What Is the Largest Snake in the World?

The largest living snakes in the world, measured either by length or by weight, are various members of the Boidae and Pythonidae families. They include anacondas, pythons and boa constrictors, which are all non-venomous constrictors. The longest venomous snake, with a length up to 18.518.8 ft (5.65.7 m), is the king cobra,[1] and the heaviest venomous snake is likely to be the Gaboon viper (which also has the longest fangs and delivers the largest amount of venom) or possibly the Eastern diamondback rattlesnake all three of which reach maximum weights in the range of 620 kilograms (1344 lb).

In terms of length, in addition to those listed here, there are two other species that may possibly reach a length of 20 feet (6.1 m) or more the Oenpelli python ( Morelia oenpelliensis ) and the olive python ( Liasis olivaceus ) however, the information available about those species is rather limited. [6] In spite of what has been, for many years, a standing offer of a large financial reward (initially $1,000 offered by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt in the early 1900s, [7] later raised to $5,000, then $15,000 in 1978 and $50,000 in 1980) for a live, healthy snake over 30 ft (9.1 m) long by the New York Zoological Society (later renamed as the Wildlife Conservation Society), no attempt to claim the reward has ever been made.

Although it is generally accepted that the reticulated python is the world‘s longest snake, most length estimates longer than 6.35 m (20 ft 10 in) have been called into question. [6] It has been suggested that confident length records for the largest snakes must be established from a dead body soon after death, or alternatively from a heavily sedated snake, using a steel tape and in the presence of witnesses, and must be published (and preferably recorded on video). RankCommon nameScientific nameFamilyMassImageLengthRange map
1 Green anaconda Eunectes murinus Boidae May exceed 227 kg (500 lb), [9] validity questionable97.5 kg (215 lb), reliable, maximum among 780 specimens caught over a seven-year period 199298 [10] Average 30.8 kg (68 lb) among 45 specimens (199298) [10] Generally considered the heaviestMay exceed 8.8 m (29 ft), [9] not firmly verified [6] 5.6 m (18 ft), somewhat reliable [2] 5.21 m (17.1 ft), reliable, maximum among 780 specimens caught over a seven-year period 199298 [10] Average 3.7 m (12 ft) among 45 specimens (199298) [10] Minimum adult length 3.2 m (10 ft) [2] 2 Burmese python Python bivittatus Pythonidae 182.8 kg (403 lb), reliable, for “Baby” in 1998 [6] 5.74 m (18.8 ft), reliable, for “Baby” ca.

1999 [6] Minimum adult length 2.35 m (7.7 ft) [2] 3 Reticulated python Malayopython reticulatus Pythonidae Up to 158 kg (350 lb), somewhat reliable [11][12] 158.8 kg (350 lb), somewhat reliable, for “Medusa” in 2011 [13] Almost 160 kg (350 lb), somewhat reliable, for “Twinkie” in 2014 [14] 136 kg (300 lb), somewhat reliable, for “Fluffy” in 2010 [15] 133.7 kg (295 lb), reasonably reliable, for “Colossus” in 1954 (with an empty stomach) [6][16] 124.7 kg (275 lb), somewhat reliable, for “Samantha” in 2002 [16][17] 115 kg (254 lb), somewhat reliable, for “Super Snakein 2021 [18][19][20] 59 kg (130 lb), reliable, wild specimen in 1999 (after not eating for nearly 3 months) [8] 10 m (33 ft), [11][12] not firmly verified [6] 7.92 m (26 ft), somewhat reliable, for “Samantha” in 2002 [16][17] 7.67 m (25.2 ft), somewhat reliable, for “Medusa” in 2011 [13] 7.3 m (24 ft), somewhat reliable, for “Fluffy” in 2010 [13][15] 7 m (23 ft), somewhat reliable, for “Super Snakein 2021 [18][19][20] 6.95 m (22.8 ft), reliable, wild specimen in 1999 [8] 6.35 m (20.8 ft), reasonably reliable, for “Colossus” in 1963 (skeletal length) [6] Minimum adult length 3.04 m (10.0 ft) [2] Generally considered the world‘s longest
4 African rock python Python sebae (sometimes considered two species, P. sebae and P. natalensis ) Pythonidae Up to 113 kg (250 lb), [21] not firmly verified [6] Up to 7.5 m (25 ft), [22] not firmly verified [6] Minimum adult length 2.50 m (8.2 ft) [2] 5 Indian python Python molurus Pythonidae 91 kg (200 lb), [23] not firmly verified [6] 52 kg (115 lb), reliable [24] 6.4 m (21 ft), [23] not firmly verified [6] 4.6 m (15.1 ft), reliable [24] 6 Amethystine (scrub) python Simalia amethistina Pythonidae 91 kg (200 lb) [ citation needed ] Little information about size is available [2] Some reports up to [26] or exceeding 8 m (26 ft), [2] not firmly verified [6] 7.2 m (24 ft), somewhat reliable [27] In excess of 6 m (20 ft) [26] Typically 3.5 m (11 ft) [2] Minimum adult length 1.8 m (5.9 ft) [2] Little information about size is available [2] 7 Yellow anaconda Eunectes notaeus Boidae They commonly weigh 25 to 35 kg (55 to 77 lb), though large specimens can weigh 40 to 55 kg (88 to 121 lb) or even more. Burmese pythons: “Baby” a captive Burmese python ( Python bivittatus ) female 5.74 meters (18 ft 10 in), 182.8 kilograms (403 lb); “Baby” was kept at Serpent Safari in Gurnee, Illinois , until its death at almost 27 years old, euthanized due to deteriorating condition caused by tumor in 2006. Intact specimen measured post mortem by University of Florida .

