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Dogs can eat some fruits, but other fruits are toxic to dogs, such as grapes and raisins. Due to the balanced nature of high-quality, nutritionally complete commercial diets, it’s not necessary to supplement your dog’s diet with fruits, but it can be fun to use them as treats.

Dogs are omnivorous, which means that they require a combination of animal and plant material to have a healthy, balanced diet. Dogs dealing with obesity, diabetes, bladder stones, and other conditions should not be fed fruit without consulting your veterinarian first. So, if there are no pre-existing conditions, can dogs eat blueberries or strawberries? Blueberries are low in calories and high in vitamin C, fiber, antioxidants, and phytochemicals (chemical compounds in plants that have been found to help fight cancer in humans). Blueberries have been shown to improve night vision, help prevent cell damage, and help with mental function in aging animals. Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and antioxidants. They should be cut into small pieces to avoid choking, and can be mashed or pureed for smaller dogs. Watermelon is 92% water, so it’s a great treat for hot days. Bananas are high in fiber, potassium, and vitamins B6 and C. However, they are also higher in sugar than many other fruits, so they should be given sparingly. Yes, dogs can eat raspberries, cranberries , and blackberries, in moderation. Berries are packed with antioxidants and phytochemicals while low in sugar and calories. Blackberries and raspberries do contain small amounts of naturally occurring xylitol. This is a sweetener that is used in a lot of low-sugar foods and is very toxic to dogs in large-enough amounts. These fruits are okay for your dog to eat, in moderation, as long as you remove any seeds, pits, or cores. These fruits fall into a gray area, and it might be best to avoid giving them to your dog. Avocado : Although the actual pulp is not toxic to dogs, the pit can cause intestinal blockage, and the high fat content can cause some dogs to have pancreatitis or stomach upset, even from just a small amount. Tomatoes : The ripe fruit is not toxic to dogs, but eating too much can cause stomach upset. Eating parts of a tomato plant itself can also cause dogs gastrointestinal (GI) upset. While fruit snacks are not considered toxic to dogs, they are very high in sugar, so they should be avoided. If you are giving your dog fruit in addition to other dog treats, make sure that you adjust the amount of treats given so that you do not exceed this 10% recommendation. All of the fruits listed as safe can be given fresh or frozen. Canned fruit in syrup should never be given due to the high sugar content. Pieces of fruit can be given as individual treats or added to your dog’s meals. Some dogs are more sensitive than others and may have flatulence (gas), vomiting, and/or diarrhea if given fruit. Even dogs with “stomachs of steel” can end up with GI upset like vomiting and diarrhea if given too much fruit due to its high fiber content. If you want to safely give your dog fruit as a snack, start out slow and watch for any signs of GI upset before making it a regular treat. If you do notice any of the signs of GI upset listed above, stop feeding your dog any fruit and call your veterinarian.

What type of fruit do dogs like?

Watermelon. Watermelon is a juicy fruit-filled food that contains 90% water. ….Blueberries. Blueberries are tasty berries that your dog will enjoy eating. ….Strawberries. Strawberries can be a sweet fruity treat for your dog. ….Carrots. ….Asparagus. ….Brussel Sprouts. ….Sweet Potatoes.

What is the best fruit dogs can eat?

Apples (remove seeds and core).Cucumbers..Oranges (can cause some gastrointestinal upset if too much is eaten).Mango (remove skin and pit).Peaches (avoid the pits).Pears..Pineapple.

Can dogs eat fruit daily?

Most fruits are generally safe for dogs in small quantities, and can be a good option as healthy treats! Fruits, such as blueberries are rich in antioxidants and beneficial for general health. Fruits can also provide additional dietary fiber, which aids digestive tract health.

What dogs Cannot eat?

Onions, garlic and chives. The onion family, whether dry, raw or cooked, is particularly toxic to dogs and can cause gastrointestinal irritation and red blood cell damage. ….Chocolate. ….Macadamia nuts. ….Corn on the cob. ….Avocado. ….Artificial sweetener (Xylitol) ….Alcohol. ….Cooked bones.

Summertime can mean visits to the pool or lake, family and friend barbeques, and a more relaxed atmosphere overall. The kids are generally out of school, so the early morning hustle and bustle to get out the door and the late night homework assignments don’t re-start until mid-August.

Many fruits and vegetables are low in calorie and provide vital vitamins that your body craves. They also contain amino acids, potassium, vitamin C and B6 and improve heart health and blood pressure. Raw, chopped or cooked, green beans have important vitamins and minerals and are full of fiber while being low in calorie. Once the pit and seeds have been removed, pears are rich in copper, fiber and vitamins C and K. Peas . Pineapple is a great sweet treat for dogs containing vitamins, minerals, fiber and bromelain (helpful in absorbing proteins).

