What Plants Deter Cats?

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In alphabetical order, here are 10 plants to start with when trying to cut down on damage to your yard from your local felines. If you are going to try to use citronella in your yard to repel cats, place them in areas where animals are able to brush up against them which will cause the scent to be released.

Make sure you dont give the citronella plants too much fertilizer because it will dilute the scent that you are trying to attract them with. Also known as Ruta Graveolens, the common rue has an offensive odor ad a bitter taste, so it is a double threat when coming to cats. The thing is, they do go crazy over wild catnip so the key to control is to plant it in an area where they will not be able to ruin anything.

Because
catnip is part of the mint family its scent alternately attracts cats and
drives them crazy. If you want to keep them away from using your planters as
their own personal litter box, just sprinkle some crushed up catnip leaves
where ever you want to keep them away. While it is basically easy to maintain, it needs full sun and needs to be kept out of the way of windy and rainy conditions.

The bright and cheery red flowers and the pure white pristine blooms always add a comforting look to a home. Lemongrass offers a full dramatic display of ornamental grass that will make your home look like it has been professionally landscaped. Keep it potted in a good quality type of soil and dont let the roots dry out.

The good thing is you will get to enjoy that fragrant lavender aroma knowing it will keep any problem cats in your neighborhood away.

What plants keep stray cats away?

Rue..Lavender..Pennyroyal..Coleus canina (Scaredy cat plant).Lemon thyme..Absinthe..Geranium.

How can I stop cats pooping in my garden?

One of the natural ways you can stop them from leaving deposits on your lawn is to scatter scents they don’t like. Cats are incredibly sensitive to smell so strong scents such as lavender, peppermint or cinnamon are great for keeping them away. Choose one of these scents, mix with water and spray around the garden.

Do lavender plants deter cats?

Lavender. We’ve put this at the top of the list because the smell that cats find so unpleasant is what makes the plant so appealing for humans, making this a very popular cat deterrent. Lavender grows all year round and will provide a nice purple hue to your flower beds.

What plants do cats not like to eat?

Amaryllis (Amaryllis spp.).Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale).Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron spp.).Castor Bean (Ricinus communis).Chrysanthemum, Daisy, Mum (Chrysanthemum spp.).Cyclamen (Cyclamen spp.).Daffodils, Narcissus (Narcissus spp.)

Whether they are feral cats, neighborhood cats, or your outdoor cats, the last thing you want is them digging up your precious garden. If you feel like you are losing the battle in keeping cats out of your garden, it is time to look into plants that repel cats.

Be sure to alter the locations slightly every few days, so the cats dont develop a new route to reach your garden. Some of the best cat deterrent mulches are citrus peels, which includes grapefruit, lime, lemon, and orange.

If you dont want forks sticking up all over the place, another option is to lay chicken wire across the soil to create an uncomfortable walking path for kitties. For getting rid of cats , cayenne pepper or crushed up pine cones sprinkled across the ground make an uncomfortable walking surface for sensitive paws. For humans, these garden plants emit a pleasant odor, but most cats find them unpleasant to their sense of smell.

Geraniums are mainly an outdoor plant but are also kept indoors during colder months, and with enough care, they continue to bloom all winter long. As the smallest member of the mint family, Pennyroyals arent just plants that deter cats; they also repel a variety of insects. When used in garden beds to deter cats, use it in the middle or front rows as it only reaches heights of up to three feet with a similar spread.

When planting Rosemary, keep in mind that it prefers a dry and relatively warm climate, and it does not do well in soggy soil or cold temperatures. For those living in areas colder than Zone 9 based on the US hardiness map, Rosemary works best when planted in a container as you can move it indoors when the weather changes. Containers alongside the patio or near flower beds can also help to repel cats, as it is the smell the plant emits that chases them off.

The Curry Plant is sold as a shrub and features small yellow flowers that do well in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. Citronella works in garden beds or containers placed throughout the patio and along walkways where they are brushed up against to release its scent. As an herb, Lemongrass offers a lot of benefits, one of them being the ability to repel cats and other pests with its lemony-citrus fruit scent.

As a tropical plant, Lemongrass requires well-draining soil with steady moisture to ensure the roots wont dry out.

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As much as we love cats, it doesnt mean we always want them rooting around. After all, a cat can very easily destroy a well-maintained garden by using it as a litter box. But that doesnt mean you need to resort to harmful or forceful methods to rid your garden of cats.

Image Credit: H. Zell, Wikimedia CommonsIf youre fond of using or eating the plants you grow, the Pennyroyal might be just right for you. And what makes for a pleasant tea and fresh smelling herb for you is a natural deterrent for wandering cats.

