What Kind of Dog Looks Like a Mop?

Have you ever seen a particularly shaggy dog at the park, perhaps a dog that looks like a mop, and wondered what breed of dog it could be? Then read on, because weve identified the dog breeds with the most moppish coats. If you think mop dogs are cute, wait until you see these puppies that look like teddy bears.

Hailing from the Italian Alps, these shaggy sweeties were bred in the proud tradition of dogs that look like a mop: to guard and herd sheep. At 55-70 pounds, Bergs do resemble their larger Hungarian moplike cousins, but unlike the round, rope-like cords of Koms, their flocks are flat.

As their name implies, these gorgeous mops love the water, and playing fetch in the creek is their idea of heaven. It has the bonus of making them blend in with the flock, meaning any marauding wolf will get a big surprise when that juicy sheep turns out to be an 80-100 pound, very unimpressed mop dog! Their long, silky coats mat easily, which means that with a bit of persuasion, they can join the adorable ranks of dogs that look like a mop.

Often groomed into woolly, curly puffballs (called pompons), these black, white, or apricot aristocrats are well-known for being low-allergen and elegant.

Do Komondors hair naturally dread?

A mere handful of dog breeds are graced with vivacious dreadlocks. Some come by it naturally—like the Komondor, puli, and Bergamesco. Others—the poodle, Spanish water dog, and Havanese—can only achieve this look with a little help from their human friends.

How much does a mop dog cost?

The average price for a Mop dog puppy is between $800 and $1,200 USD with litter sizes ranging from 3 to 10 puppies. Consistent and frequent socialization for these puppies is a must; this will help to avoid their natural fearfulness of strangers.

Are Komondors aggressive?

Most Komondors will treat the pets in their own family as members of their flock. But they have strong instincts to drive away animals who do not belong to their family. Many Komondors are dominant or aggressive toward dogs they don’t know. … This powerful breed is capable of seriously injuring or killing other animals.

Are Komondors good pets?

Bred as a chief protector of herds, the Komondor is wary of strangers and fiercely protective. In households today, the Komondor serves as a dutiful guard dog for its human “flock” as well as a devoted companion. … The Komondor is usually good with the children in the family and is adaptable to other pets.

With their distinct corded hairstyle, komondors are one of the most recognizable dog breeds on the planet. These large, highly intelligent dogsalso sometimes referred to as Hungarian komondors or komondor mop dogs because of their white cordswere developed in Hungary to protect sheep, cattle, and herdsmen.

“Komondors are a large, muscular breed that’s known for being light on their feet, despite their unique double-coat appearance,” says Annette Louviere, DVM, veterinarian for Wisdom Panel . The cords form when a komondor’s coarse outer coat begins to trap the dog‘s softer undercoat, similar to some dreadlock hairstyles worn by humans.

Originally developed to guard livestock in Hungary, the komondor temperament is independent and watchful when it comes to looking after their animal (and human!) But once a komondor adopts a new person or animal into his flockwhether that’s a family cat or a new human sibling he’s a devoted friend for life. Some people say that komondors never forget someone they perceive to be part of their family and will recognize them immediately, even if a lot of time has passed.

Those cords do more than give komondors a funky hairdothey help keep these pups warm in the cold and cool in the summer. Though they can handle a fair amount of alone time, these devoted dogs need regular attention, affection, playtime, and exercise with their humans to be happiest. “They are social dogs who enjoy spending time with their owners and often need projects to keep their minds busy,” Louviere says.

Komondors thrive on large properties with plenty of open space, such as farms and ranchesthey don’t make the best apartment dogs . They’re happiest when they can do what they were bred to do, which they consider to be “their job”that is, overseeing herds or flocks of animals including sheep, goats, alpacas, and cattle. To be happy and healthy, these athletic dogs need regular exercise including walks , running around in the yard, and playing with their four-legged brothers and sisters or human companions.

Because of their working history, komondors enjoy spending long periods of time outdoors and don’t mind a little inclement weather. This breed’s unique corded hairstyle requires some special care and attention, but the komondor’s grooming needs aren’t overly complicated or difficult. “The cords of a komondor’s coat grow naturally but require care to maintain its beauty,” Louviere says.

Though komondor haircuts aren’t frequenttheir cords are meant to grow long regular bathing will keep them from getting smelly and dirty. It’s important to fully rinse all of the dog shampoo out of their cords, which can require a little extra care and time. With proper upkeep, a komondor’s cords are clean, beautiful, and bright white; as he gets dirty again, his locks may start to appear off-white.