If you’re like a lot of pet parents, you might have wondered at some point about what fruits can dogs eat. Maybe you accidentally dropped a piece of banana on the floor or were snacking on apple slices and felt tempted to give into pleading puppy eyes. Can dogs safety eat fruit? The happy answer is that yes, there are a handful of fruits that are perfectly fine to dish up to your dog in small amounts.

Preparation: “Remove the core, seeds, and stem, then feed one or two slices as a reasonable serving size,” say Dr. Erin Katribe, veterinarian and medical director for Best Friends Animal Society . If they have a sensitive intestinal tract, it may be gentler on their system to peel the apples before feeding.” Dog treat portion size: One or two slices is a serving. Benefits: No matter the variety of apple you choose, this crunchy sweet treat has zero fat and is high in fiber and vitamin A. Dog treat portion size: Two or three blueberries are a great treat.“Freezing them can make a great warm-weather treat, or you can give them a toss in the air for your pup to catch,” Dr. Katribe suggests. “In general, freezing any type of fruit in bite-size pieces can change the texture and keep things interesting and new for dogs.” Benefits: This vitamin-dense, high-antioxidant, low-calorie snack is rich in antioxidants and high in fiber, says Dr. Katribe. Specifically, they contain vitamins C, K, and manganese, and their antioxidant properties can potentially help bolster your dog’s immune system and brain function. High in lots of beneficial vitamins Do not serve rind (the outer skin) Chop into small pieces to avoid choking hazard Benefits: Fresh cantaloupe is a great way to give them an extra source of vitamins A, B, and C. Plus, this juicy, hydrating fruit is high in fiber, beta-carotene, potassium, magnesium, thiamine, niacin, pantothenic acid and folic acid (wow, what a powerhouse! We recommend stewing cranberries so they’re soft and mushy, straining, then adding to your dog’s food as a topper. To stew cranberries, put them in a saucepan with water, cover and cook until tender (about 30 minutes). Benefits: Tangy cranberries offer your pup a source of vitamin C, fiber, and manganese. High in several beneficial vitamins and loaded with fiber Do not serve whole as may present choking hazard Always remove peels and seeds Choose a ripe fruit (firm, brown and fuzzy) Preparation: Remove the skin and seeds and cut the fruit into small pieces before feeding to your dog. Benefits: Oranges provide dogs with fiber, potassium, calcium, folic acid, iron, flavonoids, phytonutrients, vitamins A, C, B1 and B6. Avoid canned or jarred pears (such as some baby foods) as these may contain added sugar or may be sweetened with xylitol which is toxic to dogs Preparation: Feed raw, or mash or puree some pear to put on top of your dog’s food. Avoid canned or jarred pears (such as some baby foods) as these may contain added sugar or may be sweetened with xylitol which is toxic to dogs. This nutrient-dense food is packed with naturally occurring probiotics that support healthy digestion and a strong immune system. Benefits: This fruit, available nearly year-round, is an excellent source of fiber, folic acid, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, copper, pectin and vitamins A, C, E, B1 and B2 Benefits: Pumpkin is a favorite fruit for dogs that tastes good, is easy on their tummy, and delivers lots of nutrients to their diet. This fall favorite is a source of fiber, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, zinc, iron, potassium, and Vitamin A. Pumpkin is also a popular supplement for dogs as it packs his diet with fiber that aids in digestion and promotes a healthy gut. Rich in nutrients and powerful antioxidants that can reduce the possibility of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis Fairly low in calories and high in fiber Raspberries contain a high level of natural xylitol , an all-natural sweetener that can be toxic to dogs in large quantities. Benefits: These berries are a compact source of dietary fiber, antioxidants, potassium, manganese, copper, iron, magnesium. Contain an enzyme that can help whiten your dog’s teeth Frozen berries are fine as long as they are not sugared. If you’re seeking a prepared product, try Fruitables Greek Strawberry Yogurt Flavor crunchy dog treats . It’s rich in fiber (to aid in digestion), potassium, magnesium, iodine, folic acid, and omega-3 fats (for skin and coat health). Dog treat portion size: “As with any new or different food, feed in small amounts to avoid any potential stomach or intestinal upset,” says Dr. Katribe. Benefits: A classic summer staple, watermelon is a refreshing low-calorie treat that tastes good and helps keep your dog hydrated. It also contains a large amount of vitamins A, B1,B5, B6 and C. Additional, watermelon boasts potassium, magnesium and antioxidant carotenoids, including beta-carotene and lycopene. Now that you know what fruits dogs can eat, read these tips to ensure optimum safety while feeding: Some fruits can be cut into bite-sized pieces (like apples or pears) while others are better mashed or pureed (like cranberries or pumpkins). As a rule of thumb, fresh fruit or vegetables shouldn’t account for more than 10% of your dog’s total diet. “Noting that, anything new or different should be fed in moderation, as any dog can have a sensitivity to specific items or to new things.” A: No, you shouldn’t give your pet any sort of fruit seeds (with the exception of fresh berries) or pits. A: While lots of fresh produce is a yummy snack for your pup, there are some fruits dogs should avoid. Grapes (including raisins): Even small amounts of this fruit can be toxic to some dogs, resulting in lethargy, diarrhea, abdominal pain, kidney failure, or even death. Tomatoes: While the ripe red part is probably OK, any green portions contain a toxin called solanine that can cause some GI upset. As you can see, incorporating fresh fruits into your dog’s diet is a great way to add some excitement and novelty into their world. When wondering what fruits can you give your dog, stick to the ones we listed above, only feed them the fleshy parts, and aim for small quantities. For health-related questions, always consult your regular veterinarian when possible as they can make the best recommendations for your pet.