Image Credit: Hans, PixabayAnother wonderful herb that helps deter cats is rosemary . Used in a wide variety of dishes in the kitchen, a few sprigs of this woody perennial can liven up any meal. But if you have the opportunity to maintain fresh rosemary in your garden, the smell alone will help repel cats.

Image Credit: PxhereLemongrass is another useful kitchen herb if youre into Southeast Asian cuisine or teas. Its fresh, citrusy smell drives cats away while providing a very pleasant perfume around your garden. However, with this being a tropical plant, youll need to ensure that your lemongrass receives lots of water accompanied with well-draining soil.

Image Credit: Hans, PixabaySmaller variations are great for placing within the center of your garden and along walkways. The added height will prevent cats from simply bounding over your walls or border plants and entering anyway. Image Credit: Salicyna, Wikimedia CommonsThis evergreen shrub is quite pretty to look at, but its not the most appealing in terms of smell.

1 – Citronella

Citronella is part of the geranium family and while most of us enjoy its citrusy aroma, mosquitos, insects, and more importantly, cats, do not enjoy it.If you are going to try to use citronella in your yard to repel cats, place them in areas where animals are able to brush up against them which will cause the scent to be released.Check the price of citronella at Planting Tree.Make sure you don’t give the citronella plants too much fertilizer because it will dilute the scent that you are trying to attract them with.

2 – Coleus Canina

This plant is not only an effective one for repelling cats, but it is also known as the Scaredy Cat Plant (check pricing on amazon). Besides its name it comes with an additional bonus – it scares away dogs as well because of its offensive odor.The coleus Canina actually smells like strong urine. When the cats smell the pee smell, they steer clear of it and will go out of their way to avoid it.These plants are very easy to take care of so if you have an area where a cat is trying to use it as a litter area, jut plant some of the Scaredy Cat Plants and it will be all taken care of.

3 – Common Rue

Also known as Ruta Graveolens, the common rue has an offensive odor ad a bitter taste, so it is a double threat when coming to cats.This plant is part of the family of evergreen shrubs. It can be poisonous for children, so be careful where you plant it. It can thrive in sunny areas or in partial shade.Just make sure you give it plenty of room for drainage. The common rue plants do not reach heights past about three feet or so and they do not get very wide either.

4 – Catnip

Okay, you are probably wondering how this plant made the list of cat repellants when cats love it.The thing is, they do go crazy over wild catnip so the key to control is to plant it in an area where they will not be able to ruin anything. Give them enough space where they can roll around in it in a playful way.You can easily buy catnip seeds on amazon and plant them where you want it to grow.Because catnip is part of the mint family its scent alternately attracts cats and drives them crazy. If you want to keep them away from using your planters as their own personal litter box, just sprinkle some crushed up catnip leaves where ever you want to keep them away.

5 – Curry Plant

First of all, this plant is not a true curry plant, so don’t plan on adding it to any of your recipes.Secondly, make sure this is definitely a plant you want to use to deter the cats in your area because they are difficult to remove once they are planted. The good news is they not only repel cats but they can help keep deer under control.You will find the curry plant is your local nursery in the form of a shrub. It will have pretty yellow flowers that actually do smell like curry. While it is basically easy to maintain, it needs full sun and needs to be kept out of the way of windy and rainy conditions.Even though it may smell like curry, always remember, it is a bush and not an herb.

6 – Geraniums

Geraniums are a win/win plant. They will keep pesky cats away from your landscaped yard and garden, and they are one of the top 10 plants that realtors suggest their seller’s plant in order to sell their homes faster.The bright and cheery red flowers and the pure white pristine blooms always add a comforting look to a home.In addition to their attractive appearance, they have a scent that is pleasant to adults but not so fragrant to felines. If you take care of them, geraniums could bloom all winter long.Give them just enough water but not too much. Let them dry out in between watering. And make sure to keep pinching off dead leaves.Find magenta colored Tiny Monster Geraniums at Nature Hills Nursery.

7 – Lemongrass

Lemongrass offers a full dramatic display of ornamental grass that will make your home look like it has been professionally landscaped. Lemongrass can grow up to heights of more than five feet.Despite its impressive addition to your landscape it does have other benefits as it’s scent repels cats and other insects, and pests that are put off by the citrus scent of this plant.Lemongrass is best planted directly into the ground with enough drainage so that it is never sitting in standing water. Keep it potted in a good quality type of soil and don’t let the roots dry out.