If you’re caring for a komondor puppy, Louviere says you may want to gently help organize their burgeoning cords so they grow into long, beautiful, mature tassels over time. These include encouraging your dog to eat more slowly with a special slow-feed bowl , lowering causes of stress and anxiety, and feeding them smaller meals more frequently throughout the day. “[Komondors] are social dogs who enjoy spending time with their owners and often need projects to keep their minds busy.”

For centuries, komondors protected herds of cattle and flocks of sheep in Hungary, where they are considered to be the chief or king of the herdsman’s dogs. The American Kennel Club recognized the komondor in 1937, but the dogs almost went extinct after World War II.

While some people prefer their dogs short-haired or would rather want them to have a fluffy coat, others like them with some crazy hairstyles that often include- dreadlocks! As if dreadlocks on a dog wasnt already funny enough, when these dreadlocks grow long our canine companions start resembling walking mops and that can really look hilarious at times.

When theres a lot of sun during bright winter days, long hair on their head protects them from sunburn and enables a better vision. Always relay any questions you have regarding your pets medical condition to your veterinarian, local animal hospital or other qualified veterinary provider.

A mere handful of dog breeds are graced with vivacious dreadlocks. Some come by it naturallylike the Komondor, puli, and Bergamesco. Othersthe poodle, Spanish water dog, and Havanesecan only achieve this look with a little help from their human friends. But whether its functional or aesthetic, this coif is certainly eye-catching. And before we go any further, we must stress that the proper terms for dog dreadlocks are cords, flocks, and mats.

A close cousin of the Komondor, the puli sports thinner cords that also form naturally when the outer and inner coat become intertwined. The Bergamesco was only officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2015, but its an ancient breed whose 2,000-year history stretches from the Middle East through Asia to the European Alps.

Komondor

When you think of dogs that look like a mop, this shaggy beauty is probably the first image in your head. The Komondor is an ancient Hungarian breed, bred to guard sheep against wolves and poachers. Their adorable moplike cords protect them from both the harsh Hungarian winter and the sharp teeth of predators. It has the bonus of making them blend in with the flock, meaning any marauding wolf will get a big surprise when that juicy sheep turns out to be an 80-100 pound, very unimpressed mop dog! Speaking of, here are 15 dogs that look like wolves. As guard dogs, Koms are very independent and protective of their families, but their guarding instincts mean they tend to be suspicious of strangers. Koms are a good choice for experienced dog-owning families with older children, as they need plenty of exercise. And those beautiful corded coats? They’re naturally occurring! The coat begins to clump at about 9 or 10 months. Splitting the clumps makes them grow out into the sweet moppish cords that make this dog so adorable.

Puli

The Puli is a breed closely related to the Komondor, which is clear from its appearance—it makes sense that dogs that look like a mop would be siblings! Unlike their larger, heavier relatives, however, Pulik (the plural form of Puli—the “k” is silent) were bred to be herding dogs. They’re known as the acrobats of the dog world, sometimes jumping up on the backs of the slower sheep in the flock! These moppish beauties’ coats range in color from black to silver to white, but they can be distinguished from their big brothers by the difference in size: Pulik are much smaller than Koms, weighing only 25-35 pounds. They are also incredibly intelligent and in need of lots of physical and mental stimulation. These easy dog tricks would be no problem for the clever Puli to master. Pulik aren’t just adorable mop dogs, they’re also very loyal. With their strong herding instinct, they’ll try to herd anything: falling leaves, birds, even your toddler might get a gentle diaper tug if they start to stray.

Bergamasco Sheepdog

Hailing from the Italian Alps, these shaggy sweeties were bred in the proud tradition of dogs that look like a mop: to guard and herd sheep. At 55-70 pounds, Bergs do resemble their larger Hungarian moplike cousins, but unlike the round, rope-like cords of Koms, their flocks are flat. Bergamasco coats are made up of three types of hair: dog, goat, and wool, which mat together. Because their coat is designed to regulate their temperature, they should never be shaved. Not all dogs can handle the heat, however: here are the warning signs your dog is suffering from heat stroke. Their shaggy coats also fall over their eyes, which is both adorable and protective, shielding the pup’s eyes from snowblindness. Don’t worry though—their extra-long eyelashes help keep their bangs out of their eyes! The Bergamasco is an extremely sociable dog, forming individual relationships with each member of the family. Fun fact: it’s also one of the rarest dog breeds!