While fruits and veggies are healthy foods for humans, dogs’ digestive systems are a little different. Take a look at our list of veterinarian-approved fruits dogs can eat before you share this yummy snack with your dog.

Lots of varieties have plenty of hydrating water, digestive fiber, natural sugar, vitamins, and minerals. For us human beings who need to mix and match proteins, carbohydrates, fiber, and nutrients to make sure we’re healthy and strong, fruit is very often a slam-dunk choice that beats out other treats we might eat. So, Prantil’s short answer as a veterinary nutritionist might be that fruit treats are fabulous, but remember it’s just a small part of your dog’s balanced diet. It is true that too much digestive fiber in fruit might give dogs a stomach ache, and too much sugar might make them feel queasy (same as you). That includes fruit and anything else that isn’t part of that balanced, measured diet you feed from a can, a bag, or maybe home-cooked meals planned with someone like Prantil. Particular dogs’ individual health issues may require a veterinarian like Prantil to watch protein (cutting back for some medical conditions, adding for others), phosphorus and, yes, sugar. Dogs with diabetes mellitus , an inability to regulate blood sugar, might need to watch their sugary fruit intake. Apples , but in very small pieces to avoid choking and not with skin or seeds (which contain a tiny amount of cyanide) Bananas (peeled) Blueberries Cranberries , but not mixed with raisins (which are toxic) Mangoes (in small pieces minus the skin and pit) Oranges , but only the fruit minus the seeds, the peel, the stem, and any particularly thick pith (the white stuff) Pineapple , but just that fruity part you eat (no rind to avoid a choking hazard!) Avocado , which isn’t a scary ingredient to see in dog food or a commercial dog treat, but is high in fat and has a toxic chemical in its pit and skin Cherry, apricot, and peach pits , which contain a small amount of cyanide and can cause sickness or death if chewed up and digested Grapes and raisins , always highly toxic, even in small amounts Then relax and enjoy some one-on-one time out there with a few pieces of Mother Nature’s sugary reward, just you and your dog.

Can Dogs Eat Blueberries?

Yes, dogs can eat blueberries.Blueberries are low in calories and high in vitamin C, fiber, antioxidants, and phytochemicals (chemical compounds in plants that have been found to help fight cancer in humans). Blueberries have been shown to improve night vision, help prevent cell damage, and help with mental function in aging animals.

Can Dogs Eat Strawberries?

Yes, dogs can eat strawberries.Strawberries are a good source of vitamin C, potassium, fiber, and antioxidants. Strawberries can also help strengthen the immune system. They should be cut into small pieces to avoid choking, and can be mashed or pureed for smaller dogs.

Can Dogs Eat Watermelon?

Yes, dogs can eat watermelon, but the watermelon rinds and seeds (even the pale seeds in seedless watermelons) should be removed before giving the fruit to your dog, as they can cause choking or intestinal blockage.Watermelon is 92% water, so it’s a great treat for hot days. It can help keep your dog hydrated and is refreshing when frozen. Watermelon is also a good source of vitamins A, B6, and C, as well as potassium.

Are Bananas Poisonous for Dogs?

No, bananas are not poisonous for dogs. Although dogs can eat bananas, they should not be given banana peels, as these are difficult to digest and could cause intestinal blockage.Bananas are high in fiber, potassium, and vitamins B6 and C. However, they are also higher in sugar than many other fruits, so they should be given sparingly. They should be cut into small, bite-size pieces.

Can Dogs Eat Other Berries?

