What Size Litter Box for Cat?

When answering what size litter box does a cat need, most sources use statements like, it depends on your cats preferences, it depends on your cats size, the larger, the better if youre to avoid litter box problems, and similar. Of course, they are right, it does depend on many things, yet there is also a straightforward approach.

And, even one box that had a sticker with the word mega on it was just 24 inches long, which is slightly less than recommended. In general, you are back to the bigger, the better because even if you buy the largest litter box in the pet store, you may fall short.

We loved how Pam Johnson-Bennett, a certified pet behavior consultant and an award-winning cat book author, recommends getting a large, plastic storage container and making a litter box out of it by cutting one of the edges lower.

How do you know if your cat's litter box is too small?

A litter box should allow your cat to turn around easily. If the box is too small, your cat may refuse to use it or urinate over the edge onto the floor. Choose the right height.

Do cats like big litter boxes?

Cats prefer clean, large, uncovered litter boxes. Ideally, they are at least one-and-a-half times the length of the cat — big enough for the kitty to comfortably fit and turn around in. … The high sides accommodate cats who enthusiastically dig in the litter and those who prefer to stand while going to the bathroom.

Even if your cat goes out regularly and does the majority of his business while outdoors, you should have a cat litter box in the house so that your feline friend has somewhere to go even during the night or when they cant get to the cat flap.

This action mimics how the cat would bury its business in the wild, therefore preventing it from being tracked by predators, but it is also this movement that tends to lead to bits of litter being scattered across the floor. A litter box allows your cat to perform these actions while providing it somewhere private, safe, and convenient to do its business.

It means that your cat shouldnt have any accidents around the house, which can happen if they feel threatened when toileting outdoors. Some cats may go more or less often, while factors such as hydration levels, any treats theyve been given, and even their general health may mean that they use the litter on a different schedule. The basic plastic litter box is popular because it is simple to use, easy to fill, and most cats can learn to easily use them.

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And if a cat is spooked by their box, or inconvenienced by the size or complexity of it, theyre more likely to go looking for somewhere else less spooky and more comfortable to go. Everybody likes to have options, and for many reasons its a good idea to give them to your cat too when it comes to where they pee and poo.

Having too few litter boxes is a common cause for many of the toileting problems that result in cats being brought to the vet or relinquished to the shelter. Check out my litter box recommendation for young kittens and arthritic cats at the end of this article. If you do go the covered route, just make sure the opening isnt too small or difficult to get to, and be ready to switch to uncovered boxes should your cat ever develop asthma or arthritis .

Then add in the fact that many of these self-cleaning boxes require special (read: expensive) litters; not to mention that the daily scooping ritual with regular boxes provides an important opportunity to spot any changes in your cats pees and poos that could indicate a developing health concern (e.g., diabetes , kidney disease, constipation, or even urinary obstruction ). I love using the inner drawers of the the ones linked here , as they’ve got great dimensions for most cats: approximately 27″ long, 15″ wide, and 4.5″ tall and you can get them in multi-packs to save money! For very young kittens and cats with arthritis or other mobility problems: Here again, the best option isn’t always a traditional litter box.

When it comes to choosing a litter box, its important to match the size of the box to the size of your cat. Its easy to get influenced by a desire to choose a box based on whether it will fit in a certain location. In some cases that may still work out fine for your cat but in other cases, it means she ends up squeezing too much cat into too little litter box. Your cat shouldnt have to become a contortionist every time she has to go to the bathroom. The litter box size, shape and type should always be chosen based on what provides the most convenience, comfort and security for your cat. Too many times, we dont put the cats needs first when shopping for the litter box. We also tend to choose boxes that are too small because the litter box isnt something were thrilled to show off. As a result though, a box thats too small becomes a source of stress for the cat and thats a litter box problem just waiting to happen.

Do I Even Need a litter Box?

At its most basic, a litter box is a plastic rectangular box with raised sides. It is used to contain a substrate or litter material, for example, clay or wood chips, and is used by your cat to urinate and defecate. The cat will usually bury its business once complete, which means kicking litter to cover up solids and liquids.This action mimics how the cat would bury its business in the wild, therefore preventing it from being tracked by predators, but it is also this movement that tends to lead to bits of litter being scattered across the floor. A litter box allows your cat to perform these actions while providing it somewhere private, safe, and convenient to do its business. It means that your cat shouldn’t have any accidents around the house, which can happen if they feel threatened when toileting outdoors.

How Often Do Cats Use The Litter?

Cats go to the toilet up to five times a day, starting from around seven weeks of age. This includes urinating and defecating and is a rough guide. Some cats may go more or less often, while factors such as hydration levels, any treats they’ve been given, and even their general health may mean that they use the litter on a different schedule.