Spanish Water Dog

Although related to Portuguese Water Dogs like the famous former First Dogs, Sunny and Bo (friends of the Obamas), Spanish Water Dogs (SWD) are a different pooch entirely. SWDs were bred as herding dogs, but more importantly, they are another adorable dog that looks like a mop! Their coats are curly and woolly and can be grown out into tight, moplike cords. Unlike other corded breeds, the SWD has a single coat, meaning it has fewer undercoat hairs. As their name implies, these gorgeous mops love the water, and playing fetch in the creek is their idea of heaven. Just be careful to completely dry those cords! Like other herding dogs, SWDs are very intelligent and active; at 30-50 pounds, they’re great hiking or snowshoeing companions. Here’s how much exercise your dog really needs.

Havanese

These sturdy little bundles of fun are native to Cuba. Their long, silky coats mat easily, which means that with a bit of persuasion, they can join the adorable ranks of dogs that look like a mop. With their cute button eyes and round noses, Havanese are utterly charming and charismatic. Havanese are small (7-13 pounds), adaptable, smart, and social, making them a great city dog. They enjoy performing tricks and like to get their exercise through playing with their person, or a brisk daily walk. Havanese need to be routinely groomed, including cleaning their ears. Maintaining a corded, moplike coat on a Havanese takes work: you’ll need to separate the mats regularly, and it takes longer to bathe and dry a corded coat. But the results are so delightful that we think it’s worth the effort!

Komondor

With their distinct corded hairstyle, komondors are one of the most recognizable dog breeds on the planet. These large, highly intelligent dogs—also sometimes referred to as Hungarian komondors or komondor mop dogs because of their white cords—were developed in Hungary to protect sheep, cattle, and herdsmen.These loyal, instinctual overseers are independent and still task themselves with looking after their home and family, but they’re also affectionate and loving to anyone in their inner circle. Though you may occasionally spot a komondor dog on a farm or a ranch, this dog breed is rare as a family pet. But they do remain popular in rural parts of Hungary.”Komondors are a large, muscular breed that’s known for being light on their feet, despite their unique double-coat appearance,” says Annette Louviere, DVM, veterinarian for Wisdom Panel. “They tend to be brave and affectionate, making them excellent guard dogs.”

Appearance

Komondors are unmistakable dogs, thanks to their unique coats. Instead of traditional fur, komondors are covered in long, white, tassel-like cords. These cords are made of hair and form naturally as komondor puppies begin to age—younger dogs have shorter cords, while older dogs have longer cords.The cords form when a komondor’s coarse outer coat begins to trap the dog‘s softer undercoat, similar to some dreadlock hairstyles worn by humans. These cords cover a komondor’s entire body, including his head and tail.Komondors only have one coat color: white. Other corded Hungarian dog breeds, such as the puli, come in other colors, but there’s no such thing as a black komondor dog.Underneath that dense, moplike coat, komondors have muscular bodies. The komondor’s size is impressive—they typically weigh between 80–100 pounds and stand 25–27 inches tall. Although their faces can look like a mess of cords, these dogs have large heads, almond-shaped eyes, and triangular ears that hang down on either side of their face.

Temperament

Originally developed to guard livestock in Hungary, the komondor temperament is independent and watchful when it comes to looking after their animal (and human!) flocks. But when they’re with their people, they’re extremely loving and affectionate.Because of their breeding history, komondors may take a while to warm up to strangers. If a new person arrives at your house for the first time, introduce them to your komondor slowly and calmly. But once a komondor adopts a new person or animal into his flock—whether that’s a family cat or a new human sibling—he’s a devoted friend for life. Some people say that komondors never forget someone they perceive to be part of their family and will recognize them immediately, even if a lot of time has passed.Komondors are independent thinkers and do best when they can make their own decisions during training, guided by plenty of positive reinforcement (think praise and treats as rewards). Early komondor puppy training classes and socialization can also help them grow up to be well-behaved dogs.And though you may be smitten with their moplike locks, these dogs are really the best fit for more experienced dog owners.”These highly intelligent, athletic, and fearless dogs are wonderful and showy dogs for experienced and committed dog owners, but they can be difficult for the novice dog owner,” says Jen Jones, a professional dog trainer and behavior specialist who runs Your Dog Advisor.Komondors tend to adapt their energy levels to whatever situation they’re in. Some enjoy swimming and running, but each dog is different. Though they can handle a fair amount of alone time, these devoted dogs need regular attention, affection, playtime, and exercise with their humans to be happiest.”They are social dogs who enjoy spending time with their owners and often need projects to keep their minds busy,” Louviere says. Interactive toys and food puzzles are helpful for keeping their minds engaged, too.