8 – Lavender

Ahh, lavender. It has such a relaxing scent – for humans – for cats, not so much. The good thing is you will get to enjoy that fragrant lavender aroma knowing it will keep any problem cats in your neighborhood away. It is also a deterrent for deer and many kinds of insects.It is best to get the taller types of lavender and keep them planted around the borders so it will keep cats from getting into too much trouble.Creating a border with Phenomenal Lavender, for instance, will make a beautiful landscape and keep the neighborhood cats out of your garden at the same time. Find multi-packs of Phenomenal Lavender on amazon.

9 – Pennyroyal

Even though this plant is a definitely part of the mint family, it is also one of the smallest members. It can successfully repel cats and many different types of insects.The Pennyroyal plant is a good ground cover for your yard as it lays down roots wherever it lands. It can flourish in full sun or partial shade.

Geraniums (Pelargonium)

Geraniums are an excellent choice if you are looking for a natural cat repellent that also adds color to your landscape. For humans, these garden plants emit a pleasant odor, but most cats find them unpleasant to their sense of smell. Geraniums are mainly an outdoor plant but are also kept indoors during colder months, and with enough care, they continue to bloom all winter long.When caring for geraniums, it is important to water in small amounts and only when the leaves begin to droop. Cut off old, dead leaves as new growth appears.Before watering, allow the soil to dry and cut back watering in the winter, but not enough to allow the roots to dry. Pinch stems to promote a bush-like appearance and deadhead blooms to encourage new ones.

Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium)

As the smallest member of the mint family, Pennyroyals aren’t just plants that deter cats; they also repel a variety of insects. If you enjoy using the plants that you grow, this herb is an excellent choice as it is stronger and far more potent than other mint herbs in the family.In extract form, the herb is often used in teas. Do not confuse the American Pennyroyal with the European one. The low growing plant features hairy stem roots that grow up to about a foot tall.Great as ground cover flowers, Pennyroyal roots wherever it touches the ground. The new Pennyroyal plants work well as a border plant for a cat repellent. The plant enjoys full sun but can tolerate partial shade and does best in zones 5 through 9.

Lavender (Lavandula) – Cat Repellent Plants

While most of love the scent of lavender, it is not a favorite among cats for some reason, so they make an excellent choice as plants that keep cats away. Shrubby lavender plants are not just an excellent deterrent for cats; they are also one of the best plants that repel insects and deer. When used to keep cats out of your garden, it is best to plant them in a line.One issue you will face with lavender is the numerous options available. While all help keep cats out, the taller varieties are the most effective.Cats are jumpers, but if the bush blocks their line of sight as the taller lavender plants do, they are not as curious. Planting along borders also aids in chasing cats out, as these bushes release their pleasant scent whenever something brushes against them.

Common Rue (Ruta graveolens)

The musty odor emitted by the Common Rue keeps cats at bay, but the leaves also offer a bitter flavor, making it undesirable for cats to nibble. The shrub is poisonous if eaten so use caution when planting in garden beds around children.The evergreen shrub thrives in well-drained, dry to medium moist soils. The bush loves full sun but tolerates partial shade and poor soil as long as the soil offers excellent drainage.Rue grows well in zones four through 8, but requires winter mulch and does not tolerate wet soil. When used in garden beds to deter cats, use it in the middle or front rows as it only reaches heights of up to three feet with a similar spread.

Curry Plant (Helichrysum augustfolium)

In areas where this plant grows naturally, many view the plant as a nuisance, but these strong-smelling plants are useful cat repellent plants. The shrub requires full sunlight and reaches two feet tall by three feet wide. When planting in gardens, offer the Curry Plant protection from wetness and wind.Not only does this plant work at repelling cats, but it is also considered a deer deterrent. The Curry Plant is sold as a shrub and features small yellow flowers that do well in USDA hardiness zones 8 through 11. If you ever want to remove the plant, you should know it is often difficult to remove.Although the plant does smell like curry, it is not an herb and has no use in the kitchen. The plant does well in poor soils and dry conditions.

Lemongrass (Cymbopogon)

Lemongrass grows in tall, grassy clumps and reaches heights of up to five feet tall. The appearance of this tropical herb is similar to ornamental grasses; so many people use it as such in their garden beds. As an herb, Lemongrass offers a lot of benefits, one of them being the ability to repel cats and other pests with its lemony-citrus fruit scent.Never plant Lemongrass in clay soil; as it’s a tropical plant, it enjoys moisture but will quickly die if left in soil that allows water to puddle. When planting Lemongrass, select a location that offers full sun, even in hotter climates.As a tropical plant, Lemongrass requires well-draining soil with steady moisture to ensure the roots won’t dry out. When planting in a pot, find one that is at least 12 inches across and use a high-quality potting soil.