[42] [43] [44] Wild-caught non-native (invasive) Burmese python ( Python bivittatus ) female 5.56 meters (18 ft 3 in), 60.3 kilograms (133 lb); caught by University of Florida wildlife biologist in Miami-Dade County, Florida, July 9, 2015. Intact specimen measured post mortem by University of Florida. Reticulated pythons: “Medusa” a captive reticulated python ( Malayopython reticulatus ) female 7.67 meters (25 ft 2 in) 158.8 kilograms (350 lb); “Medusa” is kept at the Edge of Hell haunted house attraction in Kansas City, Missouri , and was last officially measured in 2011.

[13] [48] “Samantha” a captive (originally wild-caught near Samarinda, Borneo , as an already very large adult) reticulated python ( Malayopython reticulatus ) female 7.92 meters (26 ft), somewhat reliable in 2002 [16] [17] Wild-caught reticulated python ( Malayopython reticulatus ) Female 7.5 meters (24 ft 7 in) adjusted post-mortem measurement, unreliable, originally measured alive at 8 meters (26 ft 3 in) unreliably, using an unknown method, 250 kilograms (550 lb) estimated weight upon capture, unreliable; caught April 7, 2016, Paya Terubong district, Penang Island, Malaysia . [49] [50] [51] “Fluffy” a captive reticulated python ( Malayopython reticulatus ) female 7.3 meters (23 ft 11 in) 136 kilograms (300 lb); “Fluffy” was last officially measured live on September 30, 2009, and died at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Powell, Ohio , on October 26, 2010, due to an apparent tumor. [15] [13] “Colossus”, a captive reticulated python ( Maylayopython reticulatus ) male, skeletal measurement 6.35 meters (20 ft 10 in) 133.7 kilograms (295 lb); “Colossus” was kept at the Highland Park Zoo in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania , died in April 1963, and the body was deposited at the Carnegie Museum .

[6] “Super Snake“, a captive reticulated python ( Malayopython reticulatus ) 14-year-old female 7 meters (23 ft), 115 kilograms (254 lb); “Super Snakeis kept at the National Aquarium in Al Qana, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates . Tales of Giant Snakes: A Historical Natural History of Anacondas and Pythons . ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Barker, David G.; Barten, Stephen L.; Ehrsam, Jonas P.; Daddono, Louis (2012).

“Predation on Sun Bears by Reticulated Python in East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo” . The life history of the green anaconda ( Eunectes murinus ), with emphasis on its reproductive Biology (PDF) ( Ph.D. thesis). ^ “Twinkie The World‘s Largest Albino Reticulated Python Dies” .

Fluffy: Guinness record-holding reticulated python, 24 feet long, dies at Columbus Zoo” . “Abu Dhabi is now home to Super Snake, one of the largest reptiles in the world” . “World‘s largest snake from Los Angeles is now in Abu Dhabi” .

(1966), “A contribution to the herpetology of West Pakistan” , Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History , 134 (2): 117118, hdl : 2246/1129 . ^ Murphy, John C. “Amethystine Python, Simalia amethistina (Schneider)” . ^ a b Obst, Fritz Jrgen; Richter, Klaus; Jacob, Udo (1988).

The Completely Illustrated Atlas of Reptiles and Amphibians for the Terrarium (originally published in German in 1984 as Lexicon der Terraristik und Herpetologie by Edition Leipzig) . “Genetic population structure of the yellow anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina: management implications”. ^ Murphy, John C. “Yellow Anaconda, Eunectes notaeus (Cope)” .

^ Boa Constrictor Fact Sheet Woodland Park Zoo Seattle WA . ^ Murphy, John C. “De Schauensee’s Anaconda, Eunectes deschauenseei (Dunn and Conant)” . ^ a b Murphy, John C. “Papuan Olive Python, Simalia papuana (Peters and Doria, 1878)” .

“Enormous Burmese python caught in Florida is largest ever found in state” . ^ “Hunters capture longest Burmese python ever caught in Florida” .

Which is bigger python or anaconda?

Anaconda is the heaviest and the biggest snake in the world. On the other hand, the python is no doubt the longest snake in the world. An anaconda can weigh as much as 550 pounds or more and can grow up to 25 feet. … However, a 20-foot anaconda will outweigh a much longer python.

Can anaconda eat a human?

Adults are able to consume much larger animals, including deer, capybara, caimans and large birds. Females will sometimes cannibalize males, especially during breeding season. Due to their size, green anacondas are one of the few snakes capable of consuming a human, however this is extremely rare.

Who is bigger Titanoboa or anaconda?

Using the length-weight ratios of a rock python and an anaconda as a guide, Head estimated that Titanoboa weighed in at over 1.3 tons. That’s almost thirty times as heavy as the anaconda, the bulkiest species alive today.

Like crocodiles, snakes also suffer from a prevalence of big fish stories and over-exaggeration in the internet era. In fact, it is very difficult to measure how large actually a snake is, especially if its really big. So, how big are the longest snakes actually? Heres the list of the largest snakes in the world.

According to the Guinness World Records Book , at 7.67 meters (25 feet 2 inches) long, Medusa , a Reticulated Python owned by Full Moon Productions in Kansas City, Missouri, USA is the longest snake ever in captivity. The 8-year-old (as of 2015), 158.8 kilograms (350-pound) reptile is primarily kept coiled up in a nook in a haunted house attraction (The Edge of Hell) with its cavernous turn-of-the-century brick warehouse.

Medusas primary diet consists of a combination of rabbits, hogs, and deer, served to her every two weeks. Members of Malaysias Civil Defence Department hold a python believed to be 8 meters (26 feet and 2.96 inches) long and found on Penang island. According to the Malaysia Civil Defence Department authorities, it was 8 meters (26 feet and 2.96 inches) in length and about 250 kg (551.15 lb) in weight.

Fluffy, the reticulated python: the previous Guinness world record holder of the Largest Snake in Captivity with 24 feet (7.3 m). The specific name, reticulatus, is Latin meaning net-like, or reticulated, and is a reference to the complex color pattern. Reports of anacondas 35-40 feet (10.6-12.1 meters) or even longer also exist, but such claims need to be regarded with caution, as no specimens of such lengths have ever been deposited in a museum and hard evidence is lacking.

The longest (and heaviest) verified specimen encountered by Dr. Jess Antonio Rivas, who had examined thousands of anacondas, was a female measuring 5.21 meters (17.09 ft) long and weighing 97.5 kg (215 lb). King Kobra (scientific name: Ophiophagus hannah) is the longest venomous snake in the world. Gigantophis lived approximately 40 million years ago in the northern Sahara , where Egypt and Algeria are now located.

By comparing the sizes and shapes of its fossilized vertebrae to those of extant snakes, researchers estimated that the largest individuals of Titanoboa cerrejonensis found had a total length of around 12.8 m (42 ft) and weighed about 1,135 kg (2,500 lb; 1.1 long tons), which supplanted the previous record holder, Gigantophis. By examining these joints, ridges, and knobs, and describing individual vertebrae as a set of coordinate points on a graph, Head and Polly created a template for all snakes. For example, a 2009 study in the journal Nature applying the mathematical model used in the above study to an ancient lizard fossil from temperate Australia predicts that lizards currently living in tropical areas should be capable of reaching 33 feet, which is obviously not the case.

Reports without physical proof are almost always dubious (in fact, simply false) from non-scientists: such individuals may at worst be more interested in promoting themselves or telling a good tale, or at the least may not be sufficiently trained in proper measurement methods. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, this species has been perhaps subject to the most extreme size exaggerations of any living animal. Several zoologists (notably Henry Walter Bates and Alfred Russel Wallace, among others) note rumors of snakes beyond 30 or 40 feet (9-12 meters) long, but in each case, their direct observations were limited to snakes of approximately 20 feet (6.1 meters) in length.

To prove the point of overestimating, in Guyana in 1937, zoologist Alpheus Hyatt Verrill asked the expedition team he was with to estimate the length of a large, curled-up anaconda on a rock. According to some websites, a giant 10-meter (33 feet) long anaconda was found at a construction site in Altamira, Par in northern Brazil.

What is the biggest snake in the world? With more than 3,000 species of snakes living around the globe, there are a lot of candidates to consider. The largest snakes listed here were chosen because of their extraordinary length. The snakes with tremendous length combined with a large weight ranked even higher on the list.

The king cobra is not only one of the largest in the world, but it also claims the title of the longest venomous snake on earth! These snakes can make themselves look even bigger when they stand up or lift the top half of their body off the ground, in response to a threat.

Black Mambas are also among the fastest snakes in the world, slithering at speeds of up to 12.5 miles per hour. The slender black mamba only weighs about 3 pounds making it easy to move its long body at a speed of 12.5 miles per hour. The Green Anaconda give birth to live young, that are about two feet long when they are born.

The snake that claims the title of biggest in the world lives in the Amazon rainforests and swamps of Brazil .

List of largest snakes

The largest living snakes in the world, measured either by length or by weight, are various members of the Boidae and Pythonidae families. They include anacondas, pythons and boa constrictors, which are all non-venomous constrictors. The longestThere are eleven living snakes, listed below according to their maximum known or reported mass, that have a maximum mass that may reach or exceed 50 pounds (23 kg). Pending the acceptance of its taxonomic status, the Bolivian anaconda (In terms of length, in addition to those listed here, there are two other species that may possibly reach a length of 20 feet (6.1 m) or more – the Oenpelli python (It is important to be aware that there is considerable variation in the maximum reported size of these species, and most measurements are not truly verifiable, so the sizes listed should not be considered definitive. In general, the reported lengths are likely to be somewhat overestimated.Although it is generally accepted that the reticulated python is the world‘s longest snake, most length estimates longer than 6.35 m (20 ft 10 in) have been called into question.

See also[edit]

Individual specimens considered among largest measured for their respective species include the following:

Medusa – the largest snake in captivity

According to theThe 8-year-old (as of 2015), 158.8 kilograms (350-pound) reptile is primarily kept coiled up in a nook in a haunted house attraction (The Edge of Hell) with its cavernous turn-of-the-century brick warehouse. Medusa’s primary diet consists of a combination of rabbits, hogs, and deer, served to her every two weeks.

Gigantophis

The snake was named after Egyptian Under Secretary of State for Public Works, William Garstin. The species is known to scientists only from a small number of fossils, mostly vertebrae.

Titanoboa: the largest snake ever lived

Titanoboa, meaning “titanic boa”, is an extinct genus of snake that lived approximately 60-58 million years ago, during the Paleocene epoch, a 10-million-year period immediately following the dinosaur extinction event. The only known species is Titanoboa cerrejonensis, the largest, longest, and heaviest snake ever discovered.By comparing the sizes and shapes of its fossilized vertebrae to those of extant snakes, researchers estimated that the largest individuals of Titanoboa cerrejonensis found had a total length of around 12.8 m (42 ft) and weighed about 1,135 kg (2,500 lb; 1.1 long tons), which supplanted the previous record holder, Gigantophis.Jason Head, then working at the University of Toronto and Indiana University paleontologist P. David Polly for two years had been building a mathematical model of a snake spinal column based on living species.By examining these joints, ridges, and knobs, and describing individual vertebrae as a set of coordinate points on a graph, Head and Polly created a template for all snakes.Over the course of evolutionAfter developing coordinates for individual Titanoboa vertebrae, Head and Polly used the model to position them in their correct spinal location and determine Titanoboa’s length.The team published its first results in Nature in early 2009, saying Titanoboa was between 42 feet and 49 feet (12.8-14.9 meters) long, with a mean weight of 2,500 pounds (1,134 kg). The Cerrejón vertebrae were all of comparable size even though they were from different animals. With Titanoboa, enormous was the rule, not the exception.Several researchers disagreed with the above estimate. For example, a 2009 study in the journal Nature applying the mathematical model used in the above study to an ancient lizard fossil from temperate Australia predicts that lizards currently living in tropical areas should be capable of reaching 33 feet, which is obviously not the case.In another critique published in the same journal, Mark Denny, a specialist in biomechanics, noted that the snake was so large and was producing so much metabolic heat that the ambient temperature must have been four to six degrees cooler than the current estimate, or the snake would have overheated.

meter (33-feet) Brazil Anaconda

According to some websites,The hoax was started by some tabloid papers’ websites like dailymail.co.uk, thesun.co.uk, mirror.co.uk, dailystar.co.uk, etc. They posted the video above and filled the internet with anaconda 10 meters and 400 kg.You can read the whole story of the hoax on the ellinihoaxes.gr website(you may want to translate the page into English). According to the site, the hoax was originally produced by e-farsas.com, which managed to fool the whole world.The company that manufactures the dam also noticed that the video is not taken in the place where