Living Needs

Komondors thrive on large properties with plenty of open space, such as farms and ranches—they don’t make the best apartment dogs. They’re happiest when they can do what they were bred to do, which they consider to be “their job”—that is, overseeing herds or flocks of animals including sheep, goats, alpacas, and cattle.”Working dogs are bred to have a job, frequently working out in fields for hours and hours,” says Nicole Ellis, CPDT-KA and pet lifestyle expert with Rover. “Those traits don’t go away just by bringing a dog into a home—they are genetic—and you must ensure you meet your dog‘s mental and physical daily needs or it can lead to issues and frustration.”They’re generally friendly to other dogs, particularly those they share a home with, but may not do as well in a dog park-like setting with lots of unfamiliar pups around. To be happy and healthy, these athletic dogs need regular exercise including walks, running around in the yard, and playing with their four-legged brothers and sisters or human companions.Komondors are good with children, especially kids in their family, though parents should always supervise interactions between dogs and kids and make a point of teaching their children how to be kind, gentle, and respectful of all dogs, including komondors. Komondors are also typically gentle with cats they live with.Because of their working history, komondors enjoy spending long periods of time outdoors and don’t mind a little inclement weather. They’re also just as happy to come inside, where they’re known for following their owners from room to room.

Care

This breed’s unique corded hairstyle requires some special care and attention, but the komondor’s grooming needs aren’t overly complicated or difficult.”The cords of a komondor’s coat grow naturally but require care to maintain its beauty,” Louviere says. “Mature cords cannot be brushed, but the occasional bath still provides benefits.”Though komondor haircuts aren’t frequent—their cords are meant to grow long—regular bathing will keep them from getting smelly and dirty. It’s important to fully rinse all of the dog shampoo out of their cords, which can require a little extra care and time.When drying a corded komondor after a bath, it’s best to squeeze the cords with a towel to remove excess water, rather than rub the towel up and down their bodies. To keep the komondor’s cords clean and fresh, it’s also important to set up a fan to help them dry off more quickly (many komondors love nothing more than laying on their backs in front of a fan!).With proper upkeep, a komondor’s cords are clean, beautiful, and bright white; as he gets dirty again, his locks may start to appear off-white. Though it’s uncommon to see a komondor shaved, some owners shear off their cords every spring and let them regrow through the fall and winter.If you’re caring for a komondor puppy, Louviere says you may want to gently help organize their burgeoning cords so they grow into long, beautiful, mature tassels over time.”Puppies initially have soft, curly coats that grow into a dense, woolly undercoat and tassel-like corded outer coat, giving them a distinct moplike appearance,” Louviere says. “As puppies mature, their coats will start to clump. And separating those clumps into quarter-sized sections helps ensure the cords will grow more evenly in appearance.”Komondors don’t shed the same way other dogs do, as the their hair doesn’t flow freely. Occasionally, a komondor may shed an entire cord, but this isn’t very common.These dogs also benefit from regular nail trims and nightly tooth brushing, plus dental exams and cleanings at the veterinarian’s office when necessary. It’s also a good idea to regularly clean the komondor’s ears and check their cords for burrs, weeds, twigs, or other debris.

Health

Though they’re hearty dogs with no major genetic health issues, responsible komondor breeders will still test for hip dysplasia and eye issues. They typically have lifespans of 10–12 years.Like other large dogs, komondors may suffer from a serious and life-threatening condition called bloat, or gastric dilatation-volvulus. Veterinarians still don’t know exactly what causes bloat, but owners can take some steps to lower their dog‘s risk. These include encouraging your dog to eat more slowly with a special slow-feed bowl, lowering causes of stress and anxiety, and feeding them smaller meals more frequently throughout the day. Talk to your veterinarian about how you can reduce your pup’s risk.

History

One of the most well-known Hungarian dog breeds, komondors have a long history dating back to at least the 16th century, if not earlier, according to the Komondor Club of America (KCA).This ancient breed is likely a descendent of the Russian ovcharka breed, transported to Hungary by the Magyar peoples. For centuries, komondors protected herds of cattle and flocks of sheep in Hungary, where they are considered to be the chief or king of the herdsman’s dogs.The American Kennel Club recognized the komondor in 1937, but the dogs almost went extinct after World War II. According to the KCA, only a few dozen were left before the breed was slowly rebuilt in Hungary and exported worldwide.