1. Scaredy Cat Plant—Coleus canina

When the plant’s name is Scaredy Cat Plant, you know there’s got to be a good reason. These plants—while extremely beautiful—emit a very strong ammonia-like smell that’s similar to urine.The smell may turn you off of them, but they’ll ensure that cats and dogs alike will avoid your garden and find somewhere else to do their business. But if you do opt to plant these, you won’t have to maintain them too much. These are low maintenance plants that do very well in dry areas.

2. Pennyroyal—Mentha pulegium

If you’re fond of using or eating the plants you grow, the Pennyroyal might be just right for you. Although it’s the smallest variety of mint, it packs the biggest scent and flavor punch out of all of them.And what makes for a pleasant tea and fresh smelling herb for you is a natural deterrent for wandering cats. They just can’t stand the scent of mint and will actively avoid the area it’s grown in. Use Pennyroyal as a boundary around the rest of your garden, and it should remain feline-free.

3. Rosemary—Rosmarinus officinalis

Another wonderful herb that helps deter cats is rosemary. Used in a wide variety of dishes in the kitchen, a few sprigs of this woody perennial can liven up any meal. However, not everyone can simply grow rosemary in their outdoor gardens.They prefer a neutral pH soil and require a dry, warm climate. That’s why most rosemary is grown best indoors. But if you have the opportunity to maintain fresh rosemary in your garden, the smell alone will help repel cats.

4. Lemongrass—Cymbopogon citratus

Lemongrass is another useful kitchen herb if you’re into Southeast Asian cuisine or teas. And it also helps to keep wandering cats from digging up your garden. Its fresh, citrusy smell drives cats away while providing a very pleasant perfume around your garden.However, with this being a tropical plant, you’ll need to ensure that your lemongrass receives lots of water accompanied with well-draining soil. Pot planting may be the best way to go for those living in areas with high clay concentrated soils as the clay will not allow for adequate drainage.

5. Citronella—Pelargonium graveolens citrosa

If you don’t have citronella in your garden, you may want to consider it. Aside from keeping cats away, this plant is also a natural deterrent for other pests such as mosquitoes. To get the plant’s full effect though, they need to be physically agitated. This can be done by putting them in garden walkways or other high traffic areas where they’ll be brushed up against.However, citronella isn’t the easiest plant to grow. They hate colder weather and will expire if hit with a frost. Also, you need to be sure not to over-fertilize them. Excess nitrogen will cause their scent to weaken, thus limiting their deterrent capabilities.

6. Curry Plant—Helichrysum angustifolium

Although the name of this plant is the Curry Plant, you won’t find these in any kitchen. They’re aptly named because they have a curry-like smell. While you may appreciate the spicy aroma, cats do not and avoid them at all costs.This plant is pretty robust and does well in dry, arid conditions. Aside from deterring cats, the plant also acts as a deer repellant.

7. Lavender—Lavandula varieties

There are few things more pleasing than the lingering scent of lavender in the air—unless you’re a cat that is. For some bizarre reason, cats just can’t stand the smell. Another unique attribute lavender has to detract cats from entering your garden is the varying heights in which it grows.Smaller variations are great for placing within the center of your garden and along walkways. The taller plants are best used as a border along the perimeter of your garden itself. The added height will prevent cats from simply bounding over your walls or border plants and entering anyway.

8. Common Rue—Ruta graveolens

This evergreen shrub is quite pretty to look at, but it’s not the most appealing in terms of smell. It has a musky, urine-like smell that’ll repel cats and other pests. It also has a very bitter flavor that will stop a cat in its tracks if they give it a nibble.This plant is also poisonous to humans if eaten as well, so be careful when planting this in gardens where small children may be present.

9. Geraniums—Pelargonium varieties

If there’s one thing you’ll want to plant in your garden, it’s geraniums. They’re bright, colorful, can bloom year-round, and have a light, pleasing odor. However, cats just don’t find them as attractive as we do. They can’t stand the smell and prefer to avoid the flowers altogether.

10. Catnip—Nepeta cataria

You might be curious as to why catnip made this list. It’s obvious that cats love catnip and go bonkers over the stuff. However, it can work as an extremely powerful deterrent if planted correctly.Instead of driving cats away, you could simply redirect them to a cat-friendly zone by planting catnip there. This will keep cats out of your garden while giving them a place all of their own.