What Is the Difference Between Cat6 and Cat7?

It is generally acknowledged that build a new house is not a simple task, especially for setting up a new network in the new house. Cat5 network cable seems lags behind a lot in the long run of network cables. For future proofing network cables, both Cat6 and Cat7 Ethernet cables are good choice. Allodoxaphobia would occur under this occasion for most Ethernet users about the optimal one. This article would put emphasis on comparing the difference between Cat6 and Cat7 network cable, and guiding you to choose a better one for a new house in the following four aspects.

With current SSD drives pushing past 500Mbytes which is around a 50% improvement in about a year and a half, 4k tvs needing around 10gbs because you never get max bandwidth, going to be throwing spam about your house.

What is Cat7 cable used for?

Category 7 cable known as a Cat7 or Cat-7 cable is used to cable the infrastructure of Gigabit Ethernet. It offers up to 600MHz. A perfect choice to cable your smart home. After cabling, you can even check for the automation ideas.

Are Cat6 and Cat7 connectors the same?

Do Cat6 and Cat7 cables use different connectors? Cat6 and Cat7 cables will use the same types of connectors. … For Cat7 cable which only comes in shielded versions to handle the higher frequencies it needs a whole shielded channel.

Are Cat7 cables worth it?

Cat7 cabling is definitely worth the money, but that’s not to say it’s cheap by any means. Cat7 cable can cost a lot, far more than Cat6a, so you need to have the kind of budget to allow for that investment. … Yes, Cat6a and Cat7 are both backward compatible cabling, meaning each one is interchangeable.

Is Cat7 good for Internet?

Cat7 and beyond. The speeds are wickedly fast, at shorter distances, maxing out at 100 Gbps at less than 15 meter distances, and reverting to 10 Gbps at longer distances. … These “next generation” cable choices of Cat7 and above are more suited to data centers, than residential applications.

Our homes and businesses are filled with electronic devides that need an internet connection to work. It used to just be out computers, but now its smart TVs, printers, media players, games consoles etc. So it becomes even more importantto have everything connected properly.

Even if you dont think you need the faster cables right now, it might be worth investing in them anyway, should you get newer devices later on that would benefit from the higher bandwidth and transfer speeds. If youre unsure which would benefit your business set up, then get in touch with our Wi-Fi experts here at Geekabit and we can help advise what would work best for you.

Ethernet represents the plumbing pipes of the Internet. Many network installers and system integrators are familiar with the ethernet types: Cat5e and Cat6 cables with RJ45 connectors. But the term Ethernet, co-invented by Robert Metcalfe, encompasses an entire range of twisted pair and fiber cables that are constantly being upgraded and standardized by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers known as IEEE. Each new iteration of Ethernet, or category, supports increasingly faster bandwidth speeds and improves upon noise cancelation.

This guide will help you learn more about the subtle differences between each generation of twisted pair Ethernet cable. However, each new generation introduces copper pairs with tighter twists and more complex sheathing.

With the ability to support a maximum frequency of 16 MHz, this type of Ethernet can still be used for two-line telephone systems and 10BASE-T networks. Though Cat5 and Cat5e cables are physically similar, Category 5e Ethernet adheres to more stringent IEEE standards. Cat5e is the most common type of cabling used for deployments due to its ability to support Gigabit speeds at a cost-effective price.

Even though Cat6 and Cat6a cabling offer higher performance rates, many LANs still opt for CAT5e due to its cost-effectiveness and ability to support Gigabit speeds. Cat6a also features more robust sheathing which eliminates alien crosstalk (AXT) and improves upon the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Cat7 offers extensive shielding to reduce signal attenuation and is relatively stiff in comparison to previous generations of cabling.

The shielding needs to be grounded and Cat7 also requires special GigaGate45 (GG45) connectors to take full advantage of higher performance features. Most of our AV and IP surveillance customers opt for Cat6a STP or Cat6a FTP. Both offer shielding from alien crosstalk and interference around high voltage lines.

Each cable category has various types of insulation or shielding that installers need to take into consideration before purchasing. Twisting the copper cable every 3-4 utility poles allowed for the reduction of electromagnetic interference and an increase in range. Unshielded Twisted Pair, or UTP, includes no shielding and is ideal for most common LAN environments.

Shielded twisted copper pairs, are reserved for networking environments with higher frequencies. The first letter signifies the type of shield used to enclose all four twisted pairs of an Ethernet cable. Common in Fast Ethernet deployments, this cable will have a foil shield that wraps around unshielded twisted pairs.