Komondor

Komondor is a dog bred to guard sheep and cattle. In Hungary, it has been used as a cattle guardian for centuries. It might come as a surprise to you, but these dogs are actually born with a soft, white coat. With time, their wiry, outer coat grows and traps the softer undercoat to form dreadlocks. But is there any specific purpose of these cords? Namely, the white coat enables Komondors to blend with their wintery surroundings, while the cords make them warm and protect them from predators too!

Puli

It seems that Hungary produces some of the most vivacious cords in the canine world! Puli, a close cousin of the Komondor, has thinner cords that are a result of the outer and inner coats intertwined. Just like their dreadlock siblings, Pulis are known to be great shepherd dogs that are great at herding cattle. In fact, they are often paired with Komondors to guard the herd for the entire 24 hours – Pulis would guard during the day, while Komondors would watch at night. Despite having cords, Pulis still need maintenance in order to prevent matting. These thin dreadlocks also protect Pulis from cold temperatures and eventual predator attacks.

Bergamesco

This graceful breed has been around for more than 2,000 years. Bergamesco are intelligent and friendly dogs that make amazing herding dogs. They were used for guarding sheep and cattle, and just like in Komondors and Pulis, their cords help them keep their body warmth and protect them against predators. When there’s a lot of sun during bright winter days, long hair on their head protects them from sunburn and enables a better vision.

Spanish Water Dog

Among rare mop-looking dog breeds are Spanish Water dogs. These handsome dogs come from the Iberian Peninsula, but actually they do not grow dreadlocks naturally. Their coat forms some kind of thick locks of hair that can form cords only when shaved and then shaped while they grow. These graceful curls are also there for a reason. Because Spanish Water dogs come from the region with a humid climate, their curls are a natural response hot temperatures and high humidity in air.

Havanese

The Havanese are one of the funniest, most outgoing and playful dogs out there! They have been used as companion dogs of Cuban aristocracy throughout the 19th, but also as circus performers. Even though they look gorgeous with cords, these dogs don’t grow dreadlocks naturally. If you want a Havanese to have some cords, then you have to dedicate yourself to growing them. It will require a lot of grooming and brushing that will prevent mats from forming. Don’t start this process if you’re not ready to commit to your pup’s cords, as this process can take as long as two years!

Komondor

This herd-watching phenom is (officially!) a national treasure in Hungary, where the breed earned its keep for centuries guarding sheep and cattle. The Komondor’s name means “dog of the Cumans,” referring to the tribe of people who brought the dogs to Hungary in the 12th and 13th centuries. The dogs’ white coat helps them blend in with their herds and the wintery landscape. During the puppy phase, the coat is soft and wavy. But as the dog matures, the outer coat grows coarse, trapping the softer undercoat to form cords, which protect from predators and provide warmth.

Puli

A close cousin of the Komondor, the puli sports thinner cords that also form naturally when the outer and inner coat become intertwined. The Puli is native to Hungary as well, and prized for their herding ability. (Many shepherds have paid a full year’s salary for their work dogs.) Pulis were often paired with Komondors to guard a herd—the Komondors kept watch at night while Pulis stood guard during the day. Their white, gray, or cream-colored cords provide warmth and protection, but their coats require maintenance to prevent painful matting.

Bergamesco

The Bergamesco was only officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2015, but it’s an ancient breed whose 2,000-year history stretches from the Middle East through Asia to the European Alps. Their independent, sociable, intelligent nature makes them perfect for herding. And just as they’re accustomed to protecting their flocks of sheep, their “flocks” of hair keep them warm in the extreme mountain winters and protect against predators. The long hair over their eyes functions as a protective visor to prevent sunburn on bright winter days surrounded by reflective snow.

Spanish Water Dog

This good-looking, rustic breed from the Iberian Peninsula isn’t naturally “corded,” but still sports substantial locks of hair. Spanish Water Dogs are vigilant watchers, and they aim to please. Hunters, herders, and fisherman have long relied on them as loyal sidekicks. Their curly locks are perfectly adapted to their native humid climate, but in order to get a corded look, an owner must shave down the coat, then let it grow out, and shape the cords along the way.

Poodle

This easily recognizable breed is known for its versatile coat and elegant comportment. Cords don’t come naturally to a poodle, but a meticulous and attentive owner can alter the coat and create thin cords like those worn by the stylish lady pictured here. The coat must first be clipped and never brushed. When cords form, they must be separated again and again. Shampooing is out of the question—you must soak the corded pet in warm water and then squeeze the cords dry. Like milking a cow—yowsa!