsies to detect if an infection is present Clean around the eyes while they’re healing with cotton balls wet with warm water Apply warm compresses to the area to help soothe the eyes Get an Elizabethan collar (Blepharitis can be very itchy) to protect the eyes during the healing process Topical ointments and eye drops may be prescribed to treat inflammation or infection Oral antibiotics if needed, but the underlying cause should be addressed for a longer-term solution Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca…a really intimidating word that simply means dry eyes. It can be a secondary bacterial infection of FVH-1, but can also crop up with Conjunctivitis, allergies, or for genetic reasons. Tears have antibacterial properties in them and protect the eyes by flushing irritants and providing lubrication. Having a dry eye condition is very uncomfortable and can cause severe issues if not treated. Luckily, it’s relatively easy to provide comfort to your kitty if this is the problem, but dry eyes are usually not curable. Bacteria, viruses, fungus, and allergies can all threaten your cat’s amazing vision talents. So if you look at your beloved kitty and notice their eyes are not as clear and beautiful as they usually are, maybe it’s time to see your vet. With the right treatment and insurance to help cover it, your cat will be back to their old tricks and talents in no time.

Conjunctivitis in cats

Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva, which is the inside of the eyelids and the whites of the eye. A cat with conjunctivitis will often appear to have a red, swollen and partially or completely closed eye. The condition is very uncomfortable for the cat and it can progress to problems associated with self-trauma to the area, as well as inflammation inside the eye that is more painful and difficult to treat. It is vital that you seek veterinary assistance if you notice that your cat’s eye looks to be affected.

Causes

The most common cause of conjunctivitis in cats is due to cat flu. There are a number of pathogens associated with cat flu, with the most common being feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus and a chlamydial (bacterial) infection. Herpes viruses re-emerge when cats are stressed or immuno-compromised (eg. have feline AIDS) so often there is an under-lying illness or sometimes a behavioural issue (eg. an anxious cat having a new cat introduced into the household).Cat flu is transferred in infected discharge from the eyes and nose. It is very contagious and can be contracted by either direct contact between cats or via infected food bowls or bedding. Pure breed and shelter cats are more likely to experience cat flu as they have a higher likelihood of exposure.Conjunctivitis can also be seen when cats have reactions to various allergens such as plant pollens, fleas and foods. Foreign bodies, such as grass seeds as well as cat scratches to the surface of the eye, can lead to corneal ulcers which then results in conjunctivitis. The loss of the supporting fat pad behind the eye in cats that lose a lot of weight due to illness, can cause the eyeball to sink into the eye socket and the eyelids to roll under. This causes the fur to rub on the surface of the eye causing irritation which can lead to conjunctivitis.

Signs/Symptoms

The common signs of conjunctivitis include a red, swollen, irritated and painful eye. The third eyelid that is located on the inside of the eye may protrude as it too becomes inflamed and swollen. You may notice a white, green or clear discharge from the eye. If your cat is affected by cat flu you will most likely notice signs such as sneezing, lethargy and inappetence due to ulcers on the tongue and gums. You may be able to observe some changes to the surface of the eye due to inflammation or ulceration (erosions of the surface of the eye).

Diagnosis

Clinical examination

Any information you can give your vet about your cat’s eye, general health and their behaviour will help with the eventual diagnosis.Some of the questions that you may be asked include:

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A healthy cat’s eyes should be bright and clear.Eye problems can bring out another cat entirely, one who paws at their eyes, squints, or blinks excessively. Because eye problems can lead to devastating consequences — including surgery or blindness — always talk to your vet when you notice your cat has irritated eyes. A few common reasons for cat eye discharge include:

When to See a Vet

Because so many conditions can lead to eye discharge in cats, you really need to talk to your veterinarian before trying any eye discharge treatments on your cat.Depending on what your veterinarian finds, treatment for cat eye discharge might include:

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How will I know if my cat is having eye problems?

A healthy cat’s eyes are clear, bright, the pupils are both the same size, and there’s no excessive discharge or puffiness. When you look at your feline friend’s eyes, there should be no cloudiness and you should not see the third eyelid. If your kitty’s eyes don’t look as healthy as they should, they could be suffering from an eye infection.Let’s look at some common types of eye infections in cats, and their causes.

Allergies: If your cat is sneezing, this could be why.

Cats get allergies just like dogs and humans do. Allergies can come from many sources and need a vet’s diagnosis to confirm them.

Symptoms:

Conjunctivitis: Yes, cats can get Pink Eye, too.

Diagnosis & Treatment:

Feline Herpesvirus (FHV-1): It’s not just a cold.

Most cats have at one time or another been exposed to Feline Herpesvirus. Some cats will show symptoms for the virus. Other cats will be carriers and show no symptoms because the virus lies dormant in their systems.The virus can activate at any time, especially when a cat is stressed. Unfortunately, there’s no cure, but FHV-1 can be managed to make the cat more comfortable and minimize flare-ups.

Diagnosis & Treatment:

Blepharitis: There’s a reason for those puffy eyes.

Blepharitis is an inflammation and infection of the eyelids. It can also involve the muscles, connective tissues, and glands of the eye. It’s more common in flat-faced cats like Persians and Himalayans, but other breeds of cat can get it, too. It can be caused by allergic reactions (like to a flea bite) tumors, trauma to the eyelid, and other conditions like diabetes. Your cat’s own hair can also cause Blepharitis if it irritates their eyes!

Diagnosis & Treatment:

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca: This is also known as Dry Eyes or Keratitis.

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca…a really intimidating word that simply means dry eyes. It can be a secondary bacterial infection of FVH-1, but can also crop up with Conjunctivitis, allergies, or for genetic reasons.Tears have antibacterial properties in them and protect the eyes by flushing irritants and providing lubrication. Having a dry eye condition is very uncomfortable and can cause severe issues if not treated. Luckily, it’s relatively easy to provide comfort to your kitty if this is the problem, but dry eyes are usually not curable. You will need to manage the symptoms to keep your feline buddy comfortable.

Treatment:

Rebecca Ussery
I just don't see how a two peckered billy goat can be that productive...jus' sayin' I was getting a lot of editorial. Bacon advocate. Organizer. Travelaholic. Tv fanatic. Amateur entrepreneur. Internet nerd. Gamer. Interests: Photography, Painting and Drawing
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