Yes, dogs can eat raspberries, cranberries, and blackberries, in moderation.Berries are packed with antioxidants and phytochemicals while low in sugar and calories.Blackberries and raspberries do contain small amounts of naturally occurring xylitol. This is a sweetener that is used in a lot of low-sugar foods and is very toxic to dogs in large-enough amounts. For this reason, blackberries, and especially raspberries, should only be given in small amounts.Never feed your dog wild berries, as they can be easily misidentified, and many are toxic to dogs.

Fruits That Can Be Unsafe for Dogs

These fruits are okay for your dog to eat, in moderation, as long as you remove any seeds, pits, or cores.

Can Dogs Eat Fruit Snacks?

Avoid giving your dog these fruits, which are toxic for dogs.

How to Add Fruit to Your Dog’s Diet

Here are some tips for adding a little dog-safe fruit to your dog’s diet.

How Much Fruit Can a Dog Have?

Treats should take up no more than 10% of your dog’s diet. This also applies to fruit. If you are giving your dog fruit in addition to other dog treats, make sure that you adjust the amount of treats given so that you do not exceed this 10% recommendation.

How to Safely Prepare Fruit for Your Dog

As with all produce, fruit should be washed thoroughly before being fed to your dog. All of the fruits listed as safe can be given fresh or frozen. Canned fruit in syrup should never be given due to the high sugar content.Pieces of fruit can be given as individual treats or added to your dog’s meals. As with any treat, fruit can cause a choking hazard for small dogs, so please monitor your dog while they are eating.

Watch for Gas, Vomiting, or Diarrhea

Some dogs are more sensitive than others and may have flatulence (gas), vomiting, and/or diarrhea if given fruit. Even dogs with “stomachs of steel” can end up with GI upset like vomiting and diarrhea if given too much fruit due to its high fiber content.If you want to safely give your dog fruit as a snack, start out slow and watch for any signs of GI upset before making it a regular treat.If you do notice any of the signs of GI upset listed above, stop feeding your dog any fruit and call your veterinarian.

Blueberries

Cranberries

Pears

Strawberries

What Fruit Can Dogs Eat? These Are the Best Choices to Share With Your Pup

While fruits and veggies are healthy foods for humans, dogs’ digestive systems are a little different. Take a look at our list of veterinarian-approved fruits dogs can eat before you share this yummy snack with your dog.Fresh or frozen fruit is great. Lots of varieties have plenty of hydrating water, digestive fiber, natural sugar, vitamins, and minerals. Awesome!For us human beings who need to mix and match proteins, carbohydrates, fiber, and nutrients to make sure we’re healthy and strong, fruit is very often a slam-dunk choice that beats out other treats we might eat.Does the same go for dogs? Generally speaking, yes. But … most dogs who live with us in houses and apartments, on farms and pastures, live a different life than we do, says Lori Prantil, MPS, DVM, who counsels pet owners on nutrition at VCA South Shore Weymouth. Veterinarians, food scientists, and other food producers have tried to figure out exactly what nutritional needs dogs have, and they feed them exactly those nutrients in a can or in a bag. Boom: Complete balanced meal done (theoretically).”We humans eat variety, and we think that’s really important,” Prantil says. “We scramble to fill in the gaps. More calcium. More vitamin C. We think it’s important to have variety, but then we wind up not getting all our nutrients every day.”If they’re healthy and eat recommended amounts of a commercial diet, dogs who eat a balanced diet get all of that nutrition every day.So, Prantil’s short answer as a veterinary nutritionist might be that fruit treats are fabulous, but remember it’s just a small part of your dog’s balanced diet.

Should Dogs Eat Fruit?

Don’t worry. Dogs can eat many fruits, fresh or frozen. Just make sure it’s a small portion they can’t choke on! It is true that too much digestive fiber in fruit might give dogs a stomach ache, and too much sugar might make them feel queasy (same as you). But fruit is great, because it is typically hydrating and lower in calories, pound for pound, than other treats.Keep in mind that veterinarians recommend that no more than 10 percent of your dog’s daily calories be treats. That includes fruit and anything else that isn’t part of that balanced, measured diet you feed from a can, a bag, or maybe home-cooked meals planned with someone like Prantil. If water-filled, fiber-rich fresh fruit makes its way into your dog’s 10 percent or less treat budget, all the better.Particular dogs’ individual health issues may require a veterinarian like Prantil to watch protein (cutting back for some medical conditions, adding for others), phosphorus and, yes, sugar. And fruit has a lot of sugar.Dogs with diabetes mellitus, an inability to regulate blood sugar, might need to watch their sugary fruit intake. But sugar is often not the issue, Prantil says. It’s usually too many calories, too much fat, or too much sodium from too many dog treats or human scraps.