This cable braids a shield around a foil wrap to enclose unshielded twisted pairs.

A Category 7 cable (CAT 7) is used for the cabling infrastructure of Gigabit Ethernet with performance of up to 600MHz. Put simply, a CAT 7 cable is what we recommend you use when wiring your smart home.

That works out at a $74 difference between the average CAT 6 price and the CAT 7 not as bad as perhaps as it first appears, especially when you consider the costs involved in the grand scheme of building a house. Life can be unpredictable to say the least, so it makes sense to plan your new home with the future in mind.

Thanks to Loxone Tree , you can reduce the number of cables that need to be run within the home.

Build a Co-Axial Based Network

Cross sections of different category types of Ethernet reveal differing internal physical compositions.

Different Ethernet Categories

Ethernet cabling differences can be invisible to the casual observer. However, each new generation introduces copper pairs with tighter twists and more complex sheathing.

Category 5e

Though Cat5 and Cat5e cables are physically similar,Cat5e is the most common type of cabling used for deployments due to its ability to support Gigabit speeds at a cost-effective price.Further, Cat 5e supports speeds of up to 1000 Mbps. It’s flexible enough for small space installations like residences, though it is still used in commercial spaces. Of all the current cabling options, Cat5e is your least expensive option.NOTE: 100-250Mhz/1 Gbps/100m.

Category 6a

Cat6 cables also sport thicker sheaths in comparison to Cat5e. Though standard Ethernet supports distances of up to 100 meters, CAT6 cable only supports 37-55 meters (depending on crosstalk) when transmitting 10 Gbps speeds. Its thicker sheath protects against Near End Crosstalk (NEXT) and Alien Crosstalk (AXT).
NOTE: 250-500Mhz/10 Gbps /100m.

Category 7

Cat7 can also support 10 Gbps, but laboratory testing has successfully shown its ability to transmit up to 40 Gb at 50 meters and even 100 Gb at 15 meters.Cat7 offers extensive shielding to reduce signal attenuation and is relatively stiff in comparison to previous generations of cabling. Both individual pairs are shielded, with an additional layer of shielding over the entire cable. The shielding needs to be grounded and Cat7 also requires special GigaGate45 (GG45) connectors to take full advantage of higher performance features.All in all, Cat6a can perform just about the same as Cat7 but at a lower price point. Most of our AV and IP surveillance customers opt for Cat6a STP or Cat6a FTP. Both offer shielding from alien crosstalk and interference around high voltage lines.Cat7 is suited for use in datacenters and large enterprise networks.Note: 600Mhz/10Gbps/100m (40Gbps at 50m/100Gbps at 15m).

Why are copper pairs twisted?

Answer the following questions to narrow down to your requirements:Here’s a link to an outdoor CAT6 gel filled cable. There are plenty of good manufacturers out there. PLANET is not advocating one supplier. This is just to illustrate.Each cable category has various types of insulation or shielding that installers need to take into consideration before purchasing. There’s no one answer to all questions but the answers to these questions should help the reader decide based on their project.The price difference between the various types can range anywhere from $100 to $600+ depending on type.Here’s a helpful overview: Siemon’s category 6A F/UTP shielded outside plant (OSP) cable delivers TIA and ISO performance requirements for shielded category 6A/class EA.

Shielded (FTP) vs. Unshielded (UTP)

Twisted pair copper comes in shielded an unshielded forms. Shielded copper cable includes protective conductive coating such as braided strands of copper, copper tape or conductive polymer to reduce noise interference.There are many types of shielded copper pairs.

Shielding Code:

TP: Twisted PairU: Unshielded or UnscreenedF: Foil ShieldingS: Braided Shielding

Types of Shielded Ethernet Cables

Common in Fast Ethernet deployments, this cable will have a foil shield that wraps around unshielded twisted pairs.This cable will wrap a braided shield around unshielded twisted pairs.This cable braids a shield around a foil wrap to enclose unshielded twisted pairs.This cable wraps a braided shield around all four copper pairs. Additionally, each twisted pair is enveloped in foil.This cable encloses all copper pairs in foil. Additionally, each twisted pair is enveloped in foil.This cable only envelopes the twisted pairs in foil.No sheathing is used. Standard Cat5e cable are examples of U/UTP cables.

Solid vs. Stranded Ethernet

These terms refer to Ethernet conductors. Stranded copper cables comprise of several thin copper cables. Solid cable conductors comprise of a single, thick copper cable